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This Week in Review , Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about a loss to Trump’s transition team, newspaper cutbacks, a possible state flag makeover.

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This week, we learned the owners of the Detroit News were offering buy-outs to all of the newspaper’s editorial staff. Then, later in the week, we learned the owners of the Detroit Free Press were offering buy-outs to 17 editorial staff. Without enough buy-outs, both papers will lay off staff. This downsizing worries those who fear the eventual death of one of our daily-print newspapers.

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Earlier this week, the Detroit News sent buyout offers to its entire editorial staff . Now it appears Detroit’s other major newspaper is following suit. Like the Detroit News , the Detroit Free Press is trying to meet its budget for the coming year. As Crain's Detroit Business reports , in order to do that the Free Press needs to cut 17 members of its editorial staff, including editors, reporters, photographers and digital staff members. Staffers have 30 days to decide whether to take a...

Yesterday we learned that the Detroit News is inviting every editorial employee, from the most junior reporter to the executive editor, to quit their jobs. If you work there and you decide to voluntarily walk the plank, they’ll give you one week’s pay for every year you were there, up to half a year’s pay. That’s not a very good offer as buyouts go; a year ago, a friend of mine who had been a News columnist for many years was offered a year’s pay to quit.

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Employees at one of Detroit's two major newspapers have a very big decision to make. The Detroit News has offered buy-outs to its entire editorial staff. That includes reporters, photographers, columnists and anyone else who works in the newsroom, regardless of seniority. If there aren't enough buyout volunteers and the paper can't meet its budget for the coming year, layoffs will probably be next. Michigan State University journalism professor Sue Carter says these kind of cutbacks aren't...

Gary Johnson
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Before U.S. lawmakers left town this week, the House approved a funding bill that includes $170 million for Flint. This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and Rebecca Kruth talk about what needs to happen to get the bill passed once lawmakers return after Election Day. They also talk about Donald Trump's fifth visit to Michigan since he was named the Republican presidential nominee, and The Detroit News ' surprising endorsement of Libertarian Gary Johnson for president.

Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson.
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Conservative news outlets that dislike Donald Trump may turn towards the Libertarian party, that’s what the Detroit News did. The Detroit News endorsed Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson, breaking a 143-year tradition of endorsing Republican candidates for president. The endorsement came just one day after Johnson couldn't name a single foreign leader on MSNBC. Here's the video from Johnson's MSNBC interview: Ingrid Jacques, the deputy editorial page editor at the Detroit News,...

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After working more than a month without contracts, unionized Detroit News and Free Press employees have ratified a new, three-year deal. Detroit’s two major newspapers have different owners. But their business operations are run jointly through a joint operating agreement, with Free Press owner Gannett media c ompany holding almost all the purse strings. The new deal between Gannett and the Newspaper Guild of Detroit promise small raises over the course of the contract, includes a $700...

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In the two months since the Michigan Board of Education put together its draft guidelines for how schools can support LGBT youth, the purely-optional policy suggestions have become a statewide battleground. On one side, you’ve got advocates who feel the proposals would give schools a much-needed model for basic human decency towards students, especially transgender youth. And on the other, there are conservative columnists, lawmakers and others who feel the guidelines represent a radical...

Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

Employees at Detroit’s two major newspapers are working without a contract. Detroit News and Free Press staffers held an “informational picket” near the papers’ downtown headquarters Wednesday. The Newspaper Guild of Detroit is trying to negotiate a new contract with Gannett Media Company on behalf of both News and Free Press employees. Free Press reporter and Guild President John Gallagher says workers at both papers took steep pay cuts during the Great Recession, and the newsrooms have lost...

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Research by The Detroit News finds that 20% of Michigan lawmakers don't have a college degree. A conversation about lawmakers' education has emerged after Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker entered the presidential race. He attended college, but didn't graduate. Edward Sidlow is a political science professor at Eastern Michigan University. He says fewer state legislators were college educated in the 1970s and '80s. "It was part-time work with a part-time wage, so non-college educated people fit...

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The list of presidential hopefuls grows each week, and it seems voters here in Michigan and across the country are unimpressed with this crop of candidates. A WDIV/Detroit News survey released yesterday shows Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Jeb Bush, Rand Paul, Marco Rubio and Scott Walker each drew more “unfavorable” than “favorable” ratings.

Detroit skyline.
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Detroit's historic and unprecedented bankruptcy came together last Friday for approval from Judge Steven Rhodes. The Detroit News recently provided in-depth coverage from business columnist Daniel Howes and reporters Chad Livengood and David Shepardson . We talked to Howes about how the case was completed in 15 months, about the key players, and about what must be done to avoid repeating mistakes. You can listen to our conversation with Daniel Howes below:

Almost 30 years ago, I was national editor of the Detroit News , which was then the largest-circulation paper in Michigan. The newspaper was then locked in a competitive struggle with the Detroit Free Press , and each was trying to put the other out of business. They had the novel idea that not only low prices but high quality was the way to win, and they did a lot of excellent journalism. Back then, in the days before the World Wide Web, both newspapers sold well over 600,000 copies every day. On Sundays, their combined circulation was more than a million and a half. You could subscribe to either paper anywhere in the state.

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DETROIT (AP) - Businessman Dan Gilbert's real estate arm says it's bought the home of The Detroit News and the Detroit Free Press. Bedrock Real Estate Services made the announcement Friday about its purchase of the Detroit Media Partnership building. The News says the purchase price wasn't disclosed.

The 400,000-square-foot building was built in 1917 and designed by famed architect Albert Kahn.

Detroit Media Partnership President Joyce Jenereaux says she's "thrilled...

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It has been a little over a month since a closely watched vote at Volkswagen's plant in Chattanooga, Tenn. By a very close margin, hourly workers at the plant said no to having the UAW represent them. But that is not the end of things at the VW plant. The UAW appealed the results of the National Labor Relations Board, because of what the union calls a campaign of intimidation by outsiders, including an apparent promise from Tennessee's senator – a promise that has yet to materialize. Detroit News Washington Bureau Chief David Shepardson joins us today. Listen to the full interview above.

What’s going to happen with the Detroit Institute of Arts? That’s the question on the minds of many Michiganders after the city of Detroit was deemed eligible for Chapter 9 bankruptcy on Tuesday.
Daniel Howes, a business columnist with The Detroit News, talks with us about all things DIA – a recent appraisal of the institute’s collection, emergency manager Kevyn Orr’s interest in the museum, and a possible rescue plan cooked up by a federal judge. Listen to full interview above.

Outside Detroit City Hall
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The following is a summary of a previously recorded interview. To hear the complete segment, click the audio above. Nolan Finley is the Detroit News editorial writer.

His column in Sunday's Detroit News seems to point to action from Lansing for an emergency financial manager in Detroit in the near future. Cindy talked with Finley about cities in Michigan with an emergency financial manager in place and how effective they have been.

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