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american health care act

A piggy bank, stethescope and bundle of one dollar bills
401(k) 2013 / Flickr

Returning from the 4th of July recess, Senate Republicans are going to try again to come up with a health care bill that can win the 50 votes it needs to pass.

Word is, they hope to have a revised health bill to show senators by week's end, perhaps by Thursday.

The uncertain future of the Affordable Care Act is likely influencing some of the health care rate increases.
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Health insurance costs are going up next year. By a lot. How much depends on the Trump administration and Congress.

Blue Cross plans to raise insurance rates for plans it offers through the Affordable Care Act by an average of about 27% for individuals and close to 14% for Blue Care Network plans. The Detroit News reports another insurer, Priority Health, is proposing a nearly 18% hike for individuals buying through the Affordable Care Act. But, the rate hikes could be even higher.

Images Money on Flickr / Creative Commons

New data from a nonpartisan think tank says Michigan would hit a financial stumbling block if the Republican replacement for the Affordable Care Act passes.

The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities says the new health care bill would cost Michigan more than $582 million to maintain expansion in the next four years, and more than $1 billion by 2023. 

Money with bottle of pills
Images Money / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The stalled Republican replacement for the Affordable Care Act cleared a big hurdle this week. Lawmakers in the U.S. House passed the bill -- thanks in part to a last minute addition from Michigan Congressman Fred Upton. This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about Upton's amendment and what the bill could mean for Michigan.

They also discuss a state Court of Appeals ruling that teachers can drop out of their union whenever they like, another attempt by lawmakers to scrap and replace pensions for new teachers, and budget proposals that passed the state House and Senate this week. 

RNC Chair Ronna Romney McDaniel holding a microphone
www.migop.org

Republican National Committee chair Ronna Romney McDaniel was in Lansing Friday. Her visit comes on the heels of a controversial health care vote.

Democrats fought the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. They say the Republican plan that would replace it has worse coverage and would cost millions their healthcare coverage. 

Romney McDaniel says the new plan will save American lives.

Surgeons operating on patient in operating room
Phalinn Ooi / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

On Thursday, the U.S. House approved a new health care policy designed by Republicans representatives to replace Obamacare. Each one of Michigan’s Republican representatives voted in favor of the replacement bill, while no Democrats (in Michigan or any other state) gave the bill their support.

Michigan Republicans were likewise united in the condemnation of Obamacare – also known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Representative Tim Walberg, for instance, said, “Obamacare is on the brink of collapse and has failed to live up to its many promises.”

Representative John Moolenar called the ACA, “the collapsing health care law.”

Not everyone agrees with those assessments.

Unless you spent yesterday in a salt mine, you know that the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill radically altering the Affordable Care Act.

If you don’t know exactly what’s in this bill, or how it would affect you, you are not alone. Neither did virtually any of the members of congress, all of them Republicans, who voted for this bill, which they are calling the American Health Care Act.

Doctor's office
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Relieved Republicans have pushed their prized health care bill through the House. The mostly party-line 217-213 vote advances a bill that addresses their longtime pledge to erase the 2010 Obama health care law.

“Today, I voted to keep the promise I made to the voters of my district to rescue Americans from the collapsing health care law that has raised premiums and deductibles and replace it with a better health care system,” says Rep. John Moolenaar, R-Midland.

A sign protesting the House bill that seeks to repeal the Affordable Care Act.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Protestors gathered outside U.S. Rep. David Trott's (R-11th district) office in southeast Michigan today.

The group has a simple demand: that Trott  vote against a Republican bill that would repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Although Trott was not at his office during the protest, a spokesman allowed protestors to air their grievances, two at a time.  

The American Healthcare Act has a provision that lowers protections for people with preexisting conditions.

Rian Saunders / Flickr, http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

As you probably know, the Republican Party is in control of all three branches of Michigan government – executive, legislative and judicial. Republicans also control both houses of Congress and the Presidency.

Democrats are, naturally, not happy about this.

Protestors in Detroit stand on Woodward Avenue with signs showing their disapproval of President Trump and the GOP's American Healthcare Act.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Protestors marched in downtown Detroit today for what was called a – seven years from the day the ACA was first signed into law.

 

 

Many of the protestors said they're afraid they and others will lose their health insurance coverage if Obamacare is repealed.

 

 

Henrietta Ivey, a home care physician in Detroit, spoke at the march on behalf one of her patients who is in rehab due to kidney issues. 

 

 

“If he didn’t have that Affordable Care Act, he would not be able to get the care and rehab that he’s having right now,”

A hospital emergency room entrance.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

You'll be able to buy the health care insurance plan you want. Premiums will be lower. Everyone will be covered. Access to quality, affordable care will improve.

Those promises from President Donald Trump and Republican leaders like Speaker Paul Ryan seem less likely after a report from the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office (CBO).