Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri). 

To find audio for the full show you can subscribe to our podcast or go here.

Pre school classroom
FLICKER USER BLOOMBERRIES / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

For working parents with young children, child care is not a luxury. It's a necessity. But for many low-income families in Michigan, it's out of reach.

Consider this: it costs around $10,000 a year to send a toddler to high-quality child care.

That is almost as much as it costs to send a kid to college at a public university.

Courtesy of Michigan Tech Archieves

The history of Copper Country in the Upper Peninsula tends to focus on mining and the mostly European immigrants who worked those mines. 

That traditional history is missing something: the presence of African-Americans.

Commonwealth Detroit works at offering affordable property for creative minds in their 128,000-square-foot building.
Robert Elmes / Commonwealth Detroit

The Next Idea

Young artists can struggle to make a living if they lack the proper knowledge to start and care for a storefront – and that’s where a new Detroit project comes in.

A cyanobacteria bloom on Lake Erie in 2013.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

 

It's been two years since drinking water in Toledo was contaminated by cyanobacteria in Lake Erie.

Four hundred thousand Toledo-area residents couldn't drink the water for a few days.

 

That fired up Pam Taylor to start tracking how Lake Erie's been getting contaminated.

 

Drew Philp is walking from Detroit to the RNC in Cleveland, passing fields like this one near Monroe, Mich.
Courtesy of Drew Philp

Cleveland is just days away from hosting this year’s Republican National Convention. Delegates, candidates, and reporters are flying and driving from across the world cover the event.

However, Drew Philp chose to use his own two feet. He’s coming all the way from Detroit and documenting his journey for Belt magazine.

And why did he choose the RNC as his destination?

“It’s closer than Philadelphia,” Philp laughed. “But I’m also curious about Donald Trump.”

Maan, Bayan, and their three children arrived in Dearborn in April. The family does not want their names or faces revealed because they fear any media attention could endanger their relatives still in Syria.
Joe Linstroth / Michigan Radio

To understand the tragic toll of the civil war in Syria, you need look no further than the city of Homs.

The western Syrian city was held by rebels and under attack by government forces.

Four years ago, on February 22, 2012, American-born reporter Marie Colvin spoke to CNN from Homs, trying to describe her anger at the shelling of civilians in the city:

“There are 28,000 civilians, men, women and children, hiding, being shelled, defenseless.”

“So it’s a complete and utter lie that they’re only going after terrorists. There are rockets, shells, tank shells, anti-aircraft being fired in parallel lines into the city. The Syrian Army is simply shelling a city of cold, starving civilians.”

Shortly after that report, Marie Colvin and a young French photographer were killed when ten rockets blasted into their makeshift media center.

The Michigan Legislature meets today, but don't hold your breath expecting a whole lot to happen.

Our It's Just Politics team of Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta joined us today to take a look at the attendance card for the state Legislature. 

Clark told us that the House is scheduled to meet 80 days while the Senate scheduled 83, for a total of 163 days this session. That's more than 40 days short of the average 205 days per session. 

Retired U.S. Army Lt. Col. Charles Kettles
Jodie Westrick / Michigan Radio

Next Monday, the nation will say thank you to 86-year-old Charles Kettles.

President Obama will present the Vietnam veteran helicopter pilot with the Medal of Honor, the military’s highest award, for a courageous rescue mission in the heat of ferocious combat.

Davontae Sanford was wrongfully convicted of four murders at age 14. He was released from prison last month after spending nearly nine years behind bars.
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio

The case goes back to a grisly quadruple homicide in Detroit in 2007.

Police interrogated 14-year-old Davontae Sanford, who says he was coerced into giving a false confession.

Former Detroit police commander James Tolbert was one of the cops who questioned Sanford. He testified in court that Sanford was able to draw a crime scene sketch for police of where the murders took place.

But later, Tolbert admitted to police that he actually drew most of the sketch.

Still, Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy announced late Tuesday there's insufficient evidence to charge Tolbert with perjury. Her office says even if Tolbert changed his statements about evidence, it’s really hard to actually prove perjury, because you have to prove that somebody intentionally lied under oath.

Prisoners of war held in Michigan’s camps were mostly German, but there were also soldiers of other nationalities, like these Italians captured by the Germans in Greece in 1943.
Wikimedia user Bild Bundesarchiv / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

There aren't many books that serve up history, suspense, crime and a love story, all beautifully tied together.

Wolf's Mouth manages to offer all that and more.

A new report from Global Detroit emphasizes the importance of keeping international student graduates for Michigan’s economy.
Flickr user University of Michigan's Ford School/Flickr

Michigan’s economy should stop wasting the brainpower it already has by retaining more international students, a new report says.

Steve Tobocman is the director of Global Detroit, a non-profit that studies what makes Michigan attractive to international populations. He told Stateside that their research fights a widespread belief.

After nearly nine years of wrongful imprisonment, Davontae Sanford is reunited with his mom, Taminko Sanford, this summer
Val Newman

After nearly nine years of being wrongfully imprisoned for murder, Davontae Sanford is free.

During his time in prison, which began when he was 14 years old, he missed out on many things. Sanford's  trying to get back to a normal life with  many people trying to help him with that difficult transition. A month after being released, he took the first step toward that goal by landing a job set up through someone who saw his case reported on a local TV station.

According to Terry Kogan, public "multi-user" restrooms didn't really exist in America until the 1870s.
flickr user Ted Eytan / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Deciding who should be allowed to use what bathroom has consumed a lot of attention across the country, and certainly here in Michigan.

With all the controversy about public restrooms and transgender people using the ones that match their gender identity, let's roll back the years to figure out just how sex-segregated bathrooms came to be in the first place.

Terry Kogan is a professor at the University of Utah's College of Law. He has spent the past decade considering the rights of transgender people, and the public restroom question in particular. 

A student inmate reads in class
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

For a convicted felon, getting a shot at an education might begin in prison.

Typically that means job training or a GED.

But a new program offers something more often associated with quiet campuses and ivy-covered walls.

The Calvin Prison Initiative is bringing the liberal arts and theology to inmates at a west Michigan prison.

More than 300 people came to Ypsilanti High School to participate in a meeting on police-community relations.
Daniel Rayzel / Michigan Radio

Ypsilanti residents are calling for action to improve police-community relations following related nationwide events over the past week.

prison cells
Thomas Hawk / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

There are 2.2 million people now incarcerated in American prisons. 

Each year, hundreds of thousands of those inmates are released.

One of the most important ways of keeping them from re-offending and winding up back in prison is education. 

Photo courtesy of John Sims

 

Multi-media artist John Sims is on a mission to re-work and re-frame Confederate symbols, like the Confederate flag and the song "Dixie."

Sims has recolored Confederate flags and used them in public performances and installations.

Now he is re-imagining "Dixie" in an array of musical styles.

 

Children
Credit Flickr user Herald Post/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

Who are Michigan's homeless students? And how does being homeless affect their education?

These are crucial questions for the state, as education plays an important role in homeless students' ability to escape the chains of poverty and homelessness.

Joshua Cowen is an associate professor in the Department of Educational Administration at Michigan State University. He recently published a study examining these important questions. His study reveals exactly who Michigan's homeless students are and where they come from. It also reveals how homelessness affects a students performance in schools.

Urban farming is one way public space is being used in Detroit.
Flickr user Liz Patek / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Next Idea

 

Private development has changed the face of Detroit. New restaurants, shops and houses have popped up in Midtown, Corktown and downtown Detroit. But what about public spaces?

 

Our latest contributor to The Next Idea is Anya Sirota, an assistant professor of architecture at the University of Michigan. She’s also the principal of Akoaki, a practice in Detroit involving architecture, art and cultural infrastructure.

 

Sirota believes there aren’t enough public spaces in Detroit that offer openness and the opportunity to build a sense of belonging. She thinks public space is crucial to the health of a city.

Attorney General Bill Schuette
Bill Schuette

 

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette faces complex legal hurdles in civil lawsuits against a water company and an engineering company, along with their parent companies.

 

The lawsuit claims that Veolia North America of Delaware and Lockwood, Andrews and Newnam of Texas failed to take proper steps in the Flint water crisis and created a public nuisance. The suit aims to collect money for damages.

 

But legal experts say there are a number of issues that could stand in the way of a potential win for the attorney general in trial or in a settlement.

Flickr user Scott Davidson/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The lawyer for a suburban Minnesota police officer who killed a black driver during a traffic stop last week says the officer was reacting to Philando Castile's gun, not his race. The attorney  did not elaborate on how Castile presented the weapon or what led up to the fatal traffic stop and shooting. The video Castile's fiance took of the aftermath of his shooting has Concealed Pistol License (CPL) holders asking themselves: What are the do's and don'ts if you are stopped by police?

Tensions have heightened between police departments and communities across the country.
Flickr user Matthew Sutherland / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

 

It’s been a tough week for the nation. It saw numerous tragedies, such as the police shootings that killed Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, and the shootings in Dallas that killed five police officers.

These events have heightened unrest between police and their communities, and protests were seen across the country in places like Baton Rouge, Chicago and New York City.

Sgt. Terry Dixon, the public information officer for the Grand Rapids Police Department, joined us to talk about his department's response to last week's tragedies and its effort to bring diversity into law enforcement.

Stateside 7.8.2016

Jul 8, 2016

Today, we discuss racism, unconscious bias, and how many white people want to believe we live in a post-racial society when inequalities still exist. We also discuss the right to record police, and how that right could be "critical" to bringing reform.

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 7.7.2016

Jul 7, 2016

Today, we hear about new technology that helps create sensory experiences for children with autism. And, a doctor explains why removing the stigma of addiction could improve opioid abuse treatment.

 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 7.6.2016

Jul 6, 2016

Today, we look at the chilly relationship between AG Bill Schuette and Gov. Snyder, and we learn about a fatal disease threatening Michigan's deer.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 7.5.2016

Jul 5, 2016

Today, we look at a proposed community benefits ordinance in Detroit. And, a conversation about whether schools are doing enough to help dyslexic students.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 7.1.2016

Jul 1, 2016

 

Today, we kick off our Artisans of Michigan series and head to Cobbler's Corner in Northville for an inside look at what it takes to repair a shoe. And, the state fire marshal warns to be cautious of fireworks this Fourth of July. It's dry out there.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 6.30.2016

Jun 30, 2016

Today, we look at Michigan's 2017 budget. And, we wonder why the insured are at greatest risk of falling through the mental health care safety net. 

Stateside 6.29.2016

Jun 29, 2016

Today, we talk with the founder of The First Cannabis Church of Logic and Reason in Lansing. We also talk with a GVSU music ensemble embarking on a tour commemorating our national parks.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 6.28.2016

Jun 28, 2016

Today, we wonder what new abortion rulings in Texas could mean for Michigan. And, we learn about the charitable side of Ramadan in Michigan.

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