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Concealed Pistol License

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A set of bills passed the Michigan Senate Wednesday that would allow concealed weapons in gun-free zones such as schools, day cares, stadiums, and churches.

Senate Bills 584, 585, and 586 were passed along party lines – Marty Knollenberg was the only Republican to vote against the motion.

Handguns
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In the wake of another mass shooting, the state Legislature took up bills to expand Michigan’s concealed carry laws.

Legislation would let people who get a special license carry a concealed weapon in places where they’re currently banned: places like schools and day cares.

Concealed pistol licenses way up in Mich.

Mar 21, 2017
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The number of concealed pistol licenses approved in Michigan surged 42% last year, compared to the year before. That's according to a recent report from the Michigan State Police.

About 170,000 concealed pistol licenses were issued in Michigan in the year ending September 30, 2016.

That's up from approximately 120,000  issued the previous year, and from about 37,000 issued ten years ago.

According to the State Police, there are slightly more than 600,000 active concealed pistol licenses in Michigan.

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Gun owners in Michigan would be able to carry a concealed weapon without a permit under a package of bills introduced this week in  Lansing.

Rep. Jim Runestad, R-White Lake, sponsor of one of the bills, said the permit requirement and related fees put an undue burden on lawful gun owners who want to conceal carry for self defense. 

"It's really just making sure that we're protecting the rights of law-abiding citizens," said Runestad. "Criminals will never adhere to any laws."

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Starting December 1st, applications for concealed pistol licenses will pass thru a different system in Michigan.

A new state law taking effect eliminates local gun boards and puts the review process entirely in the hands of the Michigan State Police.  The new law is also speeding up the review process, from 60 to 45 days.

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Local education officials say it shouldn’t be up to them to decide whether to allow guns in schools.

Last week, Gov. Rick Snyder told WJIM host Steve Gruber that he could support legislation to allow concealed weapons in schools if it left the decision up to local districts. He says he’d veto bills currently being debated in the state Legislature because they don’t give local schools a choice.

New bill would get rid of open-carry loophole

Sep 10, 2015
Gun in holster on hip
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A new Michigan Senate bill introduced this week would close a loophole that allows open carry of firearms in gun-free zones, including schools and places of worship.

Last spring, a man caused a stir when he openly carried a handgun to a school choir concert in Ann Arbor. 

That would no longer be allowed under the new bill, but there's a catch.

Kate Wells / Michigan Radio

UPDATE: We've added the actual policies that the board is considering below.

Ann Arbor's school board met last night to consider banning guns on campus.

It's been weighing the question since a gun-rights advocate named Joshua Wade wore a gun to a high school concert. In Michigan, it’s legal to openly carry a gun in schools so long as you have a concealed pistol license.  

Handguns
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A number of controversial gun bills moved closer to a final vote in the state House Tuesday.

A House panel approved bills that would get rid of county gun boards. Those are panels made up mostly of local law enforcement officials which approve or reject concealed pistol licenses. Those duties would go to county clerks and the State Police.

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A controversial gun bill – similar to one recently vetoed by Governor Snyder – has been reintroduced in Lansing.

Michigan Public Radio Network’s Jake Neher has been covering the story. The initial vetoed legislation, he said, was brought to public attention on the last day of the 2014 "lame duck" session, when legislators raised some concern about the bill's language.

Neher said the language in question seemed to make it possible for people to get a concealed pistol license even if they had personal protection orders, or PPO’s, levied against them. There were concerns that domestic abusers or stalkers could get the permits.