Peeling lead paint.
Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

Starting this summer, Detroit will try a to combat its problem with childhood lead poisoning by heading to what’s usually the source: the homes where children live.

um hospital complex
Paul / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The University of Michigan is reaching out to donors, offering better access to its hospital’s doctors, for an annual fee.

For $2,700 a year, a patient can take advantage of what’s known as a “concierge medicine” service the hospital is calling Victors Care.

An elderly Italian woman with Alzheimer's.
Eugenio Siri / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Every 66 seconds, someone in this country is diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease. It's the sixth leading cause of death in the United Stateside, and as our nation gets older, that incidence will increase.

Three months after adopting a plant-based lifestyle, Ramirez had lost 45 lbs and was off all five of his daily medications.
Marc Ramirez

Today at Detroit's Eastern Market, there will be a celebration of all things vegan. It's called V313.

Organizers promise food from local vegan restaurants, music by local "plant-powered musicians," and educational speakers. 

Marc Ramirez will be moderating the Vegans of Color panel discussion. He's the co-founder of Chickpea and Bean, a nonprofit which hopes to raise awareness and educate people on the benefits of a plant-based lifestyle. He's also a former football player for the University of Michigan.

Courtesy of Jim Mangi

Traditional wedding vows talk about “for better or for worse … in sickness and in health.”

When your wife has Alzheimer's disease, and you’re her caregiver, you learn what those words truly mean.

Credit Adrian Clark / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

Here's something rare in health care policy in 2018: an idea that can help chronically ill patients and save money for both patients and, ultimately, insurers.

And here’s the real shocker: it's an idea with bipartisan support.

FreeImage4Life / Flickr Creative Commons HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

The number of flu cases reported over the last month across Michigan has been going down. But thousands continue to be reported weekly, and it's premature to say flu season is behind us, according to Dr. Eden Wells, the state's chief medical executive.

Wells said influenza is still widespread in Michigan, and that means more than half the state's counties are reporting recent flu outbreaks or increased flu activity. 


18 months, 25 deaths, and 615 hospitalizations later, state officials are beginning to express hope that a large hepatitis A outbreak is on the cusp of a decline.

Jay Fiedler is with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.  He says he can definitely see a plateau -- 10 to 15 new cases a week -- and no signs of another uptick.  

The progression of a cleanup of a room of someone with hoarding disorder.
Hoarding Task Force of Washtenaw County

For a while, the show Hoarders was popular on cable.

A show about people who just can’t stop hoarding things in their homes. Bathrooms, kitchens, living rooms are piled high with paper, dishes, clothes, food. Doors can’t open. Sometimes there are too many animals in the house. People with hoarding disorder put themselves – and sometimes others – in danger.

The TV show resolves the issue with a lot of drama and tears, and the problem, at least what the viewer sees, is all taken care of in one or two episodes.

But life doesn’t work that way, and for a long time, there just wasn’t a lot of help available for people with hoarding disorder.

An employee at three southeast Michigan health care facilities may have unwittingly exposed more than 600 people to tuberculosis.

Those health care facilities are Saint Joseph-Mercy Ann Arbor and Livingston hospitals, and the South Lyon Senior Care and Rehab Center.

It’s believed the infected worker may have exposed patients and staff at all three places between May of last year and January of this year.

Tuberculosis is a potentially serious bacterial disease that usually attacks the lungs.

erocsid / Flickr Creative Commons HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

Last May, Michigan health officials authorized a way for people at risk of opioid overdose to get Naloxone directly from a registered pharmacy without a doctor's prescription.  The authorization also allows family members, friends and other people who may be able to help a person at risk of overdose to obtain Naloxone directly from a registered pharmacy.

Naloxone, also known by the brand name Narcan, is a medication designed to reverse overdoses.

Lindsey Scullen / Michigan Radio

Mass shootings, like the one last week in Florida, can leave some people feeling nervous.

While mass shootings don’t happen every day, car accidents and industrial accidents do. With all that in mind, hospitals around the country are putting on free workshops to teach people how to prevent someone from bleeding to death.

A nurse administers a vaccine.
Rhoda Baer / Flickr - http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The state is looking to pharmacists to help combat elevated cases of hepatitis A in Michigan.

Last week, the Department of Health and Human Services sent a letter to pharmacies across the state. It outlines how the virus is transmitted and lists symptoms associated with the disease. 

The letter also reminds pharmacists that there are preventative services they can provide that are covered under Michigan Medicaid, including prevention counseling and vaccinations.

Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

The state says it’s taking new steps to fix Michigan’s serious lack of inpatient psychiatric care, in hopes of jump-starting a more comprehensive fix.

Michigan largely shut down its inpatient psychiatric facilities in the 1990s. Rather than picking up the slack, community hospitals cut back too.

That means there’s now a serious shortage of beds for people who need care for an acute psychiatric crisis.


New tests show lead is still a concern in the water in Flint schools.

Two-thirds of the more than 700 recent water samples taken at Flint’s 13 school buildings came back with no detectable levels of lead. But about 3% of the samples tested at or above the federal action level of 15 parts per billion. The highest spikes were recorded at Doyle Ryder Elementary.


There is a continuing debate in Michigan, and nationally, about nursing staffing levels in hospitals and whether there's a shortage of nurses.

Here in Michigan, nurse advocates and some lawmakers are pushing for the Safe Patient Care Act.

Stateside 2.8.2018

Feb 8, 2018

Today on Stateside, we hear how the vicious flu season has scientists looking for a better way to produce vaccines. And, we talk to a Suttons Bay man who celebrated face-to-face communication by walking 3,200 miles across the United States.


The winter of our discontent drags on. That discontent has a name: the flu. Our nation is in the middle of an especially bad – and deadly – flu season. And, even as we are told we should get a flu shot, we're hearing that this year's flu vaccine isn't very effective.

Let's talk about why this is, and whether it's time to re-think our approach to preventing the flu.

Dr. Arnold Monto is a professor of epidemiology at the University of Michigan and an internationally-recognized influenza expert. He joined Stateside today.

Listen to the conversation above, or read highlights below.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Some popular gay bars in Detroit, Ferndale and Pontiac will have on-site hepatitis A vaccination clinics this month.

It's the state's latest effort to slow the hep A outbreak in Southeast Michigan.

About 14% of the 727 cases identified so far are men who have sex with men -- hence the clinics.

Many hep A cases are also occurring among drug users, jail inmates, restaurant workers, people with no permanent home, and people who live with an infected person.  590 people have been hospitalized, and 24 people have died from infections from the virus.

MEDDYGARNET / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg


Does Michigan have a shortage of nurses?

That question is at the heart of a push by nurse advocates and some lawmakers for a state law that would set up mandatory nurse-to-patient ratios and prohibit hospitals from ordering nurses to work overtime.

Governor Rick Snyder
Flickr user Michigan Municipal League / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Gov. Rick Snyder wants to improve the state's water infrastructure by investing $110 million annually to help ensure access to safe drinking water.

Snyder's office says Thursday the money would come from a new state fee on water customers. It would be used for priority projects such as water main and lead service line replacement, upgrades for failing infrastructure and collection of information on water infrastructure.

Syringe with drip
ZaldyImg / Flickr CC / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A pharmacist at a Massachusetts facility responsible for the 2012 fungal meningitis outbreak has been sentenced to eight years in prison.

The outbreak killed 76 people, including 19 from Michigan. Hundreds of others were sickened.

Thomas Hawk / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

When President Trump declared the opioid crisis a public health emergency, he offered some ideas for tackling this national emergency. He didn't offer specific plans or funding for implementation, however.

One of those ideas was telemedicine, which might be especially helpful where America's opioid crisis is at its worst: rural areas.

Jamey Lister, an assistant professor of social work at Wayne State University, joined Stateside to discuss the future of telemedicine and its potential to serve rural populations.

Listen to the full conversation above, or read highlights below.

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Recent reports show that the number of organ transplants is rising. While this may be good news to those on an organ waitlist, the reason for the rise — opioid overdose deaths — is troubling.

Dr. Michael Englesbe is a transplant surgeon and an associate professor of transplant surgery at the University of Michigan. He joined Stateside to share his perspective on the opioid crisis.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio/NPR

Michigan State University and Flint officials are kicking off a campaign to get people exposed to the city’s lead-tainted water to sign up for a special registry.

Tens of thousands of people who drank Flint tap water since 2014 have likely been exposed to lead.

The Flint Registry being launched this week is a way to connect people with resources aimed at minimizing the negative health effects of lead, as well as programs promoting wellness.

Detroit Medical Center / Detroit Medical Center

The Detroit Medical Center is still trying to reach a new contract with some unionized workers at its five Detroit hospitals, after service and maintenance workers overwhelmingly rejected a tentative contract agreement earlier this month.

Those workers, who range from janitorial staff to equipment technicians, say the first deal offered by the DMC’s for-profit owner, Tenet Health Care, was simply “inadequate.”

U.S. Air Force

A new website lets people check on their hospital's track record, and compare it with the track record of other hospitals.

VerifyMICare.org includes rates of hospital-acquired infections, deaths, readmission rates, C-sections, post-op pulmonary embolisms, and other indicators of care quality.

Ruthann Sudderth is with the Michigan Health and Hospital Association. She says a pregnant patient might use the website to raise concerns with her doctor, for example.

kate wells / Michigan Radio

Beginning Friday, victims of a former Michigan State University doctor convicted of sexually assaulting young gymnasts can begin accessing help through a fund set up by the university.

MSU has selected Commonwealth Mediation and Conciliation Inc. (CMCI) and the Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault (MNCASA) to help the victims of former MSU physician Larry Nassar to get counseling and mental health services.

GAGE SKIDMORE / FLICKR - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

The recent publication of Michael Wolff's Fire and Fury focused our attention on President Trump's fitness to hold office.

Wolff claims White House aides harbor deep concerns about the president's mental health, although those same aides publicly deny that.

Cigarette packaging with surgeon general warning
Melania Tata / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1xMszCg


The TV series "Mad Men" was set in the 1960s, and its creators went to great pains to make it look as authentic to the era as possible.

That means just about every character smoked. Everywhere. All the time.