Arts & Culture

Culture
12:18 pm
Fri September 21, 2012

Muslims in Detroit will "Rally Against Hate" this afternoon

The Islamic Center of America will hold a "Rally against Hate" even this afternoon at 3 p.m.
Islamic Center of America

One of the largest mosques in the United States plans a rally at 3 p.m. this afternoon against hateful speech and violent acts.

The "Rally Against Hate" is in response to the violence in the Middle East stemming from the low-budget, privately made anti-Islam video, Innocence of Muslims, the film mocks the prophet Muhammad. The AP reports the video "resulted in at least 30 deaths in seven countries, including the U.S. ambassador to Libya."

The Islamic Center of America is inviting people of all faiths. Organizers say they hope to call attention to those who provoke violence in their speech.

More from WDIV:

"The level of freedom to express one's views in any country is judged by how all expression is protected, including abhorrent speech that is considered hateful. However, those who produce and promote expression that is hateful and which has no redeeming value, other than to promote division and encourage bigotry, should be put on notice that good people of faith will not stand idly by and allow hate to triumph over truth, love and respect," organizers said.

Detroit Film Festival
8:08 pm
Thu September 20, 2012

Stateside: Film festival shines spotlight on Detroit

MODCaR Facebook

People are making a lot of movies about Detroit these days. More than 60 of those films will be screened this weekend at an outdoor film festival in Detroit's Perrien Park.

Organizers hope to spark conversation about how Detroit is seen by Michiganders, and the rest of the world. 

25 hours, 15 minutes and 45 seconds of film, documentaries and music videos - all about Detroit.

“It’s kind of wild how many [films] have been made in the last 3 or 4 years...I wasn’t aware it was on this scale,” said filmmaker Nicole Macdonald.

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Arts & Culture
5:42 pm
Thu September 20, 2012

Stateside: Rick DeVos talks about ArtPrize

Over $500,000 in prize money is at stake in this year's ArtPrize in Grand Rapids.
Steven Depolo Flickr

ArtPrize 2012 has opened in Grand Rapids.

It's the fourth time round for the huge art exhibition and contest. This year, more than 1,500 artists are competing for $560,000 in prize money. And it's all there--from art that inspires to art that could outrage--and it does get folks talking.

Cyndy spoke with ArtPrize founder Rick DeVos.

She wanted to know how ArtPrize differs from shows like the Ann Arbor Art Fairs?

The main difference, he said, was that it’s not specifically a marketplace.

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Arts & Culture
1:37 pm
Thu September 20, 2012

Stateside: Pianos 'Round Town in Ypsilanti

A young pianist plays on Cross St., Ypsilanti. 2010.
Becky Trombley Domegan Facebook

"Basically, it's just free and fun."

That's the motto of Pianos 'Round Town, an event beginning today through Oct. 9th in Ypsilanti.  Pianos are set outside in the open for the public to enjoy. Anyone at anytime can sit down and play.

Korin Hancherlian-Amos, the founder of Pianos 'Round Town, got the idea from British artist Luke Jerram. Jerram began the project, Play Me I'm Yours, in 2008 in London, which has since grown to cities all around the world. 

In 2010, Hancherlian-Amos called her long-time friend, Tim Hoy, owner of Steinway Piano Gallery in Detroit. Hoy agreed to lend the pianos for the event, making Pianos 'Round Town possible. 

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Arts & Culture
5:44 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

ArtPrize 2012 now underway

A giant dragon dominating the corner of Monroe and Pearl is already proving to be a popular piece to take pictures in front of.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Thousands of people walked around downtown Grand Rapids for the kickoff of ArtPrize 2012 Wednesday.

1,517 artists are competing for more than half-a-million dollars in the art competition.

There’s so much art here I don’t even have to leave my office building to find some. Neither did Amy Norkus. I ran into the CPA in the lobby of our building taking a picture of a 20 foot long, very detailed quilt.

"I love it. For me to be able to work downtown and walk around and see art, it’s a real treat. It gets me away from all the numbers I have to deal with all day long,” Norkus said.

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Arts & Culture
4:57 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

This week in Art Pod: grandmas, Grand Rapids and graffiti, oh my!

Grand Rapids teacher Jackie Ladwein and her Liberian friend of 50 years, Joseph Kpukuyou
Kate Wells

Whether it's your show tunes-belting grandma, your Grand Rapids teacher getting Liberian schools named in her honor, or busted graffiti artists using their talents for good, this week Art Pod is a leeetle obsessed with the stories YOU tell us. So check it out, and keep those stories coming. 

Arts & Culture
7:33 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Art Prize begins Wednesday with $560,000 in total prizes

Perhaps the most popular event in West Michigan begins Wednesday.  The art competition known as Art Prize runs through October 7th in Grand Rapids.

Now in its third year it’s an even larger event with more prize money for the winners. Brian Burch  is Public Relations Director for Art Prize. He says the visitor just keep showing up.

"This year we'll have about 350, 000 visitors, but that's right from the start. Our first event in 2009 had about 200,000 people. so we just continue to grow," he said.

There are public awards and juried awards that total $560,000.

Internet
5:16 pm
Tue September 18, 2012

Why are you so mean online?

Social scientists believe anonymity may be the cause of what they call the "online disinhibition effect."
X2N flickr

People are mean on the internet.

This should come as no surprise to anyone familiar with chat rooms or the comments sections of blogs. But why do people say things online that they would never say out loud?

A recent article in the Detroit Free Press asked a few experts what they thought.

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Arts & Culture
7:20 am
Mon September 17, 2012

Healing with music therapy

User: esc861 flickr

As part of Michigan Radio's Seeking Change series, Morning Edition host Christina Shockley talks with someone who has a vision of how to make things better and is working toward that goal.

This week Shockley spoke with Theresa Merrill. She's the director of Music Therapy at Eastern Michigan University. Merrill talks about how music therapy changed her life and how she uses music to help others. 

Arts & Culture
1:44 pm
Sun September 16, 2012

Growing Michigan’s independent music scene

An organization in Ann Arbor is providing independent musicians with tools and experience to help develop their careers as musicians.  The event is called “Fresh Water Musicon” and it happens Saturday, September 22.

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Arts & Culture
9:30 am
Sun September 16, 2012

The battle between anxious and eager

This week “anxious” and “eager” go head-to-head, plus the overstated use of the word “literally.”

Michigan Radio's Rina Miller talks with Anne Curzan, a professor of English at the University of Michigan, who specializes in linguistics.

“There are people who think that anxious should always mean worried, should be linked with the noun anxiety, and not mean that you’re looking forward to something,” said Curzan.

“You can say, I’m anxious about the test, but you shouldn’t say I’m anxious to read that book,” she said.

Curzan says “anxious” has been used to mean “eager” since about the 18th century.

Listen above to hear two other words that are often interchangeable, "disinterested” and “uninterested. Plus, the interesting use of “literally.”

Arts & Culture
1:29 pm
Sat September 15, 2012

ArtPrize is taking shape in Grand Rapids

Venue signs stacked up inside "The Hub" which is the staging area and control center for Art Prize 2012
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Hundreds of works of art are being installed across Grand Rapids this weekend.

The fourth annual ArtPrize exhibition officially gets underway on Wednesday.

ArtPrize public relations director Brian Burch admits there is some “anxiety” as the clock ticks down.

“With an event that is the size that it is…we’re expecting 350 thousand people…we have more than 1500 artists….at 161 venues,” says Burch,  “Every year anxiety is high.”

The artists are competing for more than a half million dollars in prize money.

Arts & Culture
2:13 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

50 years of friendship across continents, poverty, and war

Jackie Ladwein, age 25, on her Peace Corps assignment to Liberia
Photo courtesy of Jackie Ladwein

This next story is about an epic friendship between a white, 76-year-old Grand Rapids teacher, and the driven Liberian boy she inspired 50 years ago when she was a young Peace Corps volunteer.

Their bond has survived hunger, poverty, and a brutal civil war. And it’s created ripples across Liberia, leading to the country’s first school for social workers . Now, it’s reuniting both friends back here in Michigan.

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Culture
10:29 am
Fri September 14, 2012

PHOTOS: Muslims in metro Detroit hold vigil in response to attacks in Libya

Muslims hold a vigil in Royal Oak in response to attacks in Libya.
Mercedes Mejia Michigan Radio

Zanah Ghalawanji 22, gave a speech of condolence to the families of those killed in an attack on the U-S Consulate in Libya Tuesday.

Metro Detroit Muslims held a vigil last night in downtown Royal Oak, in memory of those killed in an attack on the U.S. Consulate in Libya Tuesday.

U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens, along with four Americans and many civilians were killed in Benghazi.

Zanah Ghalawanji is a Syrian American.

"The Muslim community absolutely does not support anything that occurred in Libya. Violence is against our religion. Our religion is all about peace," said Ghalawanji.

Candles burned as Ghalawanji gave words of condolence to the Stevens family.

"We are deeply thankful for the courage and selfless dedication that so many of the U.S. diplomatic corps have shown in Libya, Syria and throughout the region during this turbulent period," said Ghalawanji.

The violence was sparked by a video that makes fun of Islam, and the Muslim prophet Mohammed.

David Sawulski didn't participate in the vigil. But he had a front-row sit at a nearby cafe.

"I think it is great. They're supporting the American ambassador and the U.S. by standing here and giving support for some body who has killed who was assisting those people. The ambassador was obviously loved by the Libya people," he said.

The controversial video has sparked violence in several countries.

Stateside on the Radio
5:08 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Stateside for Thursday, September 13, 2012

New poverty numbers are out. We'll check in to see what they mean for Michigan.

We'll also look at revitalizing some Lansing neighborhoods with art, and we'll check in with the group Michigan Concerns of Police Survivors or MI-C.OP.S., Diane Philpot reaches out to support the families of fallen officers.

Also today we'll talk to the organizers of the Tour de Troit, talk Asian carp with the Environment Report's Rebecca Williams, and the home of Motown music gets a huge helping hand from Sir Paul McCartney.

There are two ways you can podcast "Stateside with Cynthia Canty"

Arts & Culture
3:52 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Stateside: Michigan nonprofit, MI-C.O.P.S. supports families of fallen officers

The nonprofit, MI-C.O.P.S., supports the families of Michigan's fallen officers.
Steve Carmody Michigan Radio

West Bloomfield Township this week lost a police officer in the line of duty—a tragic "first" for the community.

39-year-old Officer Patrick O'Rourke was responding to a "shots fired" call at a home in West Bloomfield. His partner says they thought they were coming to help a family in distress with a possible suicide. Instead, a blast of bullets through a bedroom door killed Officer O'Rourke.

He leaves behind his wife Amy and four small children. His funeral will be held tomorrow morning.

Diane Philpot knows the agony of losing a first responder in the line of duty.

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Arts & Culture
3:18 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Stateside: Cyclists take over streets of Detroit for 11th Annual Tour de Troit

Cyclists will descend on Detroit for the 11th Annual Tour de Troit on Saturday.
Brian Stoeckel

"Cyclists, meet the City of Detroit."

That's basically the goal of Tour de Troit, an event happening this Saturday. That's when thousands of cyclists will take over the streets of Detroit and discover the pleasures of big-city biking during a thirty-mile ride.

Bill Lusa is the director of Tour de Troit.

Cyndy talked to Lusa about what's happening this Saturday?

This year the streets are completely closed to automobile traffic throughout the route, giving participants the opportunity to ride streets freely with other bicyclists Lusa said.

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Music
2:13 pm
Thu September 13, 2012

Stateside: Sir Paul McCartney restores historic, Motown piano

Esther Gordy Edwards started the Motown Museum in 1985. After a recent visit, Sir Paul McCartney "adopted" one of Hitsville's historic pianos and had it restored by Steinway.
user dig downtown detroit Flickr

It's called "Hitsville USA": the little house on West Grand Boulevard in Detroit that Berry Gordy, Jr. bought as a home for the fledgling record company that grew up to become the legendary Motown.

These days, Hitsville is a museum dedicated to sharing the Motown experience with fans that come from around the world.

One such fan was in Detroit on a Sunday in July 2011. And before he performed for 37, 854 fans at Comerica Park, Sir Paul McCartney had one request: to visit Hitsville.

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Arts & Culture
11:15 am
Thu September 13, 2012

Stateside: Lansing neighborhoods bringing life back with art

Emily Fox Michigan Radio

REO Town's past

Ryan Wert is a young entrepreneur who’s been living in REO Town for the past 8 years. REO Town is a neighborhood on Lansing’s south side that used to be home to the R-E-O Motor Company. This was a vibrant working class neighborhood, but now the main street is pretty vacant except for a few new office buildings.

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Comedy
4:39 pm
Wed September 12, 2012

Paula Poundstone brings her stand-up comedy to Dearborn

Paula Poundstone. Screen shot from her website.

Paula Poundstone is one of the funniest people in Public Radio. You can hear her test her knowledge of the news, and throw in a few quips on Wait Wait Don’t Tell Me. This Friday, she’ll be performing at the Ford Community Performing Arts Center.

About thirteen years ago, when Poundstone started with Wait Wait, the show was produced mostly in-studio.

“The show was still really, really fun to do. But it definitely and obviously took on a stronger energy by virtue of having a responsive crowd in from of us, which is really, really fun,” she said.

Poundstone draws comical inspiration from the crowd during her stand-up as well.

“My favorite part of the night is, I do a time honored, ‘where are you from, what do you do for a living?’ And little biographies emerge, and I kind of use that to set my sails for what to talk about,” she said.

Go here to find out more this Friday's event.

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