Stateside with Cynthia Canty

Monday through Thursday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

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Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside with Cynthia Canty covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside with Cynthia Canty will focus on topics and events that matter to people all across the state.

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Politics & Government
5:28 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Detroit featured on MSNBC's 'Morning Joe' today

Screen grab from 'Morning Joe'
MSNBS

It's Thursday, our day to meet up with Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes. Today we spoke with him about how Detroit got the spotlight for the three hours of MSNBC's "Morning Joe" today. The show was broadcast live from the Ford Flat Rock Assembly Plant to highlight the fact that Ford is switching production of its Fusion from Mexico to Flat Rock - spending $550 million to tune-up the Flat Rock plant, and adding 1,400 jobs at the plant. 
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Politics & Culture
5:17 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Stateside for Thursday, August 29th, 2013

Some schools in Michigan are going all out trying to entice parents to enroll their kids with incentives and gimmicks. That's because more students means more per-pupil funding -- but with gift cards, Kindles, and even a car? On today's show, we asked when is enough enough? And, then, with the long-labor day weekend soon upon us, we looked back and learned how Labor Day was celebrated in Michigan in the 1800s. But first, we met up with Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes and spoke with him about how Detroit got the spotlight for the three hours of MSNBC's "Morning Joe" today.

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Stateside
5:08 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Slowing down climate change, one cloned tree at a time

A stand of red pine trees in the Huron-Manistee National Forest.
Photo courtesy of Joseph O'Brien, USDA Forest Service

David Milarch co-founded Archangel Ancient Tree Archive in 2008. 

His vision?

To spread the genetics of the world's remaining ancient forests. His work attracted the attention of journalist and science writer Jim Robbins, and the result was the book The Man Who Planted Trees: Lost Groves, Champion Trees and an Urgent Plan to Save the Planet.

To listen to the interview, click the link above.

Stateside
5:04 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Development group having success in attracting new residents to Detroit

The offices of the Grandmont Rosedale Development Corporation.
GRDC Facebook

It's no secret that the Great Recession took a huge toll on Michigan's population.

Our state population dropped for six straight years, leveled out from 2010-2011, and increased slightly from 2011-2012.

For many cities and neighborhoods, the post-recession challenge is getting new residents back into vacant homes.

One Detroit neighborhood is succeeding in that challenge: the Grandmont-Rosedale area, which is actually made up of five smaller areas on Detroit's West Side.

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Politics & Culture
4:22 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

Today on the show, high schools across Michigan are turning out fewer graduates. With the graduate pool shrinking, colleges and universities are searching for ways to make up the gap.

And, then, rebounding home values in Michigan mean more people are able to tap into quick cash through home equity loans., but that might not necessarily be such a good thing.

But first we start in Lansing. That's where last night, the state Senate approved legislation to extend Medicaid benefits to hundreds of thousands of Michigan residents.

The measure initially failed when it didn’t get the 20 votes needed to pass. But, then, the chamber agreed to reconsider the bill, and it passed with Republican Senator Tom Casperson switching his vote to ‘yes.” Governor Snyder praised the Senate yesterday for moving the bill forward.

Stateside
3:55 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Fewer high school graduates means creative adjustments for colleges

There are fewer high school graduates, which means colleges have to fight over students
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Colleges and universities in Michigan have been grappling with ways to fill the revenue hole after the state Legislature cut funding for higher education. 

But now there's another problem -- fewer students. 

Brian Prescott is the director of Policy Research at the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education. The Commission recently released a major report called "Knocking at the College Door," which found that Michigan was second only to California in the decreasing number of high school graduates. 

Prescott said that's because the children of baby boomers have graduated high school, so future graduating classes are becoming smaller. 

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Stateside
3:02 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Detroit's new festival focuses on sports, noise, idea and form

Kevin Krease, Founder & Director of Action Sports Detroit
LinkedIn

Sports, noise, idea and form. Those are the core components of a new festival that could be created in Detroit.

After Detroit lost its bid for the X-Games, the guys who led Detroit's X-Games campaign decided to come up with a new idea for the city. 

Kevin Krease and Garret Koehler of Action Sports Detroit are integrating food, art, music and sports into their project. The festival, called Assemble, would be one week long.

One of their biggest goals is to make Detroit home to the premier BMX and skate competition in the United States.

To hear the full interview, click the link above.

Stateside
2:32 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

Home prices are 'going strong,' which means more home equity loans for homeowners

Home prices are on the rise. Maybe not for these two, though.
JasonParis Flickr

We see Michigan home prices, by and large, climbing back up from the depths of the Great Recession. 

Detroit-area home prices were 16% higher since less than one year ago. That's according to the Standard & Poor's Case-Shiller home price index. That means that home prices in the six counties of southeast Michigan are higher than they've been since 2008. 

Rebounding home values means that more people are able to tap into cash through home equity loans. But, if you're eyeing a home equity loan, be careful.

That's the advice from Detroit Free Press personal finance columnist Susan Tompor.

To listen to the audio interview, click the link above.

Stateside
1:56 pm
Wed August 28, 2013

So, what happens next with Medicaid expansion?

Yesterday the Senate passed a Medicaid expansion bill
Lester Graham Michigan Radio

Yesterday, the state Senate approved legislation to extend Medicaid benefits to hundreds of thousands of Michigan residents. The measure initially failed when it didn't get the 20 votes needed to pass.

Later, the chamber agreed to reconsider the bill, and it passed when Republican Senator Tom Casperson switched his vote to 'yes.' 

Now, the bill is going back to the House before it's sent to Governor Snyder. 

Rick Pluta is the Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network. He explained the potential timeline for when the House could vote on it, and when the bill (if passed) could take effect. 

To listen to the full interview, click the link above.

Politics & Culture
3:43 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

The Pentagon is proposing to cut back production of the Bradley Fighting Vehicle. We looked at what that could mean for the Michigan companies that make parts for the Bradley.

And, who wins and who loses when a major freeway is widened through urban neighborhoods?

And we looked at the local food scene in Grand Rapids to see just how food builds a sense of place.

Also, a dead zone has developed in Green Bay. What is causing it and is there anything we can do to fix it?

First on the show, There's been lots to celebrate in terms of sales for the U.S. car makers, bouncing back in a big way from their near-death experiences.

But those strong sales have the auto companies and their suppliers boosting production at a fast rate. And that could be having an unwanted effect---declining customer satisfaction with the vehicles they're turning out.

Claes Fornell, founder of the American Customer Satisfaction Index, joined us today to talk about the latest survey results.

Stateside
2:09 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Grand Rapids is the site of a culinary revolution

Clagett Farm CSA Week 10 thebittenworld.com

An interview with Lisa Rose Starner about her new book.

Let’s talk food. Delicious, fresh, healthy, local food.

That is the mission of Lisa Rose Starner, to get as many of us as possible to eat local. And there’s plenty of that happening in Grand Rapids, from community gardens to microbreweries to food entrepreneurs and artisans and so much more. Lisa was invited to tell the many stories of the Grand Rapids local food scene and the result is her book “Grand Rapids Food: A Culinary Revolution."

Lisa Rose Starner joined us today from the WGVU studios in Grand Rapids. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
1:32 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

US car sales are up but customer satisfaction is down

Claes Fornell is the founder of the American Customer Satisfaction Index.
Wikipedia

An interview with Claes Fornell, founder of the American Customer Satisfaction Index.

There's been lots to celebrate in terms of sales for the U.S. car makers, bouncing back in a big way from their near-death experiences.

But those strong sales have the auto companies and their suppliers boosting production at a fast rate. And that could be having an unwanted effect---declining customer satisfaction with the vehicles they're turning out.

Claes Fornell, founder of the American Customer Satisfaction Index, joined us today to talk about the latest survey results.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
1:11 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

What is causing the Green Bay dead zone and can it be fixed?

Excess algae is creating a dead zone.
NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Flickr

An interview with Don Scavia, an aquatic ecologist with the University of Michigan and the director of the Graham Sustainability Institute.

There's a "dead zone" in Green Bay.

That may sound like a title of a Stephen King novel, but it is happening in Lake Michigan's Green Bay. A growing dead zone with so little oxygen that fish can't survive. Neither can smaller critters.

Don Scavia is an aquatic ecologist with the University of Michigan and the director of the Graham Sustainability Institute. He joined us today to talk about what’s causing this dead zone and what can be done to fix it.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
7:03 am
Tue August 27, 2013

Stateside for Monday, August 26th, 2013

If there's one song that captures the feel of Motown, Detroit, and America in the 1960s, it's Martha Reeves singing "Dancing in the Streets." On today's show we talked about the historical importance of this Motown classic.

And, we explored the concept behind community cafes, how they work and where you can find one near you.

Also, Ontario Power Generation is proposing to build a nuclear waste dump site on the shore of Lake Huron. How will this affect the drinking water?

First on the show, this promises to be an important week for the State Senate. This could be the week the Senate decides whether or not to expand Medicaid to more low-income adults in Michigan.

You may recall, the Senate broke off for its summer break in June without taking a vote on Medicaid, something that so incensed Governor Snyder that he came home early from a trade trip to Israel in order to publicly scold the Senate.

So, two months later, it appears a vote is at hand.

Rick Pluta, the Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, joined us today.

Stateside
10:24 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Dearborn has a non-profit Panera Bread

A worker at Panera Cares.
paneracares.org

An interview with Kate Antonacci, the Director of Societal Impact Initiatives for Panera.

One of the community cafes in Michigan is called "Panera Cares." It's a non-profit Panera Bread location in Dearborn that uses the pay-what-you-can model.

Kate Antonacci is the Director of Societal Impact Initiatives for Panera. She joined us from corporate headquarters in Boston.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:59 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Nuclear waste repository might be built on the shore of Lake Huron

Derek A Young Flickr

An interview with Detroit News reporter Jim Lynch.

A proposal by a Canadian power company to store nuclear waste at a site within a mile of Lake Huron is setting off alarm bells on this side of the border.

Ontario Power Generation is drawing up plans to store low-to-medium level nuclear waste at an underground repository it wants to build in Ontario near the town of Kincardine. That is on the shore of Lake Huron and critics, including some state lawmakers, worry that storing nuclear waste so close to the lake could threaten the drinking water for 40 million people.

Detroit News reporter Jim Lynch has been following the story and he joined us today from Detroit.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:26 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Non-profit community cafes are catching on across the country

Denise Cerreta
oneworldeverybodyeatsfoundation.org

An interview with Denise Cerreta, who started the non-profit One World Everybody Eats.

The community café, it’s a concept catching on all across the country. Open a restaurant, serve good food, let the patrons choose their portions, and let them price the portions themselves. The goal? To eliminate hunger, eliminate food waste, and create food security.

Denise Cerreta launched the community café ten years ago with her One World Café in Salt Lake City. From that start she’s gone on to found a non-profit called One World Everybody Eats, and that non-profit has guided some three dozen community cafes across the country, including some in Michigan, with more in the planning stages.

Denise Cerreta joined us today from Santa Fe, New Mexico. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:06 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

What difference does art education really make anyway?

Keon Pearson and her son Keontay Seymour talk about the difference art education has made for Keontay at the West Michigan Center for Art and Technology.
Courtesy of the West Michigan Arts and Technology Center courtesy of WMCAT

Only a handful of public schools in Grand Rapids still offer art classes of any kind. To fill the gap, the West Michigan Center for Arts and Technology (WMCAT) offers free art education at their facility in downtown Grand Rapids.

State of Opportunity's Story Booth stopped by WMCAT this summer. The booth goes out across the state to capture stories we might not otherwise hear.

Teenagers participating in various summer art education programs shared stories about what art means to them.  

Keon Pearson and her son Keontay Seymour both came into the booth to talk to each other about how access to art education has changed Keontay and State of Opportunity's Youth Journalist Alex Wilson produced this audio postcard.

Stateside
2:08 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

Senate may finally vote on Medicaid expansion this week

The Michigan Senate chamber.
Lester Graham Michigan Radio

An interview with Rick Pluta, the Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network.

This promises to be an important week for the State Senate. This could be the week the Senate decides whether or not to expand Medicaid to more low-income adults in Michigan.

You may recall, the Senate broke off for its summer break in June without taking a vote on Medicaid, something that so incensed Governor Snyder that he came home early from a trade trip to Israel in order to publicly scold the Senate.

So, two months later, it appears a vote is at hand.

Rick Pluta, the Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
1:25 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

New book explores how one Motown song embodied the spirit of revolution

Writer Mark Kurlansky.
Wikipedia

An interview with writer Mark Kurlansky.

“Dancing in the Street,” written by Mickey Stevenson, Ivy Jo Hunter and Marvin Gaye, and recorded in two takes, less than 10 minutes, by Martha Reeves. For many, that song is Motown.

Little did they know after slapping down Martha’s vocals in that studio in Hitsville on West Grand Boulevard, they had created a song that would come to represent a watershed moment in history--Motown’s history, Detroit’s history, and America’s history.

Writer Mark Kurlansky talks about the story of how this hit Motown song became the rallying point for these important moments in history in his newest book, “Ready For A Brand New Beat: How ‘Dancing in the Street’ Became the Anthem for a Changing America.”

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