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Larry Nassar

Dr. Larry Nassar was the medical director for the U.S. Gymnastics team and an associate professor at Michigan State University, where he was the team physician for the women’s gymnastics and crew teams.

Michigan Radio's Kate Wells has been covering the sexual abuse case against former Michigan State University sports doctor Larry Nassar for more than a year.

Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison on January 24, 2018. MSU President Lou Anna Simon resigned the next day. You can scroll through all of our coverage here.

TIMELINE: A long history of abuse by Dr. Larry Nassar

TIMELINE: The Larry Nassar scandal at MSU

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Mugshot of Dr. William Strampel
Michigan Attorney General's office

A former Michigan State University dean is accused of using practice medical exams for his own sexual pleasure.

William Strampel has already been charged with multiple crimes related to sexually assaulting and harassing former MSU students.

Strampel is charged with groping and making suggestive remarks to several women. Prosecutors say he used his position at the university to harass and degrade female students. Now prosecutors want to boost their case through the testimony of two more women.

Michigan State University sign
MSU

There are now more than 300 women and girls who claim former sports doctor Larry Nassar sexually abused them, according to their civil suit attorneys. This week Michigan State University and the victim’s attorneys returned to mediation to try to come up with a settlement.

Michigan Radio
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

The Larry Nassar scandal will shape Michigan’s laws for decades to come.

Nassar is the former Olympics and Michigan State University sports doctor who was convicted of sexually assaulting young girls under the guise of treatment. He’ll likely spend the rest of his life in prison.

The state Legislature has more than 30 bills on its plate aimed at curbing sexual assault in the state and preventing another case like Nassar’s from happening again.

Kate Wells / Michigan Radio NPR

“Spartans deserve better.”

That was the message at a rally at Michigan State University Friday night. About 100 students, community members and sexual assault survivors came out to call for the resignations of the entire Board of Trustees and Interim President John Engler.

The "Sparty" statue on the MSU campus
Betsy Weber / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

A group of Larry Nassar survivors are organizing a rally tonight at Michigan State University to call for the resignations of interim president John Engler and the entire board of trustees.

The rally comes after accusations and apologies about a meeting between Engler and one of Nassar’s victims. 

Michigan State University sign
Michigan State University

Interim Michigan State University president John Engler has appointed two long-time MSU professors, Bonnie Knutson and Michael Kaplowitz, as the school's new faculty athletic representatives. 

Their appointments come as MSU finds itself under fire for its handling of the sexual abuse scandal involving former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar.

Kaylee Lorincz at MSU Board of Trustees Meeting Friday
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio NPR

"Fake news.” That's how a top Michigan State University official described a Nassar survivor's claims that Interim President John Engler offered her a $250 thousand payout in return for dropping her suit against the school.

The Detroit Free Press obtained emails sent by a top Engler aide following Kaylee Lorincz's appearance before the Board of Trustees, where she described the meeting she and her mother had with Engler, his aide, and a university spokesperson.

Looking up into the rotunda of the Michigan Capitol.
user cedarbenddrive/Flickr / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

State lawmakers have a pile of bills aimed at curbing sexual assault. But some in the medical profession are concerned the legislation might go too far.

The bills were drafted after former Michigan State University sports doctor Larry Nassar was convicted of sexually assaulting patients for years.

One bill would change requirements for record keeping for certain types of exams. And make it a felony if doctors don’t document.

YouTube

Scott Westerman announced today he’s resigning as Michigan State University’s associate vice president for alumni relations and executive director of the MSU Alumni Association. While Westerman cited a desire to be near his grandchildren in Florida on his personal blog Tuesday, he’s also involved in an ongoing Title IX investigation, the university confirmed.  

Whenever you think things couldn’t possibly get worse for Michigan State, they do. Just after the team doctor turned sexual predator went off to prison, disaster struck again.

William Strampel, his former boss and the former dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine, was arrested and charged with various things, including criminal sexual misconduct of his own. That case has yet to work its way through the courts, but is going to be anything but helpful to MSU’s attempts to heal itself and stay solvent.

John Engler at the final MSU Board of Trustees meeting of the 2017/18 school year.
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio NPR

What struck Dan Wetzel, a national columnist for Yahoo Sports, most about last Friday’s MSU board meeting was the way Michigan State University Interim President John Engler interrupted Nassar survivor Kaylee Lorincz as she tried to tell a story about him.

“For him to interrupt her, to say, ‘Your time’s up’ – it’s like he has no idea,” Wetzel said. “I don’t think he even knows what the phrase means these days. It tells me he’s not paying attention to anything. He seemed to say it without irony.”

Kaylee Lorincz at MSU Board of Trustees Meeting Friday
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio NPR

Last Friday, an 18-year-old survivor of former MSU sports doctor Larrry Nassar’s sexual abuse stood before the university’s Board of Trustees and Interim President John Engler. She made national headlines.

Kaylee Lorincz accused Engler of privately offering her $250,000 to drop her civil lawsuit against the school, and after she said it wasn’t about the money, she says Engler told her, “Well, give me a number, then.” She says he offered a number to survivor Rachael Denhollander.

Before Lorincz could finish recounting the events before the Board, the interim president told her “Time’s up. Stop.”

Daniel Howes / Detroit News

Now we know why Michigan State’s interim president, John Engler, tapped an ol’ Republican hand to head government relations at the school. He understands politics well enough to know they’ll need the help.

And the politics surrounding the aftershocks of the Larry Nassar sexual-abuse scandal are very simple: someone must pay.

For the assaults on hundreds of women under the guise of sports medicine. For the lawsuits that followed. For the dreadful management inside State’s vaunted athletic department and the office of former president Lou Anna Simon.

Kaylee Lorincz at MSU Board of Trustees Meeting Friday
Kate Wells / Michigan Radio NPR

Updated April 13th at 5:40 pm

Kaylee Lorincz, a survivor of former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse, accused Michigan State University Interim President John Engler of privately offering her a $250,000 check to drop her civil lawsuit against the school.

Lorincz says she told Engler it “wasn’t about the money.”

“Well give me a number then,” Engler replied, according to Lorincz’s allegations.

Flickr User Thetoad / Flickr http://bit.ly/1xMszCg

State lawmakers want to hit universities in their pocketbooks if they don’t follow certain sexual assault policies.

A measure cleared a House committee Thursday as part of the House’s Higher Education committee budget bill. It would cut university funding by 10% if a university doesn’t follow certain Title IX and sexual assault policies.

“I do believe that a lot of the schools are already doing most of these things,” said state Rep. and committee chair Kim LaSata, R-St. Joseph. “But we just want it to be similar across the board.”

A box of Ice Mountain brand water bottles
Steven Depolo / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality has approved a permit for Nestle to increase the volume of water it pumps from its well in Osceola County from 250 gallons per minute to up to 400 gallons per minute.

More than 80,000 people spoke out against Nestle's permit request, but the MDEQ said it cannot base its decision on public opinion.

This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss potential political blow-back that could stem from the state's approval of Nestle's permit.


Belmont Tower at MSU
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

This week, a Michigan House inquiry about the handling of complaints over convicted sex offender and former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar completed its work. The information was turned over to the Attorney General’s office. Some of that information was released in a letter to House speaker Tom Leonard.

Michigan State University sign
Michigan State University

A state House inquiry released Thursday found Michigan State University failed to properly investigate or protect students from Larry Nassar, the former sports doctor recently convicted of sexually assaulting patients under the guise of treatment. A letter detailing the findings of the inquiry says at least 243 survivors have now reported Nassar to MSU Police. 

Larry Nassar
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Before the FBI arrested Larry Nassar for child pornography possession in December 2016, he was googling “Is it illegal to not use gloves with intravaginal manipulations,” “intravaginal manipulations for back pain,”  “vaginal massage,” and “Pubic Hair Removal Demonstration (18+) YouTube,” as police discovered after pulling 57,000 pages of search history from Nassar’s cell phone and laptop.

Michigan State University sign
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

This week, Michigan State University's interim president John Engler announced the school was returning to mediation with victims of Larry Nassar, saying "The university remains committed to reaching a fair settlement with all the survivors."

But at the same time, MSU lawyers were trying again to dismiss the numerous federal lawsuits the university facing.

Belmont Tower at MSU
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Lawyers for Michigan State University and more than 200 girls and women say they will restart talks that could lead to a settlement in civil lawsuits related to sexual abuse by former sports doctor Larry Nassar.

In a court filing Tuesday, both parties say they are scheduling mediation with Layn Phillips, a former federal judge in Oklahoma.

Michigan State University
John M. Quick / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Larry Nassar's former boss Dr. William Strampel has been charged with a felony and three misdemeanors. Strampel denies the charges. Michigan Radio's Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry discuss new developments in the Michigan State University sex abuse case.

Dr. William Strampel
Michigan State University

In a way, the news that the longtime dean of Michigan State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine has been charged with criminal sexual conduct may be even worse than the revelations about Larry Nassar. MSU’s line all along has been that Nassar, the former sports medicine doctor who molested hundreds of women, was an anomaly.

Mugshot of Dr. William Strampel
Michigan Attorney General's office

The fallout from the Larry Nassar scandal at Michigan State University continues. Nassar’s boss and former Dean of MSU's College of Osteopathic Medicine, William Strampel, was arrested late Monday and arraigned Tuesday on felony and misdemeanor charges.

Michigan State University sign
Emma Winowiecki / Michigan Radio

Dr. William Strampel, Larry Nassar's boss and former Michigan State University medical school dean, was arrested and booked into the Ingham County Jail Monday night.

Marisa Kwiatkowski, Larry Nassar
Luke Cooley

Few stories are more horrifying than the revelation of nearly two decades of Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse of gymnasts — girls and women who were supposed to be getting medical treatment.

The story came to life because of investigate reporting by the Indianapolis Star newspaper. Marisa Kwiatkowski, the investigative reporter at the Star who broke the Nassar story, joined Stateside to discuss how she discovered the story through investigating the USA Gymnastics team, how sources were initially hesitant to talk, and the state of news media in 2018.

MSU Belmont Tower
EMMA WINOWIECKI / Michigan Radio

This week, an article in The Atlantic blasted Michigan State University for its handling of nearly every aspect of the Larry Nassar scandal. Nassar is the former MSU physician who sexually abused girls and young women despite complaints that date back to 1997. The article focused on how MSU is “botching its reputation rehab.”

One of the experts interviewed for the article is Jeff Hunt. He is a partner and co-founder of PulsePoint Group and the author of the book, Brand Under Fire: A New Playbook for Crisis Management in the Digital Age.

Olivia Cowan
Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Lawmakers in Lansing have been working on legislation in response to the Larry Nassar case. And while they’re at it, some say they might want to clarify who counts as a victim when it comes to giving impact statements at a defendant’s sentencing.

People who remember, remember Republican John Engler as a blunt, pugnacious governor. And, before that, the same as state Senate majority leader.

Former Governor John Engler
WikiCommons

Michigan State University interim president John Engler accused state lawmakers of interfering with negotiations to settle out of court with victims of former sports doctor Larry Nassar. Engler's comments came in response to a set of bills adopted by the senate this week that give victims more time to file lawsuits. The former governor also said the bills could subject universities to more lawsuits and drive up tuition.

This Week in Review, Weekend Edition host Rebecca Kruth and senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry talk about Engler's reaction to the legislation.


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