Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Here you'll find today's entire program. To find individual interviews and segments you can go here.

Stateside covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri). 

Stateside 5.27.2016

May 27, 2016

Today, we talk to a couple of Detroit Reacts activists at the Venice Biennale. Also, leaded water may be bad for you, but not so much for your garden.

Stateside 5.26.2016

May 26, 2016

 

On Stateside today, we eat crickets and learn why edible insects could become a staple food source in the future. 

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 5.25.2016

May 25, 2016

Today, we learn that Gibson has not acknowledged the women who built guitars during World War II. And, we hear about the Beatles' Magical History Tour exhibit.

Stateside 5.24.2016

May 24, 2016

Today, we learn about the latest move to determine a legal THC limit for Michigan drivers. And, we talk to a Russian rocker who's inspired by Detroit.

Stateside 5.23.2016

May 23, 2016

Today we look at how fast food has changed our food landscape, and John U. Bacon explains how "nuts" the state of college sports recruiting has become.

Stateside 5.20.2016

May 20, 2016

Today, we speak with a Detroit sophomore who’s fed up with the lack of solutions for DPS. And, we look at Founders Brewing’s latest move to expand.

Stateside 5.19.2016

May 19, 2016

On Stateside today, we talk to a retiring performing arts teacher from Detroit Public Schools about why she chose teaching over her dreams of being an actor.

Stateside 5.18.2016

May 18, 2016

Today, we examine new federal rules that would expand overtime protection. And, we look at how skin-to-skin contact could benefit mothers and babies. 

Stateside 5.17.2016

May 17, 2016

On today's show, we learn about "Flint syndrome" and what it means that cities all across the state are starved for cash. 

Stateside 5.16.2016

May 16, 2016

Today, we look at how self-driving vehicles could benefit people with disabilities. And, we find out how and why that AMBER Alert woke you up at night.

Stateside 5.13.2016

May 13, 2016

In our latest edition of Songs from Studio East, band members of the olllam discuss the origin of their music. It is infused with "liberated" Irish sounds.

Stateside 5.12.2016

May 12, 2016

Stateside goes on the road for a live show from the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit.  

Stateside 5.11.2016

May 12, 2016

Free Press reporter Keith Matheny and Enbridge’s Jason Manshum talked about a 1980 oil spill in the U.P. and whether more spill sites should be reexamined.

Stateside 5.10.2016

May 10, 2016

Judi Brown Clarke joined us to discuss the mysteries surrounding the sudden resignation of Lansing's former city attorney. And, Dr. Eden Wells laid out how concerned residents of Michigan should be about Zika, dengue and chikungunya.

Stateside 5.9.2016

May 9, 2016

On today's show, Sen. Gary Peters joins us in-studio to talk about Flint funding, choosing a new Supreme Court justice and autonomous cars. And, Shobita Parthasarathy shares some lessons that Michigan could learn from India's commitment to grassroots innovation.

Stateside 5.6.2016

May 6, 2016

On today's show, we take a look at the history of the Mexican repatriation. A new study shows that when it comes to marriage, "opposites attract" no longer applies. And, we wonder whether Donald Trump isn't just a national version of Michigan's Geoffrey Fieger.

Stateside 5.5.2016

May 5, 2016

On today's show, we touch base with the Michigan Radio It's Just Politics team to help wrap our minds around the DPS plan narrowly passed by the state House. We speak with a University of Michigan researcher about what makes people really care about climate change. We also learn about spider venom and how it could hold the holy grail of natural pesticides.

Stateside 5.4.2016

May 4, 2016

In a State of Opportunity special, we take a look at the issues surrounding being young and transgender in Michigan. 

The state is in the midst of a controversy surrounding transgender people’s access to public bathrooms.

Stateside 5.3.2016

May 3, 2016

We speak with Eric Lupher about the chance that the Village of Richmond might become the first village in Michigan to disincorporate. And state Rep. Sheldon Neeley, D-Flint, also joins us to talk about whether the state has been doing enough to help Flint.

Stateside 5.2.2016

May 2, 2016

Today, we hear the latest from the struggling Detroit public school system and why teachers are staging a sick-out. We also hear from the father of 14-year-old Abbie Kopf. Kopf is recovering after she and seven others were shot by an Uber driver last Feb.

Stateside 4.29.2016

Apr 29, 2016
  • Gov. Rick Snyder and a recent MLive.com editorial are calling for the state to approve additional funding for the city of Flint.

Stateside 4.28.2016

Apr 28, 2016
  • Daniel Howes joins us to talk about Dan Gilbert's newest plans for downtown Detroit.
     
  • Upper Peninsula Poet Laureate Andrea Scarpino is on a mission to get us to give up our old misconceptions about poetry.
     
  • Poet Laureate of Grand Rapids L.S. Klatt reads his poem, "FORD."

Stateside 4.26.2016

Apr 26, 2016
  • A planned vote on the 180-day signature window on gathering signatures for statewide petition drives came to a sudden end Monday, when State Board of Canvassers Vice-Chair Norm Shinkle abruptly left the meeting.

Stateside 4.25.2016

Apr 25, 2016
  • Two years ago, the city of Flint switched its water source from the Detroit River to the Flint River. This marked the beginning of a water crisis that has received international attention and continues to this day. MLive.com/Flint Journal reporter Ron Fonger was one of the first journalists to cover the story. Fonger reflects back on the last two years and what's ahead for the city of Flint. 
Hotel Walloon
HotelWalloon.com

Childhood summers spent fishing and swimming in a pristine Northern Michigan lake would later inspire Ernest Hemingway's The Last Good Country.

The newly-opened Hotel Walloon is borrowing that reference for the name of an upcoming weekend devoted to celebrating the literary giant's Michigan connection.

For three days, guests will have an opportunity to explore the famed author's boyhood hangout near Petoskey, and hear new details about his Michigan life.

Flint water crisis protest
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Two years ago today, the city of Flint switched its drinking water source from the Detroit River to the Flint River ​– water we now know was not treated with corrosion control chemicals. Water that went on to corrode pipes and cause lead to leach into people's drinking water.

Detroit Pistons head coach Stan Van Gundy
Keith Allison / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

It has been a rough week for Detroit sports over the last week. The Pistons and the Red Wings both had their seasons come to an end in the first round of their respective playoffs. The Tigers were swept at home by their division rival, the Cleveland Indians. But on the horizon later this week, the Detroit Lions are getting ready for the 2016 NFL Draft.

Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaking with supporters in Manchester, New Hampshire
Gage Skidmore / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The United States could be on the brink of electing its first woman president. It’s a glass ceiling that has waited a long time to be broken. But why has it taken us so long to reach this point?

Nancy L. Cohen asks this very question in her new book Breakthrough: The Making of America's First Woman President.

Grocoff: "If we wish to sustain the climate to which we and all living things have adapted, then we need to design systems more like old growth forests and less like tree farms."
Jim Sorbie / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Next Idea

If the first Industrial Revolution was characterized by centralization of our water, energy, food and organizational infrastructures, then the next Industrial Revolution will be characterized by the decentralization of these human-designed systems. Biomimicry, innovation inspired by nature, will be our framework for sustainable solutions to human challenges.

  • Bill McGraw takes a look at Detroit's police department and how its relationship with the public has changed over the decades. 
     
  • Tammy Coxen shares with us a delicious sazerac with a Michigan twist.

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