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DuPont

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Dow Chemical’s merger with rival DuPont becomes to official today.  

Dow Chemical has been listed on the New York Stock Exchange since 1937.  But with the start of business Friday, its stock ticker symbol will be replaced with the new one: DWDP.

Those four letters will symbolize what is now the largest chemical company in the world, worth an estimated $130 billion.  

It took nearly two years for Dow and DuPont to get the regulatory approvals to merge. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

DuPont and The Dow Chemical Company say they have cleared all regulatory hurdles and will complete their planned merger at the end of the month.

The two companies issued a statement Friday saying the merger will become official after the markets close Aug. 31, and that shares of the new DowDuPont company will trade on the New York Stock Exchange beginning Sept. 1 under the ticker symbol DWDP.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Dow Chemical is celebrating new investment in mid-Michigan today.

The chemical industry giant opened its new global headquarters in Midland and broke ground for a new $100 million research and development center.

The investment comes as Dow prepares to merge with rival DuPont next month.

Dow CEO Andrew Liveris calls Midland his company’s “heart”.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

On Monday, Dow Chemical will officially dedicate a new global headquarters building in Midland.

According to the company’s press release, Dow CEO Andrew Liveris will renew Dow’s commitment to Michigan and the Great Lakes Bay Region as the company celebrates the grand opening of the Global Dow Center in Midland.

picture of Dow chemical company sign
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The Dow-DuPont merger is moving to a conclusion.

Last week, the proposed $130 billion merger cleared its last major regulatory hurdle.

Canadian regulators joined their counterparts in the U.S., China, Brazil, Australia, India and the European Union in giving their blessing.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Environmental Protection Agency and Dow Chemical say a planned meeting in March between EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt and the company's CEO never took place. The meeting was listed on Pruitt's schedule and reported by The Associated Press on Tuesday.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) - The long-delayed $62 billion merger of chemical giants DuPont and Dow has been approved by U.S. antitrust regulators.

  The Justice Department said Thursday it would approve the deal as long as the companies sell off some herbicide and chemical units to preserve competition. Those sales are already in the works.

  The merger was originally announced in December 2015 and was initially expected to close in the first half of 2016. But it was delayed several times while U.S. and foreign regulators reviewed it.

A sign on a Dow Chemical Company building
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The proposed merger of Midland-based Dow Chemical and DuPont has cleared another regulatory hurdle.

Brazilian officials are the latest to give their blessing to the $130 billion merger of the chemical industry giants. The recommendation by Brazilian regulators still must be approved by an administrative tribunal, which is largely a formality.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The proposed merger of Midland-based Dow Chemical and DuPont has cleared another regulatory hurdle.

Chinese regulators are giving the merger ‘conditional’ approval.   The condition is DuPont divest some of its research and development department, along with assets tied to pesticides and herbicides used in rice.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

A national group representing America’s farmers is renewing its call on the Trump administration to block the proposed merger of Midland-based Dow Chemical and DuPont.

Rob Larew is with the National Farmers Union. He says the deal is not a good one for America’s farmers.

“Our nearly 200,000 farmers across the country are not in favor of mega mergers like this which will put farmers at a disadvantage,” says Larew. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

We may learn this week if European regulators are going to give the green light to the proposed merger of Midland-based Dow Chemical and DuPont.

Reuters is citing sources saying the European Commission will give its blessing to the proposed merger early this week.

A European Commission spokesman would only say, “We cannot speculate on the precise date for a decision.”   

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The proposed merger of Midland-based Dow Chemical and DuPont may soon clear a critical hurdle.

European regulators may be close to approving the $130 billion merger. The European Commission has until April to make its final decision.

Dow and DuPont officials have been working hard for months to convince European regulators to approve their merger. Those efforts may have finally paid off.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The proposed merger of DuPont with Midland-based Dow Chemical took another formal step in a pivotal regulatory review today.

Getting the approval of the European Commission to the multi-billion-dollar merger is seen as a key obstacle for Dow and DuPont.

wolfenotes.com

The proposed merger of Midland-based Dow Chemical and DuPont is now part of a lawsuit filed by a town in New Jersey.  

DuPont operated the Chambers Works plant near Carneys Point, New Jersey for more than a hundred years.   Teflon was invented there in 1938. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette is tight-lipped about whether his office will join a federal anti-trust probe into the proposed merger of DuPont and Midland-Based Dow Chemical.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Business leaders in the Saginaw-Midland-Bay City region hope entrepreneurs will fill the employment gap left by layoffs by major local employers.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

During a hearing today, U.S. senators quizzed officials with Midland-based Dow Chemical, DuPont and other major chemical companies about major consolidation in the chemical industry.

Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley calls it a “tsunami” of consolidation.

Dow Chemical
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing this week that could affect the planned merger of Midland-based Dow Chemical and DuPont.

Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley is the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. He called the special hearing into Consolidation and Competition in the U.S. Seed and Agrochemical Industry. Grassley is concerned major consolidation in the agri-chemical industry will mean less competition and hurt American farmers.

Dow sign on wall
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Dow Chemical is cutting 2,500 jobs worldwide, including hundreds in Michigan and the Great Lakes Bay Region.

The layoffs come as the Midland-based company absorbs operations of Dow Corning and prepares for a merger with rival DuPont.

“We are moving quickly and effectively to integrate Dow Corning and deliver the synergies that will drive new levels of value creation for our customers and generate even greater returns for our shareholders,” said Andrew N. Liveris, Dow’s chairman and chief executive officer.

official portrait

A senior U.S. Senator is asking federal anti-trust officials to investigate the planned merger of Dow Chemical and DuPont.

Stockholders for Midland, Michigan-based Dow Chemical and Delaware-based DuPont vote on the merger next month.

The merger would create a company worth $130 billion, though eventually, the plan is to divide it into three different companies, one of which would be based in Michigan.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

People in Midland are waiting to see what effect the announced merger of Dow Chemical and DuPont will have on their city.

Midland is a company town. Everywhere you look you see the Dow diamond logo, from the city’s minor league ballpark  to cultural institutions.

And of course, there’s the sprawling Dow Chemical complex on the city’s south side.

Dow started in Midland over a century ago. But that long history is about to head in a new, uncertain direction. 

TROY, Mich. (AP) - Chemical giant DuPont Co. is opening an innovation center in suburban Detroit that's aimed at speeding the introduction of new products for the automotive industry.

The Wilmington, Del.-based company's facility opened Thursday. It is DuPont's eighth-such center and is located at its Automotive Development Center in Troy. The innovation center connects DuPont's Detroit-area customer base with 9,500 company scientists and engineers worldwide.

DuPont says one aim of the innovation center is to boost collaboration with customers, government, educational institutions and business partners.

The company already had automotive industry-focused innovation centers in India, South Korea and Japan.

Arthur Chapman / Flickr

A few months ago, reports started coming in that an herbicide made by DuPont was hurting and killing trees. The Environmental Protection Agency recently ordered DuPont to stop selling the herbicide Imprelis. DuPont had suspended sales shortly before that. The herbicide was used by lawn care companies to kill weeds on lawns and golf courses starting last fall.

Bert Cregg is an associate professor of horticulture at Michigan State University.

He says Imprelis can cause a range of different injuries to blue spruce, Norway spruce and white pine.

“You might see like in a big white pine, you might see a little bit of top growth doesn’t look quite right, you’ll see the twisting and curling, stunting of the top of the tree, in other cases, yeah we’ve seen the tree killed outright.”

This week, DuPont announced a program to process damage claims from property owners. DuPont declined an interview. But in a statement, the company said property owners with approved claims will receive replacement trees – or cash compensation.

DuPont’s also facing a number of lawsuits, including a class action suit brought by a woman from Allen Park, Michigan.

Shelly T. / Flickr

UPDATE: 4:15 p.m. July 28, 2011

DuPont says its herbicide called Imprelis is responsible for tree injuries primarily on Norway spruce and white pines. They are addressing problems on a case by case basis.

ORIGINAL POST: 3:31 July 25, 2011

Three Michigan companies are suing DuPont for damages to trees on their property. It’s the first of at least four lawsuits against the chemical company. Damages linked to a DuPont-manufactured herbicide called Imprelis have been linked to dead and dying trees across the country. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved the chemical in 2010. Lawn care professionals say they’ve received complaints despite using Imprelis as directed. The EPA and DuPont are investigating claims.

Amy Frankmann is with the Michigan Nursery and Landscape Association. She says not only are trees suffering – so are the reputations of landscapers.

"The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development has gone out and investigated the claims that we’ve heard about and our members have done nothing wrong. So they’ve applied it according to label and our concern is that the industry is getting a black eye when they didn’t do anything wrong," Frankmann said.

Repairs for damages nationwide are projected to be in the millions of dollars.

- Amelia Carpenter - Michigan Radio Newsroom