Stateside

Monday through Friday @ 3:00 p.m. & 10 p.m.

Conversations about what matters in Michigan.

Stateside covers a wide range of Michigan news and policy issues — as well as culture and lifestyle stories. In keeping with Michigan Radio’s broad coverage across southern Michigan, Stateside focuses on topics and events that matter to people all across the state. Stateside is hosted by Cynthia Canty (Mon-Thu) and Lester Graham (Fri). 

  • The way civilians talk to veterans matters. But what about the way we talk about them? Jason Hale is a veteran of two wars, and he has a message for the media: we’re not all broken.
  • Ann Arbor-based writer Rebecca Scherm joins us to discuss “Unbecoming,” her first novel.
  • More than 20,000 youth around the country age out of foster care every year.
  • As newsrooms get smaller, and more people hop online for information, will the industry be able to reinvent itself and keep up with the times? Why should we care about the decline of newspapers in Michigan? We discuss the state of the newspaper industry
  • Everyone says a dog is a man’s best friend.
  • More economists are telling us that the gap between the haves and the have-nots is growing in America. Michigan State University economist Charles Ballard joined us to talk about this.
  • Emily St. John Mandel joins us in-studio to talk about her novel Station Eleven, set in post-apocalyptic Northern Michigan.

Do you say Meijer or Meijer’s?

A lot of us have a real habit of adding that possessive "s" to a store or company’s name. Is it just a Michigan thing?

Is it art or just a mess? You had a few thoughts.

Carson Brown wants to make people think critically about what he calls the American landscape, and he’s not talking about mountains and vistas.

  • When we talk in Michigan about "food insecurity" and "food deserts," it's usually about Detroit, Flint and cities battling poverty.
Roots are one of Chef Young's favorite offerings this time of year
flickr user Ruth Hartnup

Alex Young is the James Beard Award-winning chef at Zingerman’s Roadhouse in Ann Arbor and the founder of Cornman Farms in Dexter.

He’s cooked all over the world, and really loves fall and early winter in Michigan.

Anne Curzan
University of Michigan

It’s nearly the end of the year, and we’re seeing all sorts of end-of-the-year lists, including Word of the Year.

Anne Curzan is an English professor at the University of Michigan and co-host of That’s What They Say, and she joins us today to go over some of the words in the running for Word of the Year.

  • Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta join us to talk about what the legislature accomplished, what it didn’t get done, and of course the Courser-Gamrat distraction.

  • A major obstacle to buying a house is getting a mortgage. Anna Clark’s article for Next City claims redlining is alive, well and dangerous in Detroit.

Muslims hold a vigil in Royal Oak in response to attacks in Libya
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

In the U.S., random attacks against Muslims – or people the attackers think look like Muslims – are on the rise. Michigan is not exempt.

In her recent article for The Islamic Monthly, Michigan public school teacher Zeinab Chami wonders why, 14 years after the most significant incident of violence in the name of Islam ever, we are now seeing more vitriolic comments against Islam – not fewer.

The article is called The Prayer of the American Muslim. That prayer: “Please, God, don’t let them be Muslim.”

Ian Freimuth/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Detroit is often called the comeback city by politicians and boosters. The central business district is recovering. But many of the neighborhoods are still struggling. There are a lot of empty houses. If they don’t sell, they’ll quickly become derelict, blighted, another problem.

A major obstacle to buying a house is getting a traditional mortgage.

What is a true cappuccino?

Dec 22, 2015
Guido Gloor Modjib/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Pour-over method. Water quality. Solid extraction. The world of specialty coffee-making can seem a lot like chemistry class. 

This December some baristas may actually feel like they're in class as the Specialty Coffee Association of America is certifying coffee professionals this month. 

Todd & Brad Reed Photography

If there was ever any doubt about the beauty of Michigan, the new book Michigan: Wednesdays in the Mitten will convince your out-of-state friends they need to visit.

Ranging from some of the state’s most pristine natural areas to images of downtown celebrations, the father and son team of Todd and Brad Reed capture it in their new book. 

"Michigan has a story to tell and we love to help tell that story," said Brad Reed.

Dan Varner
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

The Next Idea

Many of Detroit’s potential workers are leaving school without the math or reading skills required to enter training programs.

There doesn’t seems to be a clear plan for educating Detroit’s children. There doesn’t seem to be a clear plan for training a future workforce.

  • Rick Pluta and Jake Neher join us to talk about new legislation heading to Gov. Rick Snyder's desk that would, among other things, put an end to straight-ticket voting in Michigan.
Inside the Michigan Senate
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Legislation that would eliminate the straight-ticket voting option on Michigan ballots is headed to Gov. Rick Snyder’s desk.

Rick Pluta, co-host of It’s Just Politics and the Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network, tells us that if signed, this legislation would have three effects:

Cobo Center Press Release

The Cobo Center has a new pair of big, electronic billboards. They’re part of Cobo’s $300 million renovation plan, and according to Daniel Howes, they’re wrapped up in an example of “stupid government writ large."

With modern, accurate maps, it's clear how Michigan came to be known as "the Mitten State"
Ryan Grimes

It’s not hard to see why Michigan is often referred to as “the Mitten State,” but it is a little more difficult to figure out when folks actually started calling it that.

Stateside production assistant Cass Adair tells us he became curious about Michigan’s nickname over a Thanksgiving trip to Tennessee.

Flickr/Penn State / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Next Idea

It’s that time of year to reflect on what worked and what didn’t this past year here in the Great Lakes State, and to give due consideration to potential adjustments to improve our situation.  

Considering the essays and interviews of our guests here at The Next Idea, other credible news sources, and adding some of my own observations, I see three general areas for innovation to consider for review:

Christine Cha

If you’re already getting tired of the same old Christmas tunes this year, look no further than a new album called Creole Christmas. It’s by trumpet player and Michigan State University jazz professor, Etienne Charles.

The album combines, jazz, soul, and Creole music into a holiday mix with both instrumental tracks and vocal tracks that put a soulful spin on some standards, like Go Tell It on the Mountain and This Christmas to some holiday songs from Trinidad that you’ve probably never heard of.

A Minute with Mike: Move the Holidays

Dec 16, 2015
Vic Reyes

Even if you're a devout atheist, the end of December can be quite stressful. There's a lot of expectations to fulfill in a limited amount of time.

 

Can a Detroit start-up curb gun violence?

Dec 16, 2015
After three years in development, the smart gun lock should be ready for distribution in early 2016, says Identilock inventor Omer Kiyani.
Courtesy of Identilock

The Next Idea

How do we keep guns out of the wrong hands?

No matter where you stand on the gun issue, we can all agree that’s an important issue to address.

It’s also the question driving the Identilock, a smart gun lock that uses fingerprint identification to make sure a gun can only be used by its owner.

Omer Kiyani is the founder and CEO of Sentinl, the Detroit-based company behind Identilock.

  • The water crisis in Flint has caused the city's children to be poisoned by lead. But don't think the lead problem is confined to Flint. In his latest story for Bridge Magazine, Mike Wilkinson tells us lead remains an "irreversible scourge" in many areas across Michigan.
  • Lindsey Smith join us to talk about her upcoming documentary on the Flint water crisis, airing tomorrow. 
  • Auto dealerships are pretty firmly entrenched in our business landscape.
Lauren Dukoff

Michigan native Garrett Borns is better known by his stage name, BORNS. He recently released his debut album, Dopamine.

Before wrapping up his U.S. tour, BORNS will be performing at The Shelter in Detroit on Wednesday. 

He explains the song Electric Love is his contemporary take on '60s and '70s glam rock. BORNS talks about the influence his favorite musicians had on him, like Michael Jackson and Prince.

Since 1980, the number of black professors in America has risen from 4.1% to around 5%
flickr user DryHundredFear / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The recent student protests at the University of Missouri drew the nation’s attention to the problems of racism and lack of diversity on college campuses.

Faculty diversity – or, more accurately, the lack thereof – is certainly a concern on campuses in Michigan, both public and private.

For example, at Michigan State University, 4.4% of faculty members are black. The University of Michigan’s main campus trails with only 3.3%.

  • If you do an Internet search for "Great Lakes permaculture" or "Midwest permaculture," you'll soon discover a thriving movement in Michigan. Nate Ayers sits down to explain permaculture design.
  • Michigan writer R.J. Fox joins us to talk about how an amusement park ride lead him to love in the Ukraine.
Andrew3000 / flickr http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

To quote actor-writer-comedian Steve Martin: "A day without sunshine is like, you know, night."

Old man winter officially knocks down the seasonal door at 11:48 p.m. next Monday, December 21. The good news is that the days will start to get longer. The bad news:  it will be three months before the days, once again, become longer than night. 

If you are one of those Michiganders whose mood slides downhill as we slide into winter, you've got plenty of company. And it's all tied into the relationship among light, mood and melatonin.

R.J. Fox reading from "Love and Vodka"
screenshot

One of life’s greatest gifts is its ability to surprise us.

How could R.J. Fox know that going on the E.T. ride in Hollywood would lead him to the woman he’d want to marry? And from there, in the name of love, on to her home country Ukraine?

That’s where Fox was surprised by scowling old babushka-wearing ladies, a farmer who nearly beat him up for trying to photograph his goat, future in-laws he hoped to impress, and vodka. Lots and lots of vodka.

Fox tells the story in his new memoir Love and Vodka: My Surreal Adventures in Ukraine.

Don Harrison/flickr / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The largest ski jump structure in the world is located, not in Bavaria, not in Switzerland, not even Scandinavia.

It's Ironwood's Copper Peak in the Upper Peninsula. At 469 feet, ski jumpers soar through the air at 65 miles per hour.

Copper Peak was built in 1970. The last ski flying competition happened there in 1994.

But, plans are afoot to renovate the ski jump for a September 2017 contest.

Downtown Detroit
flickr user Tim Wang / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Today marks the one-year anniversary of Detroit’s exit from bankruptcy.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes sees a city on the mend, but with some heavy lifting ahead.

“I’m very impressed with the execution of the government under Mike Duggan and the City Council,” Howes says. He adds that the demonstrated stability in the police department and the business community’s continued resolve to stand by its investment in Detroit bode well for the city.

  • Today marks the one-year anniversary of Detroit's exit from bankruptcy. Daniel Howes sees a city on the mend, but with some heavy lifting ahead.

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