WUOMFM

internet privacy

A woman texting on a cell phone.
Public Domain

The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday will hear the appeal of Timothy Carpenter, a man convicted of several armed robberies in Detroit and Northwest Ohio. The case started with the 2010 armed robbery of a RadioShack on Jefferson Avenue in Detroit, and a string of subsequent armed robberies. Because of how police used cell phone data to track suspects, Carpenter's appeal could have major implications for how courts interpret privacy rights in the online era.

Alex / Flickr Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The Michigan House of Representatives is expected to vote next week on a joint resolution intended to bring Michigan's constitutional protections against unreasonable searches and seizures in line with modern technology.

The resolution would amend the state constitution to require law enforcement to obtain a warrant before searching a person's electronic communications or electronic data.

A grid of small cartoons (emoji)
Theus Falcão / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Can emojis – those little expressive cartoons that pop up on cell phones and online – help protect users' internet privacy? 

person using a computer
Christopher Schirner / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A Republican state lawmaker says Michigan should protect people’s internet privacy if the federal government won’t.

State Sen. Rick Jones, R-Grand Ledge, has asked for bills that would restore privacy protections for people in Michigan. That’s after Congress voted to block a rule that would have required internet service providers to get customers’ permission before selling their data.    

“So now, if you go on an internet service provider, or if you go on a search engine, anything you look at can be retained and it can be sold,” Jones said.