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boil water advisory

Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

On Tuesday, October 24, the Great Lakes Water Authority issued a boil water advisory for parts of Oakland County after a 48-inch water main broke late Monday night.

The boil water advisory ended for all communities on Monday, October 30. 

Michigan Radio followed this story, and updated it as events unfolded and as new information was made available. Scroll down and read up to see how the story unfolded.

"Out of water" sign after Oakland County water main break
Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Thousands of people in Oakland County are still dealing with a mandatory boil water advisory this weekend. It was issued after a broken water transmission main caused system pressure to drop, and then extended after another leak was detected. The CEO of the Great Lakes Water Authority called it an "unprecedented" event in the regional water system's history, but this Week in Review, senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry tells Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth why he wasn't surprised.

GLWA crews install new pipe at site of broken water main on Wednesday.
Great Lakes Water Authority / via Twitter

The mandatory boil water advisory affecting more than 300,000 Oakland County residents won’t be lifted Friday as originally planned.

The Great Lakes Water Authority says it’s made “great progress” repairing the broken water transmission main that caused system pressure drop, prompting the boil water advisory to be issued early Tuesday.

TRACY SAMILTON / Michigan Radio

Twelve communities in Oakland County are still under a boil-water alert as repairs continue on what’s being called an “unprecedented” water main break.

Jim Nash, Oakland County Water Resources Commissioner, joined Stateside today to explain where things stand now.

"Out of water" sign after Oakland County water main break
Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

The Great Lakes Water Authority says more than 300,000 Oakland County residents currently under a boil water advisory should expect it to last for at least another two days. That's the bad news.

Good news is, repairs are underway, hospital clinics and most schools are reopening, and water pressure has been restored to all but some 35,000 Farmington Hills residents (that's as of Wednesday afternoon.)

Workers repair the water main break in Farmington Hills.
Tracy Samilton / Michigan Radio

Near 14 Mile and Drake, a green pool of water covers half the road at the site of the 50-year-old water main that broke Monday night, leaving more than 300,000 people without drinking water.

Area where the boil water advisory was in effect.
City of Detroit

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has lifted the boil water advisory covering parts of Detroit, Hamtramck and Highland Park.

More from a press release from the Detroit Water and Sewerage Department:

The Detroit Water and Sewerage Department received a statement released from GLWA today indicating that the most recent round of testing shows no bacterial contamination in Detroit’s water supply. Two rounds of multiple samples were tested by GLWA indicating the water meets the Safe Drinking Water Act. According to the statement:

John Sellek / Courtesy photo

If you live in Flint, it can be really hard to figure out what you should and should not do with your tap water. The messages from officials, scientists and non-profit groups sometimes conflict with one another and they’ve changed over time.