WUOMFM

Families & Community

Today on Stateside, an alleged victim of Larry Nassar says MSU president Lou Anna Simon's apology was "heartless and empty." We also discuss what it means to be neighbors again for black and Jewish communities in Detroit. And, we review the good, the bad, and the ugly that came out of Lansing in 2017.

Paul Sableman / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Last year the Jewish News, a Detroit Journalism Cooperative partner, published a piece about Jews being part of Detroit’s white flight.

But rather than fighting or hassling black residents moving into Jewish neighborhoods, Jews just left. Still, some of the Jewish-owned businesses stayed behind, serving the new residents.

Pastor Aramis Hinds of Breakers Covenant Church International and Rabbi Ariana Silverman of the Isaac Agree Downtown Synagogue joined Stateside today to discuss how the relationship between Jews and African Americans evolved during that period of history. They also discussed how it continues to evolve today.

Looking up into the rotunda of the Michigan Capitol.
user cedarbenddrive/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A new veterans’ home may not go in Detroit as originally planned.

State lawmakers OK’d a bill Wednesday that says the new home can go in Wayne, Oakland or Macomb counties. If the state still can’t find a place within 45 days, then it can look in the greater southeast Michigan area. The measure was part of a larger funding bill that included funding to address a chemical that has cropped up in groundwater around the state.

Michigan State University

A medical school dean who supervised a Michigan State University sports doctor convicted of sexually abusing patients is stepping down.

person shaking prescription pills from bottle into hand
flickr user frankileon / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Gov. Rick Snyder has a stack of bills aimed at combating the opioid crisis headed to his desk. Lawmakers in the House and Senate passed bipartisan legislation Wednesday. A major goal is limiting the amount of opioids available to people who don’t need them.

 

Women don't just face sexual assault at work. Today on Stateside, we hear how it happens at home too. And, we talk to a Detroit designer working to bring more black women into architecture and urban planning. (Right now, only .3% of architects are black women.) We also hear why two teachers left Michigan to work in another state.

Christopher / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

The #MeToo movement has launched us into a national discussion about sexual harassment, especially harassment and assault committed by men in the workplace.

Shervin Assari, an assistant professor of psychiatry and public health at the University of Michigan, believes we should also be talking about another aspect of sexual assault that happens at home, behind closed doors: forced sex in intimate relationships.

MSU President Lou Anna Simon
File photo / MSU

State House Speaker Tom Leonard, R-DeWitt, says it’s time for Michigan State University President Lou Anna Simon to step down.

It's part of the growing chorus of criticism of how MSU has handled a sex assault scandal.

Leonard says MSU has not been forthcoming about who knew what and when as far as suspicions that a university sports doctor was sexually abusing athletes.

“Best case scenario, they have shown they are grossly negligent. In worst-case scenario, something is being covered up.” Leonard said.

Today on Stateside, we discuss whether people will revolt when artificial intelligence comes for white-collar jobs. We also get an update on the Hepatitis A outbreak continuing in southeast Michigan, and we learn what to do if you're sexually harassed at work. 

Kevin Rosseel / morguefile

The state Department of Corrections says Michigan taxpayers spend millions of dollars on healthcare for terminally ill and medically fragile inmates. The department wants the Legislature to adopt bills that would allow the Michigan Parole Board to grant medical releases for prisoners who would otherwise not be eligible.

Chris Gautz is with the Michigan Department of Corrections. He says these are felons who are so frail they no longer pose a threat to the public.

Detroit shut water to 1 in 10 homes this year. Yes, that’s progress.

Dec 5, 2017
A customer walks into a Detroit Water Department customer service center
Joel Kurth / Bridge Magazine

So far this year, Detroit has shut water to more homes than exist in all of Muskegon. One in 10 residential customers lost service, at least temporarily, in Detroit.

Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke says this is why he loves President Trump.

British Prime Minister Theresa May, meantime, is leading a chorus of criticism aimed at the president, who pushed right back on Twitter, telling the Prime Minister to take care of her own house.

All of this over the president's re-tweeting of anti-Muslim videos from a group called Britain First, which May calls "a hate group."

Roymundo VII / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCLO

The Next Idea

Homelessness has a different look in a city than it does in rural areas, and somehow it feels easier to overlook.

Dennis Van Kampen, executive director and CEO of the Grand Rapids nonprofit Mel Trotter Ministries, joined Stateside to talk about a pilot program aimed at helping homeless families in rural Cedar Springs, and take on the problem of rural homelessness more broadly.

Practical Cures / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

One of the very top mental health concerns in this country is anxiety. It’s sometimes hard to be clear about what anxiety is and how to recognize it, especially in children, but identifying a mental health issue like anxiety early on can make a huge difference for a child’s future success.

the Solanus Center

70,000 people are expected to pack Ford Field Saturday.

Not for a football game, but for a Mass to celebrate the life of a Catholic priest who is one step away from sainthood.

Fr. Solanus Casey died 60 years ago, but he continues to be an inspiration to many.  During his lifetime, he developed a reputation of a simple man who inspired faith and healed the sick.    

State Sen. Steve Bieda, D-Warren.
bieda.senatedems.com

A teen was recently attacked in Muskegon County. Officials say it’s because he’s gay. Now prosecutors and lawmakers are calling on the legislature to expand the state’s hate crimes law.

A 17-year old boy was stripped of his clothes and assaulted. The evidence was clear to Muskegon County prosecutor D.J. Hilson – The teen was attacked because he was gay. But when he looked at the statute, he couldn’t charge the case as hate crime, which comes with increased penalties.

Hilson says it’s time for the Legislature to protect all citizens.

By rallying hunters, one man has donated more than half a million meals to shelters. He joined Stateside today. Also on the show, we learn why one group is putting books in laundromats and why Detroit's housing demolition program is "partially to blame" for rising lead levels in the city's kids.

Libraries Without Borders-US

The Next Idea

Pretend it’s Saturday. 

You and the kids are running errands, including a several-hour stop at the laundromat. They are bored, you are bored.... What if you could use that washer time for something like education? What if your laundromat had the services of a library? 

Well, over the summer, this started happening in Detroit. 

Courtesy of City Rescue Mission of Lansing

Think about this: providing enough meat to make more than half a million meals for people in need. That's over 100,000 pounds of meat, and much of it is venison.

That's the remarkable result of of Tom Cullimore's work through his effort called HOPE: Help Other People Eat. 

Detroit demo blitz linked to rising lead levels in children

Nov 14, 2017
measuring lead paint levels
Joel Kurth / Bridge Magazine

Lead levels among Detroit children are rising after decades of decline, and health officials say the city’s aggressive housing demolition program is partially to blame.

The city has razed nearly 13,000 homes since Mike Duggan was elected mayor in 2013. 

JANE KRAMER

Mid-Michigan, and particularly the Lansing area, has long been a landing spot for refugees.

To share their stories, a group of artists in Lansing has put together a storytelling exhibit and a book called Refuge Lansing: Stories of Resettlement in Mid-Michigan.

MorningSide: A Detroit Neighborhood

Nov 10, 2017
MorningSide
Mercedes Meija / Michigan Radio

Downtown Detroit is in the midst of a resurgence. However, business districts in the neighborhoods are not seeing the same successes. The decline in population and the decline in wealth in many neighborhoods is keeping much of the city in a prolonged economic downturn.

Today on Stateside, Rep. Upton says the Republican tax plan will make us "more competitive with the rest of the world." We also hear about a program that helps veterans find camaraderie through beekeeping. And, after being released this spring, a former juvenile lifer talks college, forgiveness, and second chances.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement - or ICE - agents
U.S. Air Force / Creative Commons / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The ACLU is trying to force the release of Iraqi detainees being held by federal immigration authorities. The civil liberties group filed a motion today with a federal judge in Detroit.

This is happening as the first round of detainees are getting their government files, which will allow them to start the process of having their cases re-opened.

Miriam Aukerman is an ACLU attorney. She says hundreds of detainees have been locked up for four or five months without a hearing.

Handguns
user Joshuashearn / wikimedia commons

In the wake of another mass shooting, the state Legislature took up bills to expand Michigan’s concealed carry laws.

Legislation would let people who get a special license carry a concealed weapon in places where they’re currently banned: places like schools and day cares.

Courtesy of Kathy Hay

One of the most profound and moving ways to observe Veteran's Day is to hear veterans share their stories.

That’s happening Wednesday, Nov. 8 at Ann Arbor’s Hill Auditorium as part of Stories of Service: An Evening With Veterans. During the event, six veterans will share stories of service ranging from World War II to Afghanistan. It’s a celebration of vets, their families, and their friends.

Kathy Hay will share her story on Wednesday. She served stateside in the Air Force during the Vietnam War era and then became one of the first uniformed female officers in the Ann Arbor Police Department.

Today on Stateside, Google's education evangelist says he's living proof that education disrupts poverty. We also learn watching TV is good for you – in space, that is. Also today, we hear about a prisoner awaiting resentencing while knowing he could get life without parole again.

BURGOS/JIMENEZ FAMILY

(Editor’s note: we recommend you listen to this story.) 

Jose Burgos was 16 years old when he shot and killed Omar Kaji. It happened during a bogus drug deal in 1991 in southwest Detroit. 

“The whole plan was, we’re going to make it look like – from the outside looking in – there’s 10 pounds of marijuana in this bag,” says Jose.

Today on Stateside we learn how a tiny Michigan town became the Magic Capital of the World. And, as Vietnam vets age, a Traverse City author asks Americans to hear their stories of war and coming home. We also talk about the highest wave ever recorded in Lake Superior, and why Michigan's auto insurance rates are so high.

Department of Defense

Kids in Michigan might get a new way to keep their criminal records clean. A bill in the state Legislature would let juveniles who meet certain requirements have their criminal record expunged – if they complete a rigorous school program.

“We want to give these guys and girls a fresh start in life when their initial rollout has been a little bit rocky,” said bill sponsor Representative John Bizon, R-Battle Creek.

Pages