Health

Screen grab of "Lifestyle Changes & IBD: Dr. Peter Higgins explains his research proposal" / UMHealthSystem

 

When dealing with health issues, it's pretty common for us to turn to the internet. There, we hope to find information and answers.

But Eric Polsinelli didn't feel he could trust the internet to answer questions he had about inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Tens of thousands of water filters have been distributed in Flint.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Health officials say filtered Flint tap water is now safe enough for children and pregnant women to drink.

For months, concerns about potential lead exposure from the tap prompted federal, state and local officials to urge kids and pregnant women to only drink bottled water in Flint.

But that recommendation is changing.

Dr. Nicole Lurie is an Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.   She’s leading the federal response to the Flint Water Crisis.

Three months after adopting a plant-based lifestyle, Ramirez had lost 45 lbs and was off all five of his daily medications.
Marc Ramirez

In the late 1980s, Marc Ramirez played football for the University of Michigan.

While he was playing he was able to eat pretty much whatever he wanted and stay healthy. 

Then he graduated, and without all that physical activity, he started gaining weight and developing health problems.

American Dog tick
Jerry Kirkhart / Creative Commons http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Michigan health officials say they've confirmed the first case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever contracted in the state since 2009.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services announced Thursday that the case involved a child in Cass County in the southwestern corner of the state.

Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by bacteria and can be fatal if not treated promptly and correctly, even in previously healthy people.

Symptoms typically include fever, abdominal pain, vomiting and muscle pain. A rash may develop a few days later.

Wikimedia Commons

On the Fourth of July in 1939, Lou Gehrig said farewell to fans at Yankee Stadium because he had contracted a fatal disease. He added, “I might have been given a bad break, but I’ve got an awful lot to live for.”

Gehrig was diagnosed with ALS, more commonly known as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease.”

Regular Stateside contributor Dr. Howard Markel said there are some questions as to whether Gehrig received the proper diagnosis. If it wasn't ALS, then what could have killed the Yankee legend? 

GUEST  

fresh vegetables at a grocery store.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The federal government will soon begin offering 17,000 Flint households monthly packages of healthy foods.

Working with local food banks and feeding organizations, USDA will provide an additional 14-pound nutrient-targeted food package, containing foods rich in calcium, iron, and Vitamin C. The intent is to limit the absorption of lead from Flint’s tainted drinking water.

Kevin Concannon is with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He says the state has been helping since the city’s water emergency was declared earlier this year.

These mannequins are eerie. From the frozen look on their faces to their mouths which are almost always slightly ajar.

Then there’s the stuff they can do. The mannequins can “breathe” with a chest that rises and falls. They can convulse and bleed and vomit and even birth a baby.

The entire point of these high-fidelity mannequins is to make them as realistic as possible, so they can be an effective learning tool for future medical professionals. 

 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - People addicted to opioids in the remote Upper Peninsula city of Escanaba have a rare group of people to turn to for treatment: the police.

  Escanaba Lt. Robert LaMarche, the soon-to-be director of the Escanaba police, says they won't arrest people seeking addiction treatment if drug possession is their only crime.

Labels on nutrition labels will look a lot different over the next two years
U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

The Food and Drug Administration is changing the design of the nutritional labels on the food you buy. To give us an idea of what changes, why the changes, and when we’ll see the changes is Laura Bix, a Packaging professor at Michigan State University

Among the changes, the new design is expected to make calorie and serving sizes more prominent and easier to find. Also, serving sizes are being adjusted to be more realistic to how people typically eat.

David Stanley is the author of "Melanoma: It Started with a Freckle"
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

There are few things scarier than hearing your doctor say, “You have cancer.”

David Stanley heard those words.  

He was diagnosed with melanoma. What did he do? He survived, and wrote a book to share the experience and serve as a warning. 

Ian Hartley
Courtesy of Julie Hartley

"Minding Michigan" is Stateside's ongoing series that examines mental health issues in our state. 

General Mills

A 20-state E. coli outbreak has sickened more than three dozen people, including four from Michigan. Two people in Michigan ended up in the hospital.  

Baking flour is the suspected source of the E. coli.

The Michigan Department of Agriculture's Jennifer Holton says nine varieties of Gold Medal and Signature brand flour are being recalled.

GABRIELA CAMEROTTI / FLIKR

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) - A Washtenaw County man has a real heart - after 555 days without one.

Stan Larkin received a heart transplant on May 9 at University of Michigan hospital and soon plans to return home to Ypsilanti.

Larkin's story is remarkable. Before the transplant, the 25-year-old carried a backpack with an artificial heart that pumped blood. The Ann Arbor News  says he was diagnosed with a disease that causes irregular heartbeats and can lead to sudden death.

A brother, Domonique Larkin, also needed a heart transplant.

Flickr user kattebelletje/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Drinking lead-tainted water is out of the question, as is cooking with it and bathing in it. But what about gardening? Is it safe to water your garden with leaded water through a hose without a filter?

Stateside 5.26.2016

May 26, 2016

 

On Stateside today, we eat crickets and learn why edible insects could become a staple food source in the future. 

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Crickets taste more like Hot Cheetos than chicken

May 26, 2016
Mercedes Mejia

I’m very lucky to be an intern for Stateside. So lucky, in fact, that I was provided lunch when I forgot to pack one this week.

On the menu: dried crickets with a dash of chili powder, garlic, salt, and lime.

surgical instrument tray
wikimedia / creative commons

Last fall, operating room nurses at Ann Arbor's Veterans Administration hospital began noticing little specks of particulate matter in surgical instrument trays.

The specks meant that surgery had to be rescheduled or canceled, if a speck-free replacement tray was unavailable. 

Initially attributed solely to a water main break, months later, some surgeries are still being canceled due to particulate matter on the trays, despite the hospital taking a number of steps.

Eric Young is acting director of the Ann Arbor VA. 

A protester shows her support for Planned Parenthood outside the Supreme Court Building in March
flickr user Lorie Shaull / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Planned Parenthood has been getting some very strong pressure from pro-life supporters, including members of the state Legislature, who want to shut the organization down because it provides abortions.

Or, at the very least, they want to severely restrict Planned Parenthood's funding and operations. 

Curly fries and a burger
flickr user ebruli / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Fast food has dramatically changed our food landscape.

Unlike our parents or grandparents, we don't have to plan too far ahead to figure out what's for dinner tonight.

But the greater variety and convenience of ready-to-eat meals hasn't made finding good food easier for everyone.

a giant tooth greets children. Not as terrifying as it sounds.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

New programs are getting underway in Flint to help protect the teeth of thousands of children.

Since Flint’s drinking water crisis began, parents have stopped letting their children drink from the kitchen faucet.  

But while that is protecting the kids from contaminants in the water, it’s also cutting them off from fluoride added to the water to protect their teeth.

“We do know that kids who don’t have access to fluoridated water are much more likely to develop cavities,” says Terri Battaglieri, director of the Delta Dental Foundation.  

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Cancer patients and survivors are lobbying lawmakers to make Michigan the latest state to require equal insurance coverage of chemotherapy regardless of whether the drugs are given by needle or taken orally.

The bill addresses the tendency for chemo pills to cost patients much more out of pocket than IV chemo.

Flickr user Alex Proimos/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0
a hospital room
Pallnn Ooi / Flickr Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Michigan population without health insurance has dropped substantially since start of the Affordable Care Act, according to a report this week by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

The percentage of uninsured Michiganders fell to 7% in 2015, down from more than 10% uninsured the previous year. 

Michigan did even better than the U.S. as a whole, with the national uninsured population falling to a historic low of 9.1% in 2015.

flickr user Stephan Ridgway / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Let’s start with an undeniable fact: Someday, every single one of us is going to die.

Death is one thing that we all have in common, but most of us tend to have a really hard time talking about it.

According to Gail Rubin, less than a third of Americans plan for death and make their end-of-life wishes known.

ObesityinAmerica.org / The Endocrine Society and The Hormone Health Network

A nearly 20-year study of African-American teenage girls in Flint has drawn a connection between the fear of violence and obesity.

Dr. Shervin Assari is a research investigator with the Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health in the U-M School of Public Health.

He says a study involving hundreds of Flint teen girls shows a correlation between fear of violence in the teen years and obesity in their 20’s and 30’s.

"Chronic anxiety due to fear from living in a high crime neighborhood is taking its toll on Flint residents,” says Dr. Assari.

Many households store drugs that should be disposed.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A new poll finds many parents fail to keep track of their children’s pain medicines.

The C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health surveyed more than a thousand parents about what they do with their child’s old pain medicines.  Most said they keep it at home.

Fifteen percent of parents polled said they either don’t know where the meds are or gave them to other family members.

That worries Sarah Clark, co-director of the poll. She says opioids like oxycodone or hydrocodone should not stay in the home when they are no longer needed.

Surgery in a Cuban hospital
Michigan State University

Health care is considered a human right in Cuba, and it's free. The country spends far less than the U.S. on health care, yet Cubans have the same life expectancy as Americans.
 
But after students from Michigan State University's medical school were embedded in Cuban clinics and hospitals, they discovered the situation there is ... complicated. 

Let's look at the good aspects of Cuba's system first.

In Cuba, the focus is on primary care, prevention and early treatment

Possible case of mumps reported at Calvin College

May 10, 2016
A nurse administers a vaccine.
Rhoda Baer / Public Domain

A suspected case of mumps has been reported at Calvin College near Grand Rapids.

As of Tuesday morning, the school was still waiting on lab results to confirm the case which was reported late last week.

In the meantime, the school is working with the Kent County Health Department to help mitigate potential exposure to the highly contagious illness. 

Mumps is viral disease that is spread through mucus and saliva. It primarily affects the parotid glands on the sides of the face and can lead to painful swelling around the jaw.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Expanded Medicaid coverage starts in Flint today.

The expanded Medicaid coverage was approved in response to the Flint water crisis.

Medicaid will cover Flint residents up to 21 years old and pregnant women. 

Dr. Eden Wells, Michigan’s Chief Medical Executive, says they’ve been “waiting for this day for a long time.”

“This city’s residents have been exposed to lead in their water,” says Wells, “This requires long-term access to good, comprehensive primary and specialty healthcare.”

wolfgangfoto / https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/

Some patients in the intensive care unit spend weeks moving from one crisis to the next in a cascade of critical illness that sometimes has little connection to the original reason they were placed in the unit.

These patients seem to never quite improve enough to get out of the ICU, but also aren't dying. This group comprises 5% of ICU patients, but they consume 33% of ICU resources, and likely a vastly greater proportion of compassion and emotional resources. That's according to a new study led by University of Michigan physician Theodore Iwashyna and published this week in The Lancet.

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