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Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri). 

To find audio for the full show you can subscribe to our podcast or go here.

Lindsey Scullen / Michigan Radio

 

They’re known as the Mother Earth Water Walkers: Two Anishinaabe grandmothers and a group of Anishinaabe women and men, walking the perimeter of the Great Lakes, hoping to raise awareness of the environmental and manmade threats against the lakes.

They began walking in 2003, and over the next six years walked all of the 11,525 miles around the Great Lakes.

Now the story of the Water Walkers is told in a children’s book by Michigan author Carol Trembath, with illustrations by David W. Craig.

A demolition in Detroit.
City of Detroit / via Facebook

A federal investigation into Detroit’s demolition program under Mayor Mike Duggan seems to be picking up speed, and possibly widening in scope.

Federal agents visited the Detroit land bank Wednesday.

The land bank has used almost $130 million in federal money, originally allocated for foreclosure prevention, on demolitions as part of Duggan’s aggressive blight elimination campaign.

The evolution from Motor City to Mobility City

Nov 16, 2016
Dave Pinter / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

For the last century, almost since the day Henry Ford’s first assembly line started rolling in 1913, Detroit has been known as the Motor City. It was a regional point of pride that cars made in Michigan could be found zipping down roadways in every U.S. state and across the globe.

That image has been battered in recent decades as factories have been shuttered and work forces trimmed. But today a new vision is emerging, one in which Detroit specializes not only in building cars, but in all things transportation. That includes new technologies like autonomous vehicles, but it also means connecting those technologies to services like public transportation and bike shares.

In short: everything that moves people, goods, or information from point A to point B. Call it the “Mobility City.”

“The biggest fear is that we would go backwards into fear rather than forward into hope. That we’d go backwards into polarization, not forward into unity. We’ve made an awful lot of progress in the last 50 years, and that progress is now threatened.”
Laura Weber / MPRN

 

A week ago, we woke up to the news that Donald Trump is our president-elect.

Since that day, we’ve seen a flood of reported hate incidents across the country.

Courtesy of Marcel Price

It's a real challenge to talk about mental health issues and challenges — even more so when you're young, when you feel like an "other."

Marcel Price is tackling that challenge through poetry and spoken word. As "Fable The Poet,” this young Michigander writes about mental wellness. And in his work with Mental Health America, he's traveling to high schools around Michigan and across the country, helping kids understand their shared struggles.

Animal bones found in the Saints Rest privy.
Courtesy of Autumn Byers

Archeology is not just about digging into prehistory, coming up with arrowheads, pottery shards and mastodon bones.

It can also give us a window into the not-too-distant past.

Say, the campus of Michigan State University in the mid-1800s.

That’s what Autumn Beyer is doing in her work with the MSU Campus Archeology Program. She’s studying what students and professors ate in the early days at Michigan State and how they got that food.

The RTA identified the Michigan Avenue Corridor as one of the areas that would have benefited from a regional transit system, had the millage passed.
Regional Transit Authority

It's back to the drawing board for those who've been working towards a true regional transportation system for Southeast Michigan.

A slim majority of voters across Wayne, Oakland, Macomb and Washtenaw counties last week rejected the regional transit millage. And it will be two years before the RTA can try again.

Stateside was joined by the President and CEO of the Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce, Sandy Baruah, who had been hoping the RTA millage would pass. 

 "My grandmother always told me I was smart, and so I believed it. And so by the time she left, being smart and doing good in school was something that Shawn just did," Blanchard told us.
Courtesy of Shawn Blanchard

 


If anyone seemed destined for a life that would either end in a drug deal gone bad or in prison, it would probably be Shawn Blanchard.

Everything in his life pointed him down that path, beginning with the fact that Shawn was born with crack cocaine in his system.

Instead, Blanchard is a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he majored in math and economics. He’s also a graduate of Wayne State University’s Law School.

His memoir is titled How ‘Bout That for a Crack Baby.

Laurel Premo and Anna Gustavsson
Courtesy of Premo & Gustavsson

 

Take fiddle and banjo tunes of the United States and mix them with the music and dance tunes of Sweden, and there you have Premo & Gustavsson.

Our Songs from Studio East series explores music that combines both contemporary and traditional music from around the world. Premo & Gustavsson fit that bill perfectly.

Portland General Electric / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Last week, amid the frenzy that followed the presidential election, the Michigan Senate passed a pair of bills that would mean a dramatic overhaul of Michigan’s energy policy. The bills, which still have to make it through the Michigan House of Representatives, would be the first new energy policy in Michigan since 2008.

We spoke with Rick Pluta, Michigan Radio’s Lansing Bureau Chief, about the new legislation. He told us that, although the two bills both had bipartisan support and passed by wide margins, they also have detractors.

For many Michiganders, the start of firearm hunting season is like a state holiday. Today, tens of thousands of hunters hope they'll be successful as they head outdoors in search of deer. 

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) hopes the successful hunters will stop by one of their deer check stations before having their deer processed. It's a good way for the DNR to keep tabs on the health of Michigan's deer herds.

screen grab from 60 Minutes / CBS News

Over the last week since Donald Trump was declared the winner of the 2016 Presidential Election, there have been an increase in the number of reports of harassment and bullying directed at students of color and religious minorities.

Speaking to Lesley Stahl last night on CBS' 60 Minutes, President-elect Donald Trump addressed the recent incidents.

Trump said he was "saddened" by the news and implored people to "stop it".

Some have taken issue with Officer Peters' actions, while others are defending his First Amendment right to express himself.
flickr user edward stojakovic / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Since Donald Trump’s election there has been an increase nationwide in reports of harassment and intimidation of minorities.

One such incident is making headlines in Traverse City. Police Officer Michael Peters has been suspended after flying the Confederate flag on his truck at a “Love Trumps Hate” rally.

FLICKR USER STEVEN DEPOLO / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Next Idea

The thrill of riding a two-wheeled bicycle, clutching the game-winning ball, or making a show-stopping save in soccer are examples of rites of passage that every child should have the opportunity to experience. Unfortunately, many children with disabilities never develop the physical skills or confidence to participate in extracurricular programming like this. Adapted physical education - physical education modified to teach fundamental motor skills – is hard to find in Southeast Michigan. And this kind of adapted learning can be a gateway to sports, games, and other physical activity that promotes emotional and physical well-being.

Donald Trump
user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

There’s no better way to understand what lies ahead than to take a look at our history.

Gleaves Whitney sat down with us today to talk about what history might tell us about Donald Trump’s Election Day victory and the turmoil and division that’s been left in the wake of this long, tough campaign.

ESPN's College Gameday is coming to Kalamazoo this weekend as Western Michigan is one of two remaining unbeaten teams in the country.
Joel Dinda / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

It was a stunning weekend at the top of the College Football Playoff Rankings as the teams ranked second, third and fourth (the top four qualify for the playoff) were all upset.

One of those teams was the University of Michigan who fell to Iowa on the road by the score of 14-13. The last time the teams ranked second, third and fourth all lost on the same day was in 1985.

Courtesy of Dawud Walid

In the past week, middle school students in Royal Oak chanted “Build the Wall,” a Canton police officer was suspended over a racist Facebook post, and a University of Michigan student reported she was confronted by a man who threatened to set her on fire if she didn’t remove her hijab.

These are just some of the incidents reported since last week’s election of Donald Trump, which came after a long campaign that often focused on Muslims.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

World War II vintage planes are big attractions at air shows across the nation, but keeping them in the air means repairs and new parts.

That’s where Dave Groh comes in. He operates Yesteryear Aviation Incorporated near Mason, Michigan.

He rebuilds and makes parts for planes that were used to train pilots. He’s got one himself. Their mostly wood and canvas bi-planes.

Why rebuild WWII trainers?

“Because we love aviation,” he chuckled, adding, “and we like World War II aircraft in particular.”

Gary Elrod / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The new international trade crossing between Detroit and Windsor seemed to be making all kinds of progress. In 2015, the Canadian government agreed to pick up Michigan’s share of the Gordie Howe Bridge’s cost, removing a major hurdle to the project’s completion.

While the Canadians were at work building approaches on their side of the Detroit River, Michigan was supposed to be purchasing the necessary property to do the same on the U.S. side.

But somewhere along the way, progress stalled. 

Sikkema told us it's "premature to start talking about opposition. I think you need to give the president-elect a chance and time to lead.”
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Time for another look at the week in politics with Ken Sikkema and Susan Demas.

There have been protests against the election of Donald Trump around Michigan and across the nation.

Many Republicans see these protesters as little more than sore losers throwing a fit.

Flickr user Presidio of Monterey / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

In recent years, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), has been taken a lot more seriously. But, the general public is often not aware of the struggles returning veterans have with the disorder.

Stephanie Shannon is a veteran of Desert Storm and Desert Shield operations during the first Gulf War. She’s the founder and CEO of Michigan Women Veterans Empowerment and she joined Stateside to talk about how women who fight for our country deserve more recognition for their service. 

Ferland told us he's planning on setting up a few more tents for protestors at Standing Rock.
Courtesy of Michigan Host Tent at Standing Rock / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Several Native American tribes and Canadian First Nation tribes are joining members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.

Members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe say the pipeline will contaminate water and other resources and damage land that is sacred to the Sioux.

It’s a major pipeline for Energy Transfer Partners. According to an NPR report, it’s a $3.8 billion project that would pump 500,000 barrels of oil a day.

Regis Ferland lives in Mount Pleasant. He and his cousin Amos Cloud have set up a 16-foot by 32-foot army surplus tent near the protests at Standing Rock.

Their plan is to make it a place to stay for people from Michigan who join the protest.

Courtesy of Saladin Ahmed

 

The election of Donald Trump as president is a concern for a number of people. Trump has singled out Muslims as people he wants to stop from immigrating to the United States.

A Detroit native, Saladin Ahmed is an Arab American science fiction and fantasy writer. In the past, his family has been target by Islamophobic bigots, including the burning of a community center that helped Arab immigrants. His family founded that center.

Ahmed joined us today.

Congresswoman Debbie Dingell
Atlantic Council / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Pundits and pollsters are trying to figure out how they miscalled the presidential race. So many were nearly certain Hillary Clinton would win.

In a Washington Post opinion piece Member of Congress Debbie Dingell, a Democrat, says she knew Clinton was in trouble. She said so at the time. Her fellow Democrats didn’t listen.

Flickr user rgmcfadden / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Donald Trump’s victory sent people to their favorite social media platform to express their thoughts, fears and hopes as our divided nation tries to figure out what’s next.

A Facebook post from Michigan filmmaker Amy Weber asked each side to open up to the other.

“We will brush off our bruised hearts and open our arms to LOVE for ALL people and join together, because we MUST. Let’s use our powerful voices to educate and break down the walls that divide us.”

Weber is a lesbian mother and she said when Donald Trump was elected, she felt afraid.

Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs (left) and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems
Photos courtesy of T.J. Bucholz and Matt Marsden

America needs some healing.

The long, hard, bitter campaign left deep divisions and many are wondering what it will take to bring us together as Americans -- to give us a sense of being on the same team.

Is that even possible in 2016?

To make sense of it all, Democratic strategist T.J. Bucholz of Vanguard Public Affairs and Republican strategist Matt Marsden with RevSix Data Systems joined Stateside to break it all down.

There will no longer be any plus-size clothes departments at Meijer stores.
Mike Kalasnik / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

For the many American women who wear a plus-size, shopping for clothes can be an unhappy experience. The plus-size clothing is in a separate department, which leads some shoppers to feel singled out, and prices for plus-sizes can be higher than standard sized clothing.

The STEMinista Project is active in Southeast Michigan right now, but Matthews told us it's getting a lot of national attention and she could easily see its reach expanding.
Texas A&M University-Commerce Marketing Communications Photography / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Next Idea

It’s clear that Michigan’s economic future depends on turning out graduates who are strong in STEM skills - science, technology, engineering and math.

Attracting and keeping girls in STEM fields is the mission of The STEMinista Project, founded by Michigan Science Center chief executive officer and president, Dr. Tonya Matthews.

Trump rally in Newtown, Pennsylvania.
user Michael Candelori / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

“The Rust Belt revenge.”

That’s how Detroit News Business columnist Daniel Howes views the Election Day surprise that put Donald Trump in the White House and secured both Houses of Congress for the Republican Party.

In Howes’ view, the Rust Belt vote came together as a many-throated cry of “Listen to us!”

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

As president of the College Republicans at the University of Michigan, Enrique Zalamea worked hard to get out the vote for Donald Trump.

He said Trump represents the American, Christian and Republican values he believes in.

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