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Kettering University

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint is getting millions of dollars from the federal government to help reclaim former auto plant sites.

Buick City and Chevy in the Hole were once major auto production centers in Flint. Now, the two empty industrial sites are slowly being reclaimed.

The $2.5 million grant will help with building a new automotive research center in Flint. Kettering University is developing part of the old Chevy in the Hole site for research into new mobility technology.

house in Flint
Sarah Razak / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

Kettering University wants to help faculty and staff members buy houses in Flint.

The university's Employee Home Purchase and Renovation Assistance program will give eligible employees forgivable $15,000 loans to buy and live in homes near campus.

The program's designated neighborhoods are Mott Park, Glendale Hills, and Carriage Town.

Employees who already own homes in those neighborhoods are eligible for $5,000 forgivable loans to fix up their property.

If borrowers adhere to specific requirements, they don't have to repay the loan.

Gordon Young

It's no secret that the city of Flint is wrestling with huge challenges. A water crisis, high crime rates and a shrinking population.

But, despite its difficulties and dangers, international students are coming to Flint. 

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A former home of Michigan’s auto industry will soon train future automotive engineers.

Kettering University is moving ahead with plans to turn part of Flint’s old Chevy in the Hole site into an automotive research hub.

“This is the next generation,” says Robert McMahan, the president of the Kettering University, “The next phase in (Chevy in the Hole’s) long legacy.”

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A plan to shrink the size of the Carriage Town historic district in Flint is running into opposition from people who live in the neighborhood.

Carriage Town is located just across the Flint River from the city’s downtown core. It’s a mix of neatly restored, large single-family homes and blighted buildings.  

Courtesy: Kettering University

Kettering University in Flint is developing technology that may soon change how doctors learn surgical procedures.

Mehrdad Zadeh is Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering  at Kettering.  He says it’s a process using "haptic feedback."

Patrick Hayes is with Kettering University and explains:

Haptics technology allows a user to ‘touch’ virtual objects by using forces, vibrations or movements of the user in simulations. It has a wide variety of practical uses in various industries, but students in the Research in Engineering and Collaborative Haptics (REACH) Lab have found the technology particularly useful in coming up with practical applications of haptics in the local medical community.

Professor Zadeh says the technology is actually similar to some video games and simulates the feel of working with real flesh.

FLINT, Mich. (AP) - Kettering University is getting a $15.5 million pledge from the C.S. Mott Foundation, the largest such gift in the school's history.

C.S. Mott Foundation's pledge of support announced Monday is aimed at strengthening the school's leadership in higher education and expanding its role as a strategic partner in the Flint area's revitalization efforts.

The C.S. Mott Foundation intends to provide a series of grants to Kettering over three or more years. The first, of $2 million, was made in May.

The grants aim to increase enrollment, nurture the school's economic impact on the Flint area, communicate the university's identity to a broad audience and build alumni relationships.