AIDS

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Health officials across the state are urging people to get tested for HIV. Monday is World AIDS Day.

There are an estimated 21,300 people living with HIV in the state, according to Michigan’s Department of Community Health. The number of diagnoses outpaces deaths associated with the virus, so the number of people living with HIV is up.  

MDCH reports an average of 809 new cases were diagnosed each year from 2008 to 2012.

Almost two-thirds of those living with the virus live in metro Detroit. The impact on black males is the greatest.

A lot of attention is showered on health concerns such as heart disease and cancer. There's much less attention and effort being directed to something that is the cause of more than half of all hospital deaths: sepsis. Sepsis accounts for more deaths than prostate cancer, breast cancer and AIDS combined.  Dr Jack Iwashyna  is an associate professor in the Pulmonary and Critical Care Division of the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan - and Marianne Udow-Phillips directs the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation.  Hear our interview with them below. 

Michigan awards $2.5 million for HIV-AIDS prevention

Feb 5, 2013
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The state of Michigan today awarded $2.5 million for HIV-AIDS prevention and intervention in urban communities throughout the state.

Some of the cities that will directly benefit from the fund include: Detroit, Kalamazoo, Dearborn, Ypsilanti, Saginaw, Lansing, Ferndale, Grand Rapids, Muskegon, and Flint.

I can only imagine, thinking you might have been exposed to HIV might be one of the scariest things of a person’s life.  Am I infected?  Will I get AIDS? 

Even more traumatic, is contracting it because you were sexually assaulted.

David—not his real name— says he was at a bar one night late in 2009.  He was hoping for a ride home.  He ended up at another man’s house and they had sex.  David says it was unwanted, that it was sexual assault.

“He doesn’t think he assaulted me.  So, uhm.  But, he was going to against my will.”

hitthatswitch / Creative Commons

Clean Works Needle Exchange began ten years ago. At the time it was very controversial for Grand Rapids city commissioners to adopt local laws that would give drug users access to clean syringes.

Tami VandenBerg leads the non-profit that runs the Clean Works Needle Exchange. She says they provide clean needles for about 600 people a year.