Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

Flickr user Matt Taylor / Flickr

Albums, polka-dots and teddy bears aren't typically what you see as exterior house decor, but they've become a staple on Heidelberg St. in Detroit as part of the Heidelberg Project. The project is an outdoor community art environment created by Tyree Guyton.

It began when Guyton was a student at the College for Creative Studies in the 1980s. 

After a professor asked him what he wanted to achieve with his work, he had a vision.

"I was able to see using art as a medicine," said Guyton, "to take what was there and to transform it into something very whimsical."

Today on Stateside:

  • Representative Adam Zemke, Democratic Vice Chair of the House Education Committee and representative for Ann Arbor, discusses what he believes Michigan should focus on to improve early education.
  • Sandy Bakic of the New Martha Washington Bakery in Hamtramck talks to us about the Fat Tuesday tradition of paczki.
  • A new children’s book written by writer Michelle Balconi along with help from Reagan administration economist Arthur B. Laffer attempts to explain economics in a kid-friendly way.
Wikipedia Commons/Creative Commons

The White House begins its Summit on Countering Violent Extremism today.

The conference comes in the wake of deadly attacks carried out across the globe.

The shock waves over the murder of Lt. Muath al-Kasaesbeh were especially deep in southeast Michigan, where some of the pilot’s relatives live.

Joe Hertler and the Rainbow Seekers
Courtesy of Joe Hertler

Joe Hertler and the Rainbow Seekers are releasing their latest album, Terra Incognita, today. The eccentric six-piece band from Lansing and Kalamazoo often perform wearing fur coats and Hawaiian shirts, and front man Joe Hertler likes to sport rainbow angel wings or the state flag as a cape.

shelf of wine bottles
Flickr user Geoffrey Fairchild / Flickr

Can you refrigerate red wine? Or should you? Chief wine and restaurant critic for Hour Detroit Magazine Chris Cook says maybe.

According to Cook, both white and red should be ideally kept at a temperature between 40 and 55 degrees, or the typical temperature found in wine cellars.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Only one in three Michiganders feels Michigan's statewide school system deserves an A or a B grade. That's according to new polling from Michigan Radio and Public Sector Consultants.

Rep. Adam Zemke is the Democratic vice chair of the House Education Committee and he represents Ann Arbor.

Photo: Michelle Ann Photography

Michelle Balconi believes you can make economics something to “chat about” – and you can do it in a book aimed at children.

She’s a writer and a mother from Grosse Pointe Park who has teamed up with renowned Reagan administration economist Arthur B. Laffer and Clinton Township artist Mary Kinsora to create the book Let’s Chat About Economics, a nuts-and-bolts guide to economics.

 

Today on Stateside:

  • Michigan Democratic Party Chairman Lon Johnson discusses the party’s plans in the run-up to the 2016 election.  
  • BBC News Health Editor James Gallagher joins us from London to talk about lessons we can learn from the U.K.’s history with measles.

  • Writer Craig Bernier reads from and talks about his collection of short stories, Your Life Idyllic, based largely in the Detroit metropolitan area.

FLICKR USER PAHO/WHO / FLICKR

There are now 121 cases of measles in the U.S., with one confirmed case in Michigan. That’s according to the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control. Of those cases, 85% are linked to an outbreak at Disneyland.

www.michigandems.com/lon

Michigan Democrats held their party convention in Detroit over the weekend.

Their mission was to choose their top leader and to figure out how to win come Election Day 2016.

The first order of business was easy: Chairman Lon Johnson had no competition for the top leadership spot.

The second order of business, however, was a bit more involved.

Craig Bernier

Craig Bernier’s collection of short stories, Your Life Idyllic, is the winner of the St. Lawrence Book Award.

Seven of the nine stories in the book are set in metropolitan Detroit — mostly Macomb, Wayne and Oakland counties, Bernier said. One story is set at Ford’s Rouge Plant. It focuses on a man who feels trapped within his dad’s blue-collar life. 

Technology pushes companies to work for us

Feb 16, 2015

The Next Idea

The world is rapidly changing, in case you haven’t noticed.  How we fundamentally interact with businesses, with government, and with each other is moving in directions that we are only starting to comprehend.

  Today on Stateside:

  • Lt. Governor Brian Calley discusses the Snyder administration's proposed budget, and what's in store for education and transportation.
  • Jeff DeGraff, clinical professor of Management and Organizations at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, discusses why technology is not the cure-all for Michigan schools for The Next Idea.
  • Emily St. John Mandel joins us in-studio to talk about her novel Station Eleven, set in post-apocalyptic Northern Michigan. The book has just been selected as the 2015-16 Great Michigan Read.
Courtesy of City of Detroit, Mayor's Office

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan delivered his State of the City address this week.

Detroit News columnist Daniel Howes says Duggan didn't talk much about the auto industry, but instead focused on entrepreneurship and how to support small businesses.

This reflects much of Detroit, and Michigan's deeper history, according to Howes.

"Both Detroit and Michigan's roots were planted by entrepreneurs and really the Michigan that a lot of people knew and think back on, the golden age if you will, was the fruit of the entrepreneurial spirit," says Howes.

a portrait of the band with instruments
Courtesy of Lindsay Lou & the Flatbellys

Michigan natives Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellys are spreading the love of music this Valentine's Day. Their latest album Ionia will be released on Saturday.

The album was recorded in the then-home of Lindsay Lou and her husband, who is the mandolin player for the band. Since then the band has moved to Nashville.

Lou says the move was motivated by stories they heard from friends about the music community there. While Michigan has many gifted young people that inspire creativity and collaboration, Lou says they're often spread throughout the state. She says Nashville provides more of a central community of musicians to feed off of each other's artistic energy.

author reading from her book in studio
Michigan Radio

One title, one state and thousands of readers getting caught up in literary discussion. That's the Great Michigan Read, a biennial program of the Michigan Humanities Council.

The 2015-16 winning book is Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel.

It was a 2014 National Book Award Finalist along with being named one of the Top Ten Books of the Year by the Washington Post, Time Magazine and Amazon. Michigan Radio program director Tamar Charney reviewed it earlier this year.

Flickr/Brian Flickinger

The Next Idea

Technological innovation alone doesn’t improve education. We often assume that the latest gadgets and software will change everything — that they will make things easier and better and solve larger problems. The truth is that technology is just one aspect in a larger web of cultural issues, and new breakthroughs by themselves will not have a broad effect on overall learning.

Why we must grieve

Feb 12, 2015

All this week on Stateside, in our series Living with Death, we're talking to people about how the process of death and dying has changed. Today we talk about why we must grieve when someone we love has died.

Imagine if your friends referred to you as “the death lady.” That’s what Kim Parr’s friends like to call her and honestly, she has mixed feelings about the nickname.

Michigan Radio

It’s estimated that in the United States some 22 veterans commit suicide every day.

“It is a tragedy, one that we have to deal with,” Michigan Democratic Senator Gary Peters said. “In my mind we have a sacred obligation to take care of those who have served us overseas, so we need to address it immediately.”

Today on Stateside:

·        In the U.S., it’s estimated that some 22 veterans commit suicide every day. U.S. Sen. Gary Peters, D-Michigan, is co-sponsoring legislation to try and improve mental health care for veterans. Peters joined us to discuss the issue.

·        Charles Eisendrath, the director of the national journalism program Knight-Wallace Fellows at the University of Michigan talks about the controversy surrounding NBC News Anchor Brian Williams.

How do you get in a good relationship and stay in it? You could say, that is one of life's $64,000 questions!

And, it is a central question driving the characters in a collection of short stories by West Michigan author Lisa Lenzo. 

The book is Strange Love. The stories take us through the lives of Annie Zito, a divorced mom and her daughter Marly. The book was also on the 2015 list of Michigan Notable Books.

There was a time when you'd see plenty of cars with Ontario plates parked at shopping centers and stores in Southeast Michigan.

That's because the Canadian dollar was so strong against the American dollar.

Rebecca Kruth

All this week on Stateside, in our series Living with Death, we're talking to people about how the process of death and dying has changed. Today: what's it really like to be a small-town mortician?

When Stateside's Rebecca Kruth lost her father, her family turned to Larry Skinner, the Eaton Rapids funeral director who's been helping the community say its goodbyes for years. 

As part of our Living with Death series, Kruth talked to Skinner about what it's like planning funerals in a town where everyone knows everyone.

We originally aired this story on Valentine's Day, 2012.

It packs a lot into three minutes: young love, religious intolerance, small town bigotry, and the difficult life decisions we all have to make. 

It ends with a high school reunion that changed everything.

73-year-old Judith Narrol and 74-year-old Ed Storement were married on Valentine's Day, 2012.  They tell us they couldn't be happier. 

FLICKR FRANK KOVALCHEK/FLICKR

Frida Waara takes on Marquette winters with gusto. She spoke with Stateside host Cyndy Canty about the “fantastic” season and the UP 200 Dog Sledding Championship event it brings.

On Feb. 12-16, mushers will race a total of 240 miles, from Marquette to Grand Marais and back. Waara has done it before and says the race brings all sorts of people to compete.

taxcredits.net

Governor Snyder is set to deliver his budget proposal for the next fiscal year tomorrow morning in Lansing. The just released Michigan Radio/Public Sector Consultants poll takes a look at where the voters of Michigan would like to see the state invest.

media.ford.com

When you hear the term "midlife crisis" most people imagine a fifty-something guy driving off in a new sports car, but it turns out women are casting their eyes on midlife crisis cars too.

A new survey from CarMax decided to determine just what a midlife crisis car actually is. Publisher of thedetroitbureau.com Paul Eisenstein says the survey found a little less than a third of people give into these urges and purchase the car of their dreams.

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Opponents of charter schools are failing to make effective arguments for their position against them, while proponents are creating a stronger consensus for them finds a study conducted by Michigan State University professors Sarah Reckhow and Matt Grossman, along with University of Rochester PhD student Benjamin Evans.

Michelle Chamuel's latest album, "Face the Fire," is out today. Chamuel was previously the lead singer of Michigan-based band Ella Riot, and more recently Chamuel gained fame as runner-up on season four of "The Voice."

David Ohmer / Flickr

All this week on Stateside, in our series Living with Death, we're talking to people about how the process of death and dying has changed. Today: do you have any control of your social media presence once you're gone? 

It's safe to say that many of us live much of our lives online.

Where Grandma may have had precious old letters tucked into a trunk, we have emails stored on servers or in the Cloud. Where Mom had her photo albums or boxes stuffed with priceless photos, we've got ours on Flickr.

What happens to all of that when we die?

To find out, we talked to Michigan Radio's social media producer Kimberly Springer. She explains the price of not planning ahead to the day we are gone and the etiquette of handling deaths on social media.

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