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Families & Community

Courtesy of Lydia Rae Levinson/Michigan Community Resources

The Next Idea

You can’t rebuild your home or your neighborhood without tools. But tools cost money.

Here’s a solution: a community tool-sharing program. “Shovel Share” is just that, and it’s a finalist in the Knight Cities Challenge.

Should the idea win, Shovel Share would create a network of tool-sharing centers around Detroit.

Stateside 2.16.2017

Feb 16, 2017

On this "Day Without Immigrants," we hear from Michigan farmers who say a week without immigrants would "cripple us." And, now that home birth midwives are regulated in Michigan, we learn what that means for moms.

Screengrab / YouTube

Learning disabilities are often invisible to everyone but the people who have them.

Eventually, though, the secret gets out. When that happens, it can be an incredibly emotional experience.

Stateside 2.9.2017

Feb 9, 2017

Time banks are popping up around the state. Today on Stateside, we learn how they use time as currency to match people who need a service with people willing to provide it. Also on the show today, we talk about a House proposal to cut income taxes in Michigan.

The Car Plunge Contest asks the question: How long will it take for this 1998 Saturn to fall through the ice?
Rotary Club of Iron Mountain-Kingsford

It's the heart of winter, and there you are in the heart of the Upper Peninsula, wanting to raise some money for the community.

If you're the Rotary Club of Iron Mountain-Kingsford, you embrace the winter and come up with a pretty unique fundraiser: the Car Plunge Contest.

Jayna Huotari, secretary of the Iron Mountain-Kingsford Rotary Club, joined Stateside to talk about the third annual contest, including how placing bets on when a 1998 Saturn will fall through the ice became a fun, and successful, fundraiser.

Courtesy of the MI Alliance of TimeBanks

The Next Idea

Match people who need a service with people willing to provide a service. Use time as the currency.

That’s the concept behind a time bank.

“A time bank is a community skill exchange," said Kim Hodge, executive director of the Michigan Alliance of TimeBanks. "It’s a way of saying we all have something to offer – we all have skills and assets and we all have needs, and we could be sharing them with each other. So it’s kind of a pay-it-forward, or circle-of-giving program.”

Thomas Hawk / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It wasn't all that long ago when proud parents might carry a small photo album they would happily whip out to show photos of their kids.

Today, parents have various options for sharing photos of their kids on social media. But what do kids think about all that sharing?

Courtesy of Christopher Phillips

What can we learn from the children around us? Do we really even listen to them?

Christopher Phillips, founder of Socrates Café, has been sharing what he’s heard and learned from our youngest citizens.

Phillips is author of The Philosophers' Club, Socrates Cafe: A Fresh Taste of Philosophy, and most recently The Philosophy of Childing: Unlocking Creativity, Curiosity, and Reason through the Wisdom of Our Youngest.  

Kaye LaFond / Michigan Radio

President Trump's executive order on immigration was signed last Friday.

Here's what it does:

Stateside 1.27.2017

Jan 27, 2017

Fifty years ago today, a Grand Rapids astronaut died in the Apollo 1 disaster. On the show, we hear how that accident changed NASA forever. And, we take a trip to Ferndale, where one of the very first Michigan craft cocktail bars is tucked away on 9 Mile.

Courtesy of the Broad Art Museum

A project facilitated by Chicago-based artist Jan Tichy brought high school English students in Flint together with high school art students in Lansing to depict life in Flint without safe water.

The project culminates in an installation at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University and a book filled with student work called Beyond Streaming. The installation invites visitors to open the nozzles of floor-to-ceiling copper pipes. Sounds and original poems recorded by the students will then stream out of the pipes.

Courtesy of HandUp Detroit

Giving money to the homeless, especially on the street, seems to give rise to a whole range of emotions, from the joy of giving to plain suspicion at handing over money to a stranger. 

There are those who don’t want to give cash because they aren’t sure how it will be used. Others feel compelled to help a person in obvious need. Some cities have even gone so far as to ban panhandling altogether.

Now, an online giving platform called HandUp is taking a new approach. The San Francisco-based website recently launched an effort in Detroit that allows online donors to give money directly to homeless individuals and families in the metro area.

Detroit councilwoman Raquel Castaneda-Lopez speaking at Michigan United press conference about ongoing immigration issues.
Mateus Defaria / Michigan Radio

Donald Trump's recent executive orders have people in some immigrant communities in Detroit worried.

Detroit has a large immigrant population, but President Trump's executive order to crack down on undocumented immigration means some families and communities could be separated.

Trump’s executive orders will increase efforts to deport undocumented immigrants and build a wall on the country’s southern border. He also wants to cut federal funding to so-called "sanctuary cities" for immigrants.

Courtesy of Grand Valley State University

The Next Idea

Michigan's philanthropic organizations are facing a changing climate of giving.

Movement of money within the nation's wealthiest families, low wages for many of today's young people, political polarization and the erosion of government safety nets are just some of the many drivers impacting how people give and how charities organize themselves.

Today's contributor to The Next Idea has been watching many of those trends and others that affect charitable giving.

Stateside 1.25.2017

Jan 25, 2017

We Live Here, a new documentary from State of Opportunity, airs today on Stateside. It investigates how massive schools closures in Detroit have affected students and neighborhoods.

Jennifer Guerra / Michigan Radio

What happens to students and neighborhoods when a school closes?

That question was thrust into the spotlight with word late last week that Michigan's School Reform Office has put 38 low-performing schools on notice they could be shut down. Twenty-five of those schools are in Detroit.

Tomorrow, Michigan Radio’s State of Opportunity team will look at school closures in a new documentary called We Live Here.

Courtesy of Debbie Dunphy

Tomorrow is the inauguration of Donald Trump. There will be a parade, of course, and the Mid America Cowgirls Rodeo Drill Team from Michigan will be marching in it.

The team’s horses and riders made the trip to Washington from Three Oaks, Michigan, located in the southwest corner of the state.

Newly-arrived Syrian refugees in Oakland County
Sarah Cwiek / Michigan Radio

An Arab American foundation has launched a fundraising campaign for new Syrian refugees in Southeast Michigan, raising more than $50,000 for 25 families. 

The Center for American Philanthropy (CAAP) in Dearborn created the Building Blocks for New Americans Fund to provide each family with basic needs like housing, clothing, and transportation. 

The fund is supported by large donors, who match all contributions by smaller community groups. 

Wikimedia Commons

Juvenile first-time offenders whose mothers don't get involved in their legal proceedings are much more likely to commit another crime, according to a new study.

The study from Michigan State University looked at the cases of more than 300 male juvenile first-time offenders aged 13 to 17. Since juvenile offenders often don't have a present father in their lives, researchers chose to focus on offenders with female primary guardians.

The Pincause pin was created in Ann Arbor and is being sold all over the world to support women's rights causes.
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

"Little Pin. Big Goal."

That's the motto of Pincause, the brainchild of two Ann Arbor entrepreneurs.

Katy Lind and Nate Stevens have designed a pin supporting women's rights. It's a good bet those pins will be on a lot of lapels and collars at the upcoming Women's March on Washington the day after Donald Trump's Inauguration.

Stateside 1.2.2017

Jan 2, 2017

In our first show of the new year, we take a look at Gov. Snyder's priorities for the homestretch of his time in office. We also hear from an author who aims to reframe the outsider narratives about Detroit.

Michigan Makers / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The Next Idea

Over the past few years, makerspaces have become more understood – and popular.

Think shiny industrial warehouses with 3-D printers, laser engravers and metal-working tools. And – of course – think groups of people. As our most recent contributors to The Next Idea explained, makerspaces can become crucial focus points for entire communities.

New Years Eve is almost here – in preparation, Cheers! takes us to a tire shop for a tequila recipe. And, we talk with the Superintendent of Holland Public Schools, a district negatively impacted by school choice.

Stage for "The Drop" New Year's Eve celebration at Campus Martius in Detroit.
Bryce Huffman / Michigan Radio

Thousands of people are expected to be in downtown Detroit to watch the "D" drop on New Year's Eve this Saturday.

Jerrid Mooney co-founded The Drop: the Meridian Motor City NYE celebration seven years ago.

He said if the weather forecast holds, this year's event will be one of the warmest since the "D" drop began.

“We've had negative temperatures, snow storms, and it didn't affect the crowd then, it's certainly not going to affect it this weekend,” Mooney said.

We learn about "Kangaroo Care" today – a skin-to-skin bonding technique for mothers and their newborn babies. Then, an author describes his redemption story after 19 years in prison for murder.

In today's State of Opportunity special, we zoom in on neighborhood collaboration in three different communities. We explore the power neighbors have when working together to solve a problem.

Morgan Springer / Interlochen Public Radio

What’s the most important thing to consider when you’re choosing a neighborhood?

Michiganders are getting ready for the holidays

Dec 22, 2016
Lansing Capitol in December 2015.
user ellenm1 / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

We're days away from holidays like Christmas and Hanukkah.

And Michiganders are celebrating.

On Instagram, people are posting all the holiday things. Decorations, presents, baking, you name it.

We thought we'd give you a taste of what's being posted.

 

A photo posted by Liz Marie Blog (@lizmariegalvan) on

Dec 21, 2016 at 6:48pm PST

Have you ever faced holiday blues? Today, we hear how best to fight the phenomenon this season. We also take a look at where mental health care reform is going in the state. Plans don't include for-profit HMOs... for now.

Nom & Malc / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Type the words “holiday depression” into Google search and you will get nearly a million hits.

It's tough enough when you're feeling down, feeling completely out of step with everybody else. But it's even tougher now, during the holidays, with those messages of cheer, those "tidings of comfort and joy."

Dr. Farha Abbasi, a Michigan State University psychiatrist, joined Stateside today to talk about navigating the holiday season if you, or someone you care about, are struggling with depression.

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