dnc

A Hillary Clinton supporter at the DNC.
STEVE CARMODY / MICHIGAN RADIO

Michigan Radio’s Steve Carmody has had a busy two weeks. He covered the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia this week, after covering the Republican National Convention in Cleveland last week.

He joined us on Stateside to debrief after the DNC, and provide his take on how the two conventions compared.

“I think each convention had a targeted audience in Michigan and each reached that audience,” he said.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The head of Michigan’s state Democratic Party says his party is largely unified coming out of this week’s Democratic National Convention.

State chairman Brandon Dillon spent a lot of time during the four-day convention trying to calm and cajole Bernie Sanders delegates and supporters in Michigan’s delegation, not always successfully.

Still, Dillon says the news media has overstated the number of Sanders backers who plan to bolt the Democratic Party.

Auchter's Art: That's the mayor of Detroit?

Jul 29, 2016
John Auchter / Auchtoon.com

Artist's POV:

In her later years, my wife's grandmother suffered from dementia. She was the same extraordinarily sweet, wonderful person she had always been, but her short-term memory faded and her filter disappeared. For a time she lived with my wife's family. Their formal dining room became her bedroom — it was easy to keep tabs on her from the adjacent kitchen. 

She would go to her room to watch the TV news, and as my wife did her homework in the kitchen, she could hear Nana talking to the news anchor or reporter as she watched.

"Here's what I know: We have to stop Donald Trump!" former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm told the DNC.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Speaking at last night’s Democratic National Convention, former Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm said Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton understands what the U.S. needs. 

“Our next president knows that our nation is a village. That we are one family. And in a family, no one gets left behind,” says Granholm. 

Granholm cited the Flint water crisis as an example. “When Flint’s water poisons its children, it hurts all of us.  These are our children. We are all Flint!” she told the DNC audience.

Henrietta Ivey works two minimum wage jobs and has a hard times making ends meet.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A Detroit home care worker stood in the spotlight at tonight at the Democratic National Convention.

Henrietta Ivey works two minimum wage jobs. She brought her campaign to raise the minimum wage to the main stage at the DNC.

“For me and all home care workers all across America, and my family, this is personal,” says Ivey, “In Michigan, we are ‘fighting for 15.’  A $15 minimum wage and a union … because no working American family should have to be forced to live in poverty.”

Democrats put raising the minimum wage to $15-an-hour in their party platform.

On the final day of the Democratic National Convention, U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders met with Michigan delegates, where he talked about Flint water and Donald Trump.

The crowd in the overflowing hotel ballroom started chanting his name before Bernie Sanders entered.

Sanders delegates and supporters had front row seats and cheered the former presidential candidate several times, though not when he talked about the need to vote for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

The Vermont Senator touched on a few Michigan issues.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Mayor Mike Duggan talked about Detroit’s recovery (and took a shot at Donald Trump) during last night’s Democratic National Convention.

Mayor Duggan used his time at the podium to tout Detroit’s recovery.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint’s lead tainted drinking water has been a crisis for more than a year.  

Now it’s also national political issue.

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver strode to the podium at the Democratic National Convention last night after delegates watched video tracing the history of the crisis dating back to April of 20-14.

Once at the podium, Weaver stated the situation bleakly.

“The problems in Flint are not over,” Weaver told the packed sports arena. “The water is still not safe to drink or cook with from the tap. Our infrastructure is broken, leaking, and rusting away.”

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The division between supporters of Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders in Michigan’s delegation to the Democratic National Convention is getting noticed.

Minnesota Congressman Keith Ellison half-jokingly asked, “Am I in the middle of something?” when several Michigan delegates started arguing in the middle of his speech to the delegation this morning.

Sanders delegates, complaining about the treatment of their candidate by the DNC, and Clinton delegates, growing tired of hearing complaints from Sanders delegates, have grown increasing at odds. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A top state official does not expect divisions over the Democratic Party’s pick for president will affect the party’s chances of winning control of the state house in November.

This could be a pivotal year for the Michigan legislature and who controls the lower chamber. But this is also a presidential election year, with most of the attention focusing on what’s at the top of the ballot.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Former Governor Jennifer Granholm says tonight’s roll call vote will give Bernie Sanders supporters a chance to heal.

Sanders delegates booed the mention of Hillary Clinton’s name during the first day of the Democratic National Convention.

Granholm says the Sanders supporters are dealing with a type of grief one gets when, after passionately backing a candidate, you must deal with their losing the election.  

“They got to take some time to be able to absorb that and see it turn,” Granholm told reporters.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The head of Michigan’s Democratic Party is asking his delegates to not boo speakers at tonight’s Democratic National Convention.

Monday, it seemed whenever Bernie Sanders supporters were booing DNC speakers, television networks panned over to the Michigan delegation. 

Sanders supporters in the Michigan delegation defaced pro-Hillary Clinton signs and heartily booed the mention of her name.

This morning, as the delegation sat down to breakfast, Michigan State Party Chairman Brandon Dillon asked the delegates to be more respectful tonight. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Detroit’s mayor says he plans to strike a very different tone in his speech to the Democratic National Convention this week than the tone at last week’s Republican National Convention.

Mayor Mike Duggan says he was surprised to be asked to speak to the Philadelphia convention.

Duggan says he was “horrified” by Donald Trump’s GOP presidential acceptance speech last week in Cleveland.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Union members have been a key voting demographic in Michigan for decades.

Historically, they’ve been a reliable voting bloc for Democrats. But in 2016, the Trump campaign hopes to change that. 

Hillary Clinton can pretty much write off Joe Kinder’s vote. He’s a retired Ford UAW worker.   

“As far as Clinton goes, she can’t be trusted," says Kinder. "I wouldn’t vote for her."

Kinder, like other members of organized labor, believes the North American Free Trade Agreement, signed by former President Bill Clinton, was a bad deal for American workers.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Tammie Lewis sat in her seat crying as Bernie Sanders finished his speech to the Democratic National Convention last night. Sanders spoke about what the campaign had achieved. Lewis could only think of what she has lost.

“I’m just upset,” Lewis said as tears streamed down her cheeks, “Nothing’s going to change.  He was my only hope."

Other Bernie Sanders delegates from Michigan sat stone-faced as their candidate extolled the virtues of Hillary Clinton.  

Melissa Arab stood holding a pro-Hillary sign she had altered to read STOP HER.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell says Democratic National Committee chairwoman Debbie Wasserman-Schultz needed to resign her job. 

Revelations that the DNC under Wasserman-Schultz’ leadership tried to undermine Bernie Sanders’ campaign led to her announcement Sunday to step down.

Dingell says Wasserman-Schultz is a friend, but the Florida congresswoman had to go.

Outside the RNC in Cleveland.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

This Week in Review, Rebecca Kruth and Jack Lessenberry wrap up the Republican National Convention and look toward Philadelphia where the Democratic National Convention is set for next week. Kruth and Lessenberry also discuss a federal ruling that blocks Michigan’s ban on straight ticket voting and the loss of one of the state’s most prominent LGBT rights advocates.


steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This weekend, Michigan delegates to the Republican National Convention get to work on the party’s national platform.

This will be Meshawn Maddock’s first convention as a delegate. At the state party convention this spring, she was chosen to be one of two Michiganders on the platform committee. Maddock has spent the past few weeks reviewing past party platforms and getting input from her fellow Michigan Republicans.

Maddock says there are certain issues about which she doesn't want to see the party’s position shift.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This month’s Republican and Democratic National Conventions are big parties. 

But they’re expensive parties for the participants.

Charles Niswander is a Bernie Sanders delegate. He’s looking forward to being in Philadelphia for the DNC. 

But there’s a cost: $3,000 to $4,000 in travel and hotel.

“There is a part of me that feels like they would rather keep poor, working people out and not have their voices heard as much,” says Niswander.  

The Republicans and Democrats have finished their national conventions, but now the party faithful have their state convention to attend.

Both major political parties are hosting state conventions in Michigan this weekend.

Republicans are meeting today and tomorrow in Grand Rapids, while the Democrats will meet in Lansing tomorrow and Sunday.

The conventions will formally nominate candidates for the Michigan Supreme Court, the State Board of Education and the governing boards for the University of Michigan, Michigan State University and Wayne State University.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm spoke at the Democratic National Convention last night. She got the crowd on its feet and social media abuzz. 

The former Governor argued that no one helped Michigan when the auto industry collapsed.

“Almost nobody had the guts to help us. Not the banks. Not the private investors. And not Bain Capital. But, in 2009 the cavalry arrived and our new president, Barack Obama, came in.”

The speech just grew more intense from there.

Michigan Radio's Lester Graham talks with Senator Carl Levin (D-MI) at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.
Michigan Radio

Tonight brings the emotional high point of the Democratic National Convention - the speech from President Barack Obama.

All week long, Michigan Radio's Lester Graham has been in North Carolina. He's been covering the convention and the Michigan delegation.

Governor Snyder talked about Republican hopes of turning Michigan to a red state. But the  Democrats in Charlotte will likely have something to say about that.

Graham tells us the delegates in Charlotte are optimistic, but they know they have some work to do to get people to the polls in November.

DTE Energy CEO Gerard Anderson asked Michigan delegates to the Democratic National Convention to oppose a state constitutional amendment increasing the use of renewable energy. The proposed so-called 25 by 25 amendment would mandate 25 percent of electricity come from renewable sources such as wind, solar, or bio-fuels by the year 2025. It will appear on the ballot in November.

Anderson says he’s not opposed to increasing the use of renewable energy, but it should be done through the legislature, not by amending the constitution.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Delegates here have heard from Dow Chemical Company, DTE, the AFL-CIO, various Democratic Party officials and Bob King. King is the President of the United Auto Workers and in Michigan, that carries weight.

He told them Michigan delegates that the platform approved by the Republicans at their convention calls for restricting labor’s right to bargain.

“The baby step in my mind is that they’d pass a national ‘Right to Work.’ They want to do much more than that. They want to take away the right from workers to bargain on conditions at work, their pensions, their healthcare.”

User: cncphotos / flickr

This week Christina Shockley talked with Jack Lessenberry about the focus of the auto bailout at the Democratic National Convention, the teacher retirement benefit bill that has been heating up in Lansing, and the special primary taking place Wednesday in southeast Michigan.

User:Brother O'Mara / flickr

Teachers challenge retirement bills

"The first day of classes was also the day Governor Rick Snyder approved some big changes to how teachers and other public school employees will save for retirement. The new law will require teachers to pay more for retirement benefits. New employees will no longer get retirement health care coverage, but a savings account to help them buy insurance. Teachers unions are already in court to challenge the law.  A judge in Ingham County struck down part of the law within a few hours of the governor signing it. Judge Rosemary Aquilina said retired teachers deserve more time to choose whether they will pay more for their existing benefits, or choose reduced benefits. The new law gave them a month and a half to make their decision," Rick Pluta reports.

Special primary election today in southeast Michigan

"Five Detroit-area Republican candidates are competing for the chance to serve the final weeks of former U.S. Rep. Thaddeus McCotter's term in Congress. A special GOP primary election is being held Wednesday to pick a candidate to face Belleville Democrat David Curson in the Nov. 6 special general election. The winner of that race will serve only from mid-November until the end of the year. A separate contest on the Nov. 6 ballot will decide who fills the seat for the next two years. Republican ex-teacher Kerry Bentivolio faces Democratic Canton Township Trustee Syed Taj in that race. McCotter resigned this summer during an investigation of irregularities in the nominating petitions that kept the Livonia Republican from seeking re-election. Three former aides are charged with scheming to submit false signatures," according to the AP.

UAW president to address the DNC tonight

"United Auto Workers says union President Bob King is scheduled to address the Democratic National Convention. The Detroit-based union says King will speak this evening during the event in Charlotte, N.C. The UAW says 89 of its members are delegates to the convention," according to the AP.
 

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Leading Michigan Democrats are in Charlotte, North Carolina for the Democratic National Convention.
They all say Michigan will go for Obama on election day.

This is a partisan crowd. So, of course, they're going to say the President will be re-elected. But these Democrats also know that recent polls show Mr. Obama and Republican nominee and native son Mitt Romney are in a dead heat in Michigan.

Former Governor James Blanchard says Democrats must work hard if they want their man back in the White House.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Michigan delegates are at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, North Carolina this week. Michigan Radio’s Lester Graham is covering the event, and gave us his impressions about this year’s convention.

Graham said there’s some concern about whether there is enough enthusiasm to get the vote out for President Obama this year, as opposed to four years ago.

“Michigan Democrats seem to be convinced that if they can get the vote out, they’ll be doing fine, that Michigan will be a blue state again, and that Barack Obama will be re-elected as President,” he said.

Michigan Democrats say they welcome the question of whether President Obama’s record leaves Americans better off than they were four years ago.

Democrats get down to the business of explaining their case to re-elect Barack Obama today. Michigan delegates say Republican Mitt Romney’s plan for economic recovery is no different than President George Bush’s.

U.S. Senator Carl Levin says the contrast is that simple.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Some Michigan delegates at the Democratic National Convention say the Republicans had their chance to bash President Obama. This week they believe they will hear why Barack Obama has earned a second term in the White House.

Smarting a bit after the criticism by Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan at the Republican National Convention, some Democratic delegates are anticipating President Obama’s response. Michigan delegates to the Democratic National Convention had some not so nice things to say about the Republican team that wants to take the White House.

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