car insurance

Secretary of State Ruth Johnson yesterday announced a new effort to crack down on car insurance fraud. Specifically, she, with the head of the State Police and Michigan’s Financial Services Director, are going after those who sell or use fake insurance.

Evidently this turns out to be a far bigger problem than anyone imagined. The state chose one day -- in this case, July 31st -- and reviewed all the paper insurance certificates it collected. In Wayne County, where nearly one fifth of all Michigan residents live, more than one-fourth of all insurance certificates were phony.

But before you say, “What else would you expect from Detroit?” consider this: In far-way Chippewa County, in the Upper Peninsula, 60 percent of certificates were fraudulent. Statewide, the figure was 16 percent on that day.

User: Brother O'Mara / Flickr

Detroit bankruptcy mediation begins today

“The mediation portion of Detroit’s bankruptcy starts today. The city and its creditors will try to find common ground outside court. City and state officials will meet with the city’s major unions and retirement systems,” Sarah Cwiek reports.

16% of Michiganders are driving with fraudulent insurance

“Michigan’s Secretary of State says statistics show a large percentage of Michigan motorists are driving around with phony auto insurance policies. A recent one day survey found 16 percent of auto registration renewals used fraudulent paper insurance certificates,” Steve Carmody reports.

Flint and Detroit still get top rankings for violence

Flint and Detroit remain the most violent cities in America. The Detroit News reports on FBI crime statistics released Monday.
 

“Flint saw an overall rise in violent crime. The city reported 2,774 violent crimes in 2012, nearly 400 more than 2011’s total of 2,392, the FBI reported. Detroit saw a small drop in violent crime with 15,011 incidents in 2012, compared to 15,245 in 2011.”

A judge has ruled the organization which sets the mandatory fee for no-fault auto insurance must disclose how it calculates the fee. 

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A Detroit lawmaker thinks he has the answer to that city’s high rate of uninsured drivers.

State Senator Virgil Smith wants to create a pilot program that would allow Detroit drivers to sign up for bare-bones insurance policies with reduced rates. The idea is to cover medical costs up to $50,000 a person, or $100,000 an accident. Right now, the state’s no-fault law requires unlimited personal injury coverage. Smith says that’s hampered efforts to reduce urban insurance rates.