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Bill Schuette

Rick Pluta / MPRN

We followed the twists, turns, and drama surrounding Michigan's presidential recount. Green Party candidate Jill Stein requested the recount in Michigan (and in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania) after stories circulated about the need for a robust auditing system of elections in the U.S. (Read more about that here .) We kept this post updated as the parties battled it out in federal and state courts. The Michigan State Supreme Court put the final nail in the coffin for the Michigan recount. Scroll...

Campaign representatives will look at ballots, but they're not allowed to touch them.
flickr user Michael Dorausch / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Today, the Board of State Canvassers deadlocked on President-elect Donald Trump’s request to stop a recount of votes in this state. Two Republicans on the board voted today to prevent the recount, while two Democrats said it should proceed. The state chair of the Republican Party, Ronna Romney McDaniel said the party expected this result. A state spokesman announced the recount will begin Tuesday or Wednesday, barring a court order. Rick Pluta , Michigan Radio’s Capitol Bureau Chief, joined...

U.S. Supreme Court justice denies state's appeal to block sex offender ruling

Nov 15, 2016
flickr user Joe Gratz / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan has rejected Michigan's request to put a hold on a lower court decision about the state's sex offender registry law while the state appeals. Kagan denied on Tuesday Attorney General Bill Schuette's emergency appeal for a stay. A federal appeals court ruled in August that Michigan unconstitutionally puts additional restrictions on sex offenders long after their convictions. "What this means is that unless or until the Supreme Court says otherwise, the...

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette is tight-lipped about whether his office will join a federal anti-trust probe into the proposed merger of DuPont and Midland-Based Dow Chemical. Reuters is reporting that seven state attorneys general, including California’s, have signed on to a federal anti-trust probe into the multi-billion-dollar deal to merge the two giant chemical companies. The plan is for the company to break up into three smaller units, each focusing on one aspect of the...

There are three weeks to go until Election Day and Republicans are in despair, while Democrats are paranoid because no one is quite sure what the Donald Trump Effect will be on the ballot come November 8th. It appears the Trump campaign is in a free fall, the statistical analysis website 538 now rates Trump’s chances of winning Michigan at 7.7 percent.

The Detroit News is one of several newspapers that have traditionally endorsed the Republican nominee, but have decided against it this year.
flickr user Gage Skidmore / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It's time for another political roundup with Ken Sikkema and Susan Demas ​ . This week Attorney General Bill Schuette issued a legal opinion that poorly performing schools in Detroit can be closed at the end of the year, which runs counter to what Governor Snyder’s office has been saying. The Snyder administration concluded that since the schools are part of a newly created district, they have three years before the state could step in and close the worst-performing schools. Just another example of the attorney general and the governor butting heads.

man at microphone with three men behind him
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The Michigan attorney general's office says a member of its team investigating Flint's crisis with lead-tainted water has resigned after being arrested on suspicion of drunken driving.

Tracey r / CREATIVE COMMONS HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

Michigan is one of 21 states seeking to block the Obama administration's efforts to make more white-collar workers eligible for overtime pay. The coalition of states filed suit Tuesday in federal court in Texas asking the court to stop a new U.S. Department of Labor rule from taking effect on December 1. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and other business groups also filed a legal challenge to the rule on the same day. The new regulation would require employers to pay overtime to white-collar...

Democrats in Michigan are breathing a sigh of relief now that the fight over straight-ticket voting in Michigan is over. For now, at least. The U.S. Supreme Court torpedoed Republican efforts on Friday to deep-six a Democratic advantage in the Michigan election process.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

There was a probable cause hearing today for the eight defendants charged by Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette in the Flint water disaster . What does that mean, and how does today's hearing fit into the legal process? Wayne State University law professor Peter Henning joined Stateside to provide some answers.

For starters, what is a probable cause conference?

kids getting on a school bus
woodleywonderworks / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Summer's almost over, and kids all over Michigan are getting ready for the new school year. This Week In Review , Jack Lessenberry and Rebecca Kruth look at the School Reform Office's annual list ranking the state's lowest performing schools . They also talk about the latest in the straight-ticket voting saga and whether third party candidates will affect election outcomes in Michigan.

The Mulholland brothers ran an $18 million Ponzi scheme, the AG says
Flickr user Pictures of Money / http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Twin brothers who ran an $18 million Ponzi scheme in Michigan are going to prison for up to 20 years. James and Thomas Mulholland bought real estate, mostly in college towns, that they'd turn into rental houses. They were doing pretty well, but they hit hard times during the recession. So they started recruiting new investors, promising big returns and hiding their financial problems. But in reality, the state Attorney General says, they were using that new money to pay back other investors....

michigan.gov / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan Republicans and Democrats held their summer nominating conventions over the weekend. Our It's Just Politics team of Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta sat down with us today to break down both conventions.

Spacing Magazine / Creative Commons http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

This Week in Review , Jack Lessenberry and Rebecca Kruth talk about a failed attempt to get recreational pot on the ballot this November, a report that the owners of the Ambassador Bridge might soon throw some legal hurdles down river to block construction of the Gordie Howe Bridge, and the latest chapter in the rivalry between Gov. Rick Snyder and Attorney General Bill Schuette.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The state Department of Health and Human Services is asking the Michigan Court of Appeals to overturn a lower court order blocking it from communicating with local officials in Flint. The protective order was issued by a Genesee County Circuit Court judge as part of the Attorney General’s investigation into possible criminal activity in the Flint Water Crisis. To date, nine current and former state and local government employees have been criminally charged, including several from the state...

michigan.gov / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

There's a new chapter in the very public rivalry between Governor Snyder and State Attorney General Bill Schuette . This time, they're going at it over a circuit judge's order that bars state health workers from having any contact with the Genesee County Health Department and McLaren Hospital of Flint over new cases of Legionnaire's Disease.

Photo of Gov. Rick Snyder
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Genesee County health officials insist a court order restricting communication with state health officials is not preventing them from investigating cases of Legionnaires Disease. The court order is related to the Attorney General’s investigation of the Flint water crisis. The Snyder administration is challenging the order. In a press release from Snyder’s office, the governor’s office claims the court order is obstructing the department from performing its legal duty in protecting people...

There is a saying in politics that three-quarters of what you do in a campaign doesn’t matter -- you just don’t know which three quarters until after the campaign is over. That’s because there are so many variables that can make a difference once the voting starts, so candidates, campaigns, and political parties do all they can to gain every marginal advantage.

A report says as many as 15 people sent complaints to the Attorney General Bill Schuette's office more than a year before an investigation into the water crisis was launched.
Bill Schuette / Facebook.com

The Michigan Information and Research Service (MIRS) reported this week that Flint residents contacted Attorney General Bill Schuette’s office long before he launched an investigation into what became known as the Flint Water Crisis .

Democrats have accused the Republican of ignoring those complaints, and only beginning an investigation after news media coverage became so prominent.

Ken Sikkema and Susan Demas join Stateside for their weekly political roundup to talk about the issue.

Campaign representatives will look at ballots, but they're not allowed to touch them.
flickr user Michael Dorausch / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A federal appeals court has declined to stay a lower court ruling that declared Michigan's ban on straight-ticket voting unconstitutional. Barring a successful emergency appeal by Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette, the decision means straight-ticket voting will remain available to Michigan voters in November's general election. With straight-ticket voting permitted, voters will have the option of supporting a party's entire slate of candidates by filling in a single circle, instead of...

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A judge has agreed to consolidate the criminal cases against eight defendants related to the Flint water crisis. Genesee District Judge Tracy Collier-Nix agreed to consolidate the criminal cases. The cases involve current and former employees with the departments of Environmental Quality and Health and Human Services. The ruling only applies through the preliminary exam phase. A spokeswoman with the Michigan Attorney General’s office calls the move “procedural”. AG office spokeswoman Andrea...

Traffic lights
Thomas Hawk / flickr http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Sit at enough stoplights, and chances are you will eventually have a person walk up to your car and ask for money. Firefighters do it for the Muscular Dystrophy Association. The Knights of Columbus does it. Sometimes they give you little paper flowers or Tootsie Rolls. But Attorney General Bill Schuette says this violates the Motor Vehicle Code. Schuette says unless money is exchanged for goods or services, the person soliciting is committing a civil infraction. Charities such as the Knights...

Courtesy of Bill Schuette

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette is charging six more state employees in connection with the contamination of Flint’s drinking water supply. Michigan Radio's Rick Pluta covered the Attorney General's press conference and joined Stateside to talk about the reaction to the announcement. One of the biggest takeaways is that this investigation is far from over. Pluta says "they are working their way up the ladder ... targeting higher and higher and higher levels [of government officials]...

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s lead tainted drinking water has been a crisis for more than a year. Now it’s also national political issue. Flint Mayor Karen Weaver strode to the podium at the Democratic National Convention last night after delegates watched video tracing the history of the crisis dating back to April of 20-14. Once at the podium, Weaver stated the situation bleakly. “The problems in Flint are not over,” Weaver told the packed sports arena. “The water is still not safe to drink or cook with from the...

Michigan delegates to the Republican National Convention are focused on picking a presidential nominee. But some of them are also thinking about the Michigan governor’s race in 2018. The house band at the House of Blues played oldies Sunday night while Michigan delegates mixed and mingled. The event was one of many during the lead-up to the four-day Republican National Convention in Cleveland. It was hosted by Lt. Gov. Brian Calley. It’s the kind of event that Michigan’s governor would...

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s drinking water crisis took center stage at the Republican National Convention today, if only for a moment. Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette is the only Michigander scheduled to speak from the podium during the convention’s four-day run at the Quicken Loans Arena. He started his two-minute speech by talking about how people in Flint still cannot safely drink their tap water unfiltered. The decision to switch the city’s water source to the Flint River, and then the failure to...

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette
Joe Ross / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0 / cropped

State Attorney General Bill Schuette says he's slated to speak at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland next week. In a message on his Facebook page, Schuette says Cleveland is an exciting opportunity to "build a unified team" and "take back the presidency." “We simply will not turn the keys to the White House over to Hillary Clinton. And Cleveland is where it all starts,” Schutte said. The post doesn't mention presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump. Early in the primary,...

Once upon a time there was a Republican politician who took office at a time when the nation was bitterly divided over social issues. He knew this was not the way things should be. “We are not enemies, but friends,” he pleaded with his people. He told them he was optimistic that America would do better, and that our hearts would be touched by “the better angels of our nature.”

GOP schism deepens after Flint water crisis

Jul 9, 2016
The Detroit News

Credit good ol’ politics for the widening split separating Michigan’s top two Republicans. The legal jeopardy posed by the Flint water crisis—and controversial decisions affecting special interests—are exposing Attorney General Bill Schuette’s unmistakable desire to succeed Rick Snyder as governor come 2018.
Not that the AG will say so. The growing record of disagreements between Schuette and Snyder is producing a special kind of political fallout: It’s positioning the AG for the state’s top office, and sometimes doing it at the expense of the sitting governor.

Left courtesy of michigan.gov/Right courtesty of Michigan Attorney General's office

This week, State Attorney General Bill Schuette announced that if Governor Snyder wants to appeal a court decision regarding teacher pay, he'll have to hire his own attorney. The AG is sitting this one out. Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes joined us today to discuss the ever-widening split between Michigan's two top Republicans.

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