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Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Courtesy of Emma Weinstein

On Sunday, there will be a staged reading of a new play called Come My Beloved. It's described as being about race, intimacy, and Detroit.

The play chronicles a Friday night in the lives of three black and Jewish couples at different points in time.

The playwright and director is Emma Weinstein, and she joined Stateside today.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

You don’t have to have a password, or pull a secret lever, or push a button for entry, but the Sidebar in Grand Rapids definitely has that speakeasy feel. The address is available: 80 Ottawa Avenue NW, but finding it is a little tricky. Hint: go down the steps toward the pizza place.

Wystan / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCl0

104 years ago this month, some 400 miners and their families were at a Christmas Eve celebration in Calumet in the Upper Peninsula. 73 men, women and children would not live to see Christmas Day.

We know this tragedy as the Italian Hall Disaster and the 1913 Massacre, born out of the depths of a long and bitter miners' strike.

Tiffany Brown with two other women
Courtesy of Tiffany Brown

There’s so much renovation and new development happening in Detroit. But how many of the people designing these spaces are the people who will end up using them?

That’s the question that drives Tiffany Brown.

She is an architectural designer who won a 2017 Knight Arts Challenge grant for her idea to bring more black girls and women into the field of architecture and urban planning. Her winning project is called 400 Forward.

Today on Stateside, we discuss why the heat on MSU has gone from "zero to 100." We also talk to subjects of the new documentary on Flint that looks for "inspiration in the wake of desperation." And, we answer this MI Curious question: Why do so many international Olympic figure skaters train in Michigan?

“Inspiration in the wake of desperation.” That’s the theme of a powerful documentary called For Flint.

In the film, director Brian Schulz shows the foundation for a rebuilt Flint can be found in the lives of its neighbors.

Jeremy Daniel

There's no shortage of Christmas productions this season. And, as always, David Kiley of Encore Michigan tells about a few of the latest happening around the state. 

Listen above to hear his take on the following:

There's examples all over the the place of people using "there's" before a plural noun. In fact, we just gave you one.

A listener named Bill from Kalamazoo recently wrote to us about this. He's noticed all kinds of people, including broadcasters, using "there's" in front of words that refer to multiple things such as "thousands" or "many" instead of using "there are."

He says, "As an old guy, it drives me crazy. Especially when said by a 'professional' who should know better."

Bill, all we can say is guilty as charged.


There is just so much to process, so much to, well, not to sound old, but growing up we just never would have anticipated this level craziness.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint residents are celebrating the reopening of a downtown landmark.

The Capitol Theatre has been closed for nearly 20 years.

But thanks to a $37 million restoration, the theater is once again opening its doors.

“What makes this building special actually is the connection that the community has had with it for nine decades,” says Jarret Haynes, the executive director of the Whiting theater, which will manage the Capitol Theatre.

The New Press, 2017

There are accepted historical “facts” which do not hold up to closer scrutiny. One of those is that slavery was something that happened in the South, not the North. That is simply wrong.

A new book examines examples of Northern slavery, focusing on the early days of Detroit.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Earlier this year, Stateside traveled to Plymouth to visit Planet Marimba. That’s the workshop of Matt Kazmierski. It’s actually the garage at his home. When we arrived, he was working on a practice marimba which basically is a scaled back marimba with no resonator which makes it quieter.

If you’re a college music student, getting into a studio to practice can be a challenge. But, if you’ve got a practice marimba, you can practice at home and not disturb the neighbors.

Courtesy of Tasha Stielstra

Many call skiing to mind, or ice skating, when thinking about winter in Michigan. A growing number of Michiganders, however, envision a team of dogs pulling a sled through snow-covered forests and fields.

Dog sledding is getting more popular in Michigan, with more and more people seeking out places like Nature’s Kennel Sled Dog Racing & Adventures in McMillan, in the Upper Peninsula.

Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Tuesday marked the release of NPR's Book Concierge List, an annual book guide produced by NPR critics, reporters, and member stations.

To accompany that list, Michigan Radio has compiled a list of our book reviews from 2017. 

Check it out below!

This month, we’ll look back at three of 2017’s “Under-the-Radar” albums by West Michigan bands; three terrific recordings folks might have overlooked.

The Turnips - StopWatchTimeDrop

Tamar Charney / NPR One

When I moved from Tennessee to Michigan, winter hit me like a ton of bricks, or maybe it was a full body ice cream headache.

Remember how winters used to be really, really cold? One day you’d wake up and there was no doubt – fall was gone. Winter had arrived. Suddenly the wind rushed straight from the arctic and smacked you in the face. Snow piled up around you, and your eyes stung from the cold.

What scares the living daylights out of you?

Maybe it's watching a scary movie in the dark by yourself. Maybe it's that dog down the street who makes Cujo look like Lassie.

Or maybe it's the thought of Stranger Things not coming back for a third season. (Relax, it totally is.)

Have you ever wondered though, what exactly is a "living daylight"? The answer is kind of violent.


Courtesy of latinosenmichigantv.com

Latinos En Michigan TV is a website and a YouTube channel that produces stories about events and issues around Michigan that might be of interest to Latinos and Hispanic people in the state.

Liliana Ospina, founder of Latinos En Michigan TV, joined Stateside to talk about how the channel is creating a better community for Michigan Latinos and Hispanic people.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

“It’s like Christmas in a glass,” said Tammy Coxen with Tammy’s Tastings.

She’s talking about a cocktail invented by the principle bartender at The Last Word craft cocktail bar in Ann Arbor, Giancarlo Aversa.

Courtesy of Sean Carter Photography

It's only fitting to begin Stateside's holiday edition of Theater Talk with a real tradition – the fact that the Meadow Brook Theatre in Rochester is offering A Christmas Carol and has done so for over 35 years.

Thomas Mahard plays Ebenezer Scrooge and has been with the show for over 30 years. Stateside host Cynthia Canty remembers interviewing him for her TV show back in the 1980s when he was playing Bob Cratchit.

will keith kellogg with horse
University of Michigan Medical School Center for the History of Medicine

A chirpy, cheery jingle from the 1960s was part of a massive advertising effort that helped Kellogg’s Corn Flakes become amazingly popular.  

Kellogg’s best to you” meant breakfast to countless families across America. Open that box of Kellogg’s Corn Flakes, or Rice Krispies, pour on the milk — and you've got breakfast.

Joey Schultz

Finding inspiration for writing and making music can be a challenge for songwriters. But, for Brandon and Bethany Foote it's the place they call home that fuels their imagination.

The duo known as Gifts or Creatures is out with their third full-length album, Fair Mitten (New Songs of the Historic Great Lakes Basin).

Their music celebrates the rich history and beauty of the upper Midwest.   

A new high school in Utah is worried about the plural form of their mascot, the phoenix.

Sure, "phoenixes" is perfectly innocuous. But parents were concerned about the other option: phoenices.

If you don't see the issue, go ahead and say that one out loud.

The school's principal said the team name would always be singular, similar to the Miami Heat or the Orlando Magic. Still, this got us wondering about other Latin plurals.


Amanda Saab / AmandasPlate.com

Thanksgiving is now less than a day away. For all you last-minute bakers out there with nothing to make, Amanda Saab has you covered.

She’s a No Kid Hungry food blogger, founder of Dinner with Your Muslim Neighbor, and was the first Muslim woman featured on the TV show MasterChef.

The new America the Great Cookbook includes Saab’s Baklava Cheesecake recipe – it’s what she bakes for the people she loves, like her husband Hussein and their 3-month-old daughter Hannah.

Stateside recently visited Saab’s kitchen in New Boston where her baklava cheesecake was in the works. We brought back the audio postcard above. Take a listen. Step by step, you’ll learn how to make the dessert.

Carl Wilson linoart print
Carl Wilson

It's funny how the smallest details about someone we love can stay with us.

For example: a scent. Any whiff of Shalimar instantly makes Cynthia Canty think of her great-Aunt Verne because it was her signature perfume.

For artist Carl Wilson, it's the memory of the chewing gum his mother always had in her purse — and that led to the title for his first solo museum exhibition.

Mixtape: DeJ Loaf, Anna Burch, and Rebecca Goldberg

Nov 21, 2017

Time for us to listen to some new music from Detroit area artists.

Our guides are Paul Young, founder and publisher of Detroit Music Magazine and executive editor Khalid Bhatti.

DeJ Loaf - “Changes”

Matthew Murphy

Right now, all over Michigan, countless high schools are putting on their fall theater productions. Acting in a school play can help a kid discover something she never knew she had inside. Someone who’s shy can somehow find the key to shining on stage, and it’s something that can change the course of her life.

That’s what happened for Teri Hansen, when she auditioned for a play at Seaholm High School in Birmingham.

How many usernames and passwords do you have these days?

You've got email, bank accounts, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Paypal, Amazon, Snapchat, Nextdoor, Ebay and probably at least two dozen other accounts that aren't listed here.

Remembering all the information we need to access our devices and accounts is nothing short of a challenge.

On top of that, we've got a spelling issue to contend with.


Today on Stateside, we hear how the USDA is working to regain trust of minority and female farmers. And, after thinking his career was over, Jeff Daniels explains he's now busier than ever. 

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

It’s pretty hard to live in Chelsea, Michigan and not know Jeff Daniels. He’s an accomplished actor both on stage and on screen, he’s a musician who frequently tours, and he founded the Purple Rose Theatre in Chelsea.

Daniels joined Stateside to explain what’s been keeping him so busy.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

When we talked with Babacar Lo of the Wicker Shop, the weather was still warm and Lo was in his backyard in Detroit, working. Under a tent and surrounded by potted plants, he was repairing rattan and wicker furniture, a skill he first encountered in his home country of Senegal.

“I did a little bit of weaving, making rattan and bamboo furniture in Africa just in my spare time,” Lo said.

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