Arts & Culture

Arts & Culture
4:21 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

First Listen: Mayer Hawthorne, 'Where Does This Door Go'

Mayer Hawthorne's new album, Where Does This Door Go, comes out July 16.
Jeremy Deputat Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 7:46 am

In the course of three studio albums, Michigan-bred soul singer Mayer Hawthorne has refined his gift for songs that emulate and update his home state's Motown sound.

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Arts & Culture
2:29 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Detroit stars in new Google Maps ad

A screen cap of the new Google Maps ad, featuring Detroit.
Google Maps YouTube

An ad for the new Google Maps app gives some love to the Motor City.


Comerica Park, L.J.’s Lounge in Corktown, Lafayette Coney Island, and even the People Mover make appearances in the new ad, released by Google today.Of course, "Detroit Rock City," Kiss's homage to Motown, serves as the commercial's soundtrack. 


Check out the ad here:

- Melanie Kruvelis, Michigan Radio Newsroom

Arts & Culture
1:29 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Local magazine shows stories of hope in neglected neighborhoods

A collage from the Model D's "On the Ground" summer series.
Model D

A magazine in Detroit is looking to get a new perspective on the Motor City

Model D is a digital magazine that’s been covering Detroit culture, development, and lack thereof since 2005. Now the small-staffed magazine is starting a new project: starting a summer-long series based in Osborn, a community in northwest Detroit.
From Model D’s Claire Nelson:

“What happens when we hang out in a Detroit neighborhood for a period of 90 days? Who will we meet? What will we learn? Can we eat enough at Capers Steakhouse to get some sort of discount?”

(Capers is an eastside joint known for selling its steaks by the ounce.)

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Culture
6:00 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Ramadan starts today for Muslims in North America

A crecent moon over palm trees at sunset in Manama, Bahrain in 2006. It marked the beginning of the Muslim month of Ramadan for that year.
user Ahmed Rabea Flickr

I was traveling in Indonesia when I first experienced Ramadan. I was wondering why so many people at the McDonald's in Surabaya were sitting at the table, wrappers open, waiting to eat their Big Macs.

It was the holy month of Ramadan, and they were waiting until just after sunset - for the iftar - the meal that breaks the day-long fast.

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Stateside
5:51 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

South Manitou Island prepares for special lighthouse tours

Sleeping Bear Dunes was voted "The Most Beautiful Place in America" on ABC's Good Morning America.
Danielle Lynch Flickr

An interview with Pat Kelly, granddaughter of the longest-serving lighthouse keeper on South Manitou Island.

To many in Michigan and the tourists who visit, the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore is one of the most beautiful parts of "Pure Michigan." In fact, ABC’s Good Morning America called the Sleeping Bear Dunes the most beautiful place in America.

Part of that National Lakeshore is South Manitou Island. And some people with very special ties to South Manitou Island have been very busy getting the place spruced up and polished for a special day tomorrow.

Pat Kelly is the granddaughter of James Putnam-Burdick, who was the longest-serving lighthouse keeper on South Manitou Island, and she joined us today from South Manitou's ranger station.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:46 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

Garages should not be used as living spaces, according to Dearborn city officials

Dearborn city officials say they don't want garages to become "habitable" places for cooking/sleeping because garages aren't built to the same standards as the rest of a home
Flickr

An interview with Jeff Karoub of the Associated Press.

Should homeowners be allowed to do pretty much whatever they want with their garages, as long as it doesn't bother neighbors?

That's the essence of a growing debate in Dearborn, where a desire by some residents, largely Arab-Americans, to use their garages as living space is being met with resistance at City Hall and the prospect of tighter garage ordinances.

Jeff Karoub is with the Associated Press, covering issues pertinent to the Arab-Muslim community, and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:06 pm
Tue July 9, 2013

MSU student produces documentary dedicated to casualties of Operation Enduring Freedom

Logan Stark is the producer of the documentary "For the 25."
Twitter

An interview with former Marine sniper Logan Stark.

In October 2010, the 3rd Battalion 5th Marines deployed to Afghanistan. They were sent to relieve the British Royal Marines in the southern Helmand Province, a hotbed of insurgent fighters and IEDs.

Twenty-five Marines in the 3rd Battalion 5th Marines did not come home.

One of those who did come home went on to become a student at Michigan State University. Former Marine sniper Logan Stark is now a senior in MSU's Professional Writing Program.

As a class project, Logan formed a three-member team that produced a documentary called "For the 25" dedicated to his fallen brothers in the "Dark Horse" battalion, which suffered the highest number of casualties in 2010 during Operation Enduring Freedom.

Logan Stark joined us in the studio today.

You can watch "For the 25" below.

Listen to the full interview above.

That's What They Say
8:55 am
Sun July 7, 2013

Marked nouns: a hit at gender equality?

On this week’s edition of “That’s What They Say,” host Rina Miller and Professor of English at the University of Michigan Anne Curzan discuss the irksome “ess” added to the end of nouns to indicate a female in words like authoress, actress and governess.

These “ess” words are ubiquitous in the English language. But do we really need them? And does the distinction in fact diminish the word’s meaning? This practice in linguistics is called markedness.

Markedness is about an asymmetry in, for example, a pair of words where one is a more neutral term - the dominant term, and one is marked somehow - it’s specialized,” says Anne Curzan.

Examples include authoress versus the unmarked author, or actor versus actress. In these examples, there’s arguably no difference between the marked and neutral term beside the "ess" added to indicate the noun is female. However, as Curzan explains, history has had a pejoration of the marked word due to sexism in the past.

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Arts & Culture
6:01 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Finding Meaning In The Mosh Pit Among Often-Reviled Groupies

Shaggy 2 Dope, left, and Violent J make of the rap duo Insane Clown Posse, seen here in their stage makeup in 1999.
Joseph Cultice AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 12:49 pm

The bands Phish and Insane Clown Posse have spawned some of the most rabid fans in music history. Their world of obsession is not an easy one to break into, but on a warm December night in Miami back in 2009, pop culture writer Nathan Rabin went to see a concert that would inspire him to enter the orbit of these infamous groupies.

He wrote a book about them, You Don't Know Me But You Don't Like Me, and tells weekends on All Things Considered guest host Rebecca Sheir about his first-hand look at the two often-reviled sub-cultures.

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Arts & Culture
1:42 pm
Sat July 6, 2013

Kalamazoo Institute of Arts leader set to retire

KALAMAZOO, Mich. (AP) - The Kalamazoo Institute of Arts executive director has announced his retirement after 23 years, but will remain on the job until a successor is hired.

The Kalamazoo Gazette reports that it could take up to a year to replace Jim Bridenstine. He is an art historian who earned his bachelor's degree from The College of Holy Cross in 1967 and a master's in the History of Art from George Washington University in 1975. He completed Harvard University's Institute of Arts Administration program in 1978.

Culture
8:00 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Happy Birthday, Michigan Radio! Celebrating 65 years of public service broadcasting

Celebrating 65 years of broadcasting.
Credit Michigan Radio

Sixty-five years ago today, WUOM aired its first broadcast from temporary studios in Angell Hall on the campus of the University of Michigan.

U of M was one of the first educational institutions to apply for an FM license. The station's first broadcast went on out on the brand new, high fidelity FM band at 91.7. It has been broadcasting on this signal ever since. Today, the station broadcasts on two more signals (WVGR 104.1 FM in Grand Rapids, and WFUM 91.1 FM in Flint).

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Culture
12:39 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Michigan’s oldest consecutive Independence Day parade marks nearly eight decades

People watch the 79th annual Hollyhock Lane Independence Day parade in Grand Rapids.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

People are celebrating Independence Day today with parades in cities across the state.

Kids scrambled to grab laffy taffy. Politicians from both sides of the aisle wore tennis shoes and shook people’s hands.

Robbie McCollum watched from her backyard. She says the Hollyhock Lane Independence Day parade is the big summer event in Grand Rapids' Ottawa Hills neighborhood.

“The kids really look forward to it. Our children grew up riding in the parade. I remember when they celebrated 50 years. But I’ve lost track,” McCollum said.

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Stateside
4:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

The history of 4th of July celebrations

The Parade Company via theparade.org

An interview with author Bill Loomis.

With the 4th of July at hand, it's a good bet many of us have a backyard barbeque in our plans, maybe catching a fireworks show or doing one of your own in your backyard.

That got us thinking about the ways Michiganders have marked the big National Holiday over the centuries, and for that, we turn to our Official Stateside Historian.

Bill Loomis writes for the Detroit News and he's the author of "Detroit's Delectable Past: Two Centuries of Frog Legs, Pigeon Pie and Drugstore Whiskey." He joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:44 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

New memoir details the struggles of a single parent living on a farm in northern Michigan

Mardi Jo Link is the author of "Bootstrapper: A Memoir."
Facebook

An interview with author Mardi Jo Link.

One of the best things about sharing each other's stories is how we can learn from each other.

And especially as Michigan has weathered the Great Recession, so many people in our state have had to face challenging periods, times when money was tight when you dreaded finding another past-due notice in the mailbox or phone call from a creditor.

Then factor in the challenges of being a single parent trying to raise a family and stretch a dollar.

That's the story Mardi Jo Link shares in her new book: "Bootstrapper: A Memoir. From Broke to Badass on a Northern Michigan Farm," published by Knopf.

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Stateside
4:40 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Noise complaints led to prohibiting late-night fireworks in Michigan

Sarah Cwiek Michigan Radio

An interview with Andy Webb, owner of Captain Boom Fireworks in Otsego.

You don't have to look at the calendar to know the 4th of July is at hand. Just open your window and chances are you'll hear folks all over Michigan take advantage of the 2012 fireworks law, the one that allowed larger and louder fireworks to be sold and launched.

But the second year of the new state law may find things a little quieter. A raft of complaints prompted lawmakers to tweak the fireworks law, allowing local governments to ban overnight use of consumer grade fireworks on and around holidays.

Andy Webb, owner of Captain Boom Fireworks in Otsego, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Arts & Culture
1:53 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Detroit music landmark could be lost to I-94 expansion

The United Sound Systems building on Second Street in Detroit could be demolished in an I-94 expansion plan.
Credit DetroitWiki

The United Sound Systems building on Second Street in Detroit could be demolished in an I-94 expansion plan. The recording studio has a rich musical history dating back to the 1930s.

Artists such as Aretha Franklin, Marvin Gaye, Miles Davis and George Clinton have recorded there.

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Arts & Culture
5:24 pm
Tue July 2, 2013

ArtPod heads up north

Where to go? What to read? ArtPod's got you covered.
Bug_girl_mi Flickr

There’s nothing ArtPod hates more than humidity. Don’t even mention the word “frizz” right now.

And since so much of southern Michigan swings between flash flooding to feeling like a sauna, ArtPod is doing what all true Michiganders do: heading up north.

Specifically, Petoskey. And not just for the pretty bay views or the $5 kiddie-size gelato.  

Petoskey has a humming arts community in its own right, one that draws artists and art buyers from across Michigan, even out of state.

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Arts & Culture
12:10 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Part of an Irish Hills landmark coming down

A demolition crew is removing the two observation decks on top of the Irish Hills Towers
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Part of the iconic Irish Hills Towers in Lenawee County is being demolished this week.

Members of a small wrecking crew are slowly dismantling the two observation decks that top the six story tall wooden towers.   The work is expected to take a few days, depending in part on the weather. 

The towers have been a landmark along U-S Route 12 in southern Michigan since the 1920’s and they're on the National Register of Historic Places.  

But age and neglect have taken a toll in recent years.

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Stateside
5:27 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

What books should you consider reading this summer?

Flickr/Sarah Sosiak

An interview with writer and poet Keith Taylor.

Now that summer has truly taken us into her embrace, we’ve been thinking of some of our favorite summer pleasures. And it was fairly unanimous: one of the sweetest times of summer is lounging around in the sun, maybe on a beach, maybe your favorite spot on your back porch or yard, and in your hands is a good book.

Keith Taylor coordinates the undergraduate program in creative writing at the University of Michigan, he is a poet and a writer, and he is simply the best at uncovering hidden gems for us to read and enjoy.

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Arts & Culture
1:08 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Photos from the Electric Forest Festival in Rothbury, Michigan

Julia Field

Michigan is home to a number of nationally renowned music festivals but one of the largest, and perhaps the most colorful, is the Electric Forest Festival.

This past weekend, thousands of music lovers from across the country converged at the Double JJ Resort in Rothbury, Michigan to see over a hundred bands and artists.

While most of the music was electronic dance music, a diversity of music genres were represented in the lineup. There were jam bands, rappers, world musicians, DJs, and even two marching bands.

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