Arts & Culture

Stateside
5:22 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

What would it take to make Detroit a new fashion hub?

Karen Buscemi, editor of StyleLine magazine.
blog.michiganadvantage.org

An interview with Karen Buscemi.

When you think “fashion,” what are the first cities to pop into your mind?

New York? London? Milan? Paris?

No one will dispute those cities’ claim to being fashion hubs.

But there’s a passionate group in the style and fashion community that says Detroit can be a fashion hub, and a great place for designers to make a mark.

Karen Buscemi is the editor of StyleLine magazine. She’s also the founder and managing partner of the Detroit Garment Group Guild. Their motto: “Keep Michigan Talent In Michigan.”

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Stateside
5:06 pm
Mon October 7, 2013

Three Michigan books to read this fall

Michigan poet and writer Keith Taylor.
Robert Turney

We've welcomed autumn here in Michigan, many of us with open arms. It is a beautiful season in our state.

And one of the pleasures of changing seasons is being able to talk with poet and writer Keith Taylor.

Keith joined us today with his picks for our autumn reading, books set-in Michigan written by Michigan authors. This time, he focused on writing from the Upper Peninsula.

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That's What They Say
8:08 am
Sun October 6, 2013

Some people orient and some people orientate

The word orient was back-formed from the word orientate. But do these phrases mean the same thing?

On this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, host Rina Miller and University of Michigan Professor of English Anne Curzan discuss the difference between orient and orientate, and other back-formed words.

The difference is more than whether the speaker is American or British.

“For me orient is about direction, I’m orienting myself as to whether I’m facing north or south,” Curzan explains.

“I hear orientate on campus. If I orientate someone, I’m getting them used to campus and telling them how to get things done there.”

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Arts & Culture
8:54 pm
Fri October 4, 2013

Quilt depicting Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore wins top prize at ArtPrize 2013

Ann Loveless from Frankfort, MI wins top prize, $200,000 for her landscape art quilt, Sleeping Bear Dune Lakeshore.
ArtPrize.org

Update 11:15 p.m.

A giant quilt depicting the Sleeping Bear National Lakeshore won the top prize in the Grand Rapids-based ArtPrize competition Friday night.

Ann Loveless, of Frankfort Michigan, made the quilt.

Past ArtPrize winners have included paintings, pencil drawings, and mosaics. This year’s is a super detailed quilt that looks like a photo of a fabulous sunset at the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore. It’s 20 feet wide and 5 feet tall.

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Arts & Culture
9:00 am
Fri October 4, 2013

New DIA exhibit on animation gets weird. And it's great.

It's animation, sure. But it's not always family friendly.
user aMichiganMom Flickr

This is not your five-year-old's animation.

Although you can certainly bring your five-year-old. They'll be right at home in the exhibits' dark halls lined with screen after screen after screen, like a little iPad addict's paradise.

"Watch Me Move" is, according to the Detroit Institute of  Arts, the  largest animation exhibition ever mounted.

And when you exit, you'll feel like it was both too short, and somehow way too vast to get a good grasp in just one visit.

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Arts & Culture
7:00 am
Thu October 3, 2013

When a wounded vet designs clothing, it looks like this

Tyler Way and Michael Hyacinthe, co-founders of Fashion Has Heart.
Kate Wells Michigan Radio

When a veteran comes home from war with an obvious injury, like a missing arm, they know they'll have to talk about it.

Some vets get so used to telling that war wound story, it becomes almost routine.

What’s harder to talk about, and to understand, are the invisible injuries.

That's why a nonprofit called Fashion Has Heart is pairing wounded vets with graphic designers.

Together, they create t-shirts and combat boots that reflect each vet's experience.

And right now they’re on display at ArtPrize, where anybody can buy - and wear - the results.

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Stateside
4:43 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Author revisits crime and corruption of yesteryear in 'Detroit Shuffle'

A map of Detroit from 1923, around the time author D.E. Johnson writes about in "Detroit Shuffle."
user davecito Flickr

Corruption. Political shenanigans. Murder. 

That may sound like life in a big city in 2013. 

But Kalamazoo-based writer D.E. Johnson says think again. His latest novel is set in the Detroit of 1912. From his research, there was plenty of crime and corruption happening in those good old days. 

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Arts & Culture
5:05 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Yes, even ArtPrize affected by potential federal shutdown

Anni Crouter is in the top 10, and she won't let a government shutdown stand in her way of winning.
ArtPrize ArtPrize

The Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and Museum's employees have been "busting their tails" to make ArtPrize go smoothly, in the words of one ArtPrize organizer.

It's their big spotlight: last year, some 195,000 visitors trooped through the museum to check out the ArtPrize entries housed in the Ford. Even more visitors are expected this year, according to one museum official.

But now, with a government shutdown just hours away, the Ford museum could go dark at midnight tonight.

And two of Artprize's top 10 finalists are still on display in the museum.

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Stateside
4:31 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Livingston County is getting a pinball museum

Flickr user Needle Flickr

Clay Harrell has made saving pinball machines from the scrap heap his mission.

He has been collecting, repairing, and restoring pinball machines -- rescuing unwanted old machines and bringing them back to their former glory.

Now he’s moving his formidable pinball collection into a vacant VFW Hall in Green Oak Township in Livingston County. There he plans to create a private museum of pinball machines.

Clay Harrell joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
3:38 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

AP reporter becomes a singer-songwriter-musician in his off hours

Jeff Karoub
Twitter

His name is Jeff Karoub. You've heard him here on Stateside in his role as an Associated Press reporter covering the Detroit area.

But today, we met a "different" Jeff Karoub. We met the singer-songwriter-musician who has just won a grant from the Knight Foundation for a project he calls "Coming Home To Music."

Jeff Karoub joined us in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
7:33 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Top 10 finalists of ArtPrize announced

Tired Panda is one of this year's 10 finalists
Artprize

Hundreds of people flooded downtown Grand Rapids over the weekend to hear the top 10 finalists of this year’s ArtPrize announced.

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Arts & Culture
9:13 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Electronic musician inspired by family & place

"If I couldn't make music, I would not be a happy person."
Shigeto/Facebook

Michigan has a history of some pretty sweet music. One surprising genre that is Pure Michigan is techno. The art form was invented by three young men from Belleville in the 1980s (specifically Kevin Saunderson, Derrick May, and Juan Atkins, aka the Belleville 3, and you can listen to some classic Detroit techno here).

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That's What They Say
8:35 am
Sun September 29, 2013

What is acceptable, or not, in English?

It's that time again! The time of year when editors at The American Heritage Dictionary send out ballots filled with questions asking what is acceptable, or not, in English.

On this edition of That’s What They Say, Host, Rina Miller and University of Michigan Professor of English, Anne Curzan talk about some of the questions that came up on the usage ballot this year.

Question #1:

It is okay to use nauseous as causing nausea? Example: That was a nauseous rollercoaster.

Curzan says, “At this point nauseous means feeling nauseated not causing nausea. I think nauseous can sometimes mean offensive, but for the most part I think it means that we feel terrible.”

Question #2:

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Arts & Culture
7:35 am
Fri September 27, 2013

Laughing matters at Arab-American comedy festival in Dearborn

A new festival will feature comedians from Arab-American and other minority backgrounds. 

The 1001 Laughs Dearborn Comedy Festival happens September 27 and 28 at the Arab American National Museum in Dearborn.

Amer Zahr is the festival's producer and he'll also be performing a few sets.

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Stateside
5:16 pm
Wed September 25, 2013

The St. Louis Symphony Orchestra to perform a piece by University of Michigan music student

Composer Patrick Harlin
Twitter

Imagine for a moment, you’re a student at the University of Michigan. A music student. And you compose a piece and suddenly find a major orchestra decides to perform your work. Kind of a dream come true, huh?

Well, that’s the reality Patrick Harlin is living. He is working on his Doctor of Musical Arts degree at U of M, and his composition “Rapture” will be performed by the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra later this month.

Patrick Harlin joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
4:32 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Author explores family secrets in the new autobiographical memoir: Annie's Ghosts

This year’s Great Michigan Read selection is Annie’s Ghosts: A Journey into a Family Secret, by Steve Luxenberg.

The autobiographical memoir tells the story of one man’s surprising discovery of his aunt, Annie, who he only learns of after his mother’s death. This is a fascinating read: its part mystery story, part family history and part exploration, as the author relearns who his mother and aunt really were.

This week, host Jennifer White talks with the author, Steve Luxenberg about why it was important for him to write such an intimate story about his family.

“My mother had a secret, which she kept her entire life. She didn’t tell her children that she had a sister who was institutionalized for 31 years at a Michigan Hospital called Eloise. When we found out about this, I needed to re-imagine my mother and my entire family story because when my mom was growing up she told elaborate stories about how she was an only child. Those stories turned out not to be true," Luxenberg said.

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Arts & Culture
1:01 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Listen to this hilarious story from a Detroit comedian featured on The Moth Radio Hour

Detroit comic Horace H.B. Sanders
Liz Mackinder The Moth

A Detroit comedian is featured in this week’s episode of The Moth Radio Hour.

Back when he was 12, Horace H.B. Sanders, a stand-up comic from the Motor City, showed up to a costume party in his homemade ninja costume.

Turns out, he was the only one who dressed up for the party.

Listen to Sander’s hilarious story, recorded at a Grand Slam in Detroit.

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Stateside
4:22 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Michigan wines are getting some love across the country

Vineyard in Leelanau County
user farlane flickr

Go to New York. Visit a nice restaurant. And, you just might find yourself looking over the wine list and find an entry that might be surprise you. A Michigan wine.

The Chief Restaurant Critic and Wine Writer for Hour Magazine, Chris Cook recently wrote about that surprise, and he joined us today to talk Michigan wines.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
11:45 am
Mon September 23, 2013

What happens when you fake your own death?

Charlie Rowan was a mixed martial arts cage fighter before he faked his own death.
user: fightlaunch Flickr

In a recent article from the New York Times, writer Mary Pilon wrote an expansive narrative about a man who faked his own death.

"Tomato Can Blues" focuses on Charlie Rowan, a relatively unknown cage fighter from Gladwin, Michigan. He was fairly active in mixed martial arts, which combined jujitsu, kickboxing, karate, and other disciplines. The fights were short, and pretty brutal. 

But here's the twist. When Rowan was really tight on money and didn't know where to go, he pretended to die. Or rather, he had his girlfriend tell everyone he died. 

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That's What They Say
8:52 am
Sun September 22, 2013

How 8 buffaloes in a row form a sentence

It seems hard to believe that if you put 8 buffaloes in a row, you can get a grammatical sentence.

On this week’s edition of That’s What They Say, host Rina Miller and Professor of English at the University of Michigan Anne Curzan talk about homonyms, or words that sound the same but have different meanings. 

Obviously, saying buffalo 8 times in row does not sound like a sentence. But, technically the sentence is grammatically correct although not readily understandable. It helps to recognize that we are talking about buffalo the animals that happen to be from the city of Buffalo. These buffalo sometimes buffalo as a verb. The verb buffalo can mean to outwit, bully, or trick.

If we substitute buffalo for the words bison and trick, the sentence will go like this:

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