locally grown produce

Politics & Culture
5:05 pm
Wed October 23, 2013

Stateside for Wednesday, October 23rd, 2013

A new study found that students enrolled in online charter schools are not performing as well as students in traditional brick and mortar schools. At the same time the number of virtual schools is growing. On today's show, we talked about the big business of online charter schools.

And, how do you talk about being gay and Christian? And how should we be talking about it? We spoke to the founder of the Gay Christian Network to learn more.

And, could eating local save energy and help the planet? We took a closer look at the impact of the local food movement.

Also, Jen Guerra from Michigan Radio’s State of Opportunity project joined us to give a preview of her upcoming documentary, “The Education Gap.”

First on the show, is Detroit really broke?

That’s the question before Federal Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes as Detroit’s bankruptcy eligibility trial began today. His ruling could open the door for the City of Detroit blowing up billions of dollars in debt and liabilities.

As has been the case ever since the bankruptcy filing on July 18th, this is all being closely watched from coast to coast. History is being written in Judge Rhodes' courtroom.

Daniel Howes, Detroit News Business Columnist, and the former Chief of Communications for the City of Detroit, Karen Dumas, joined us today to talk about what this trial means and what we might see.

Stateside
3:54 pm
Wed October 23, 2013

Is eating local good for the environment?

Eat more locally-grown, fresh fruits and vegetables
jamesjyu via flicker

There's much talk in Michigan---and across American---about the local food movement.

For many food activists, eating locally sourced foods isn't just a pleasure, it is a moral obligation. They maintain locally sourced food is better for the entire planet than shipping food thousands of miles across oceans, across continents.

Is eating local always worth it? What works and what doesn't?

Dr. Margot Finn is a lecturer at the University of Michigan. She specializes in food, popular culture, and class, and she joined us today in the studio.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:10 pm
Wed September 4, 2013

Grand Rapids organization shows the benefits of shopping local

Elissa Hillary
localfirst.com

When it's time to buy something, what's your pattern? Do you head to the big chain store thinking you might save a little bit? Or do you try to take your business and your money to a local business?

Elissa Hillary hopes you think "local first."

"When you are supporting a locally owned business, 73% more money stays in the community and recirculates, and that money goes to create jobs to fund our tax base, to support our infrastructure, and schools and roads and things like that," said Hillary.

She heads up Local First. It’s a Grand Rapids-based group with a mission to get us all to keep our local businesses and merchants top of mind when we go shopping.

She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Culture
3:43 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Stateside for Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

The Pentagon is proposing to cut back production of the Bradley Fighting Vehicle. We looked at what that could mean for the Michigan companies that make parts for the Bradley.

And, who wins and who loses when a major freeway is widened through urban neighborhoods?

And we looked at the local food scene in Grand Rapids to see just how food builds a sense of place.

Also, a dead zone has developed in Green Bay. What is causing it and is there anything we can do to fix it?

First on the show, There's been lots to celebrate in terms of sales for the U.S. car makers, bouncing back in a big way from their near-death experiences.

But those strong sales have the auto companies and their suppliers boosting production at a fast rate. And that could be having an unwanted effect---declining customer satisfaction with the vehicles they're turning out.

Claes Fornell, founder of the American Customer Satisfaction Index, joined us today to talk about the latest survey results.

Stateside
2:09 pm
Tue August 27, 2013

Grand Rapids is the site of a culinary revolution

Clagett Farm CSA Week 10 thebittenworld.com

An interview with Lisa Rose Starner about her new book.

Let’s talk food. Delicious, fresh, healthy, local food.

That is the mission of Lisa Rose Starner, to get as many of us as possible to eat local. And there’s plenty of that happening in Grand Rapids, from community gardens to microbreweries to food entrepreneurs and artisans and so much more. Lisa was invited to tell the many stories of the Grand Rapids local food scene and the result is her book “Grand Rapids Food: A Culinary Revolution."

Lisa Rose Starner joined us today from the WGVU studios in Grand Rapids. 

Listen to the full interview above.

Environment & Science
12:33 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Tracking cattle from pasture to plate, a new spin on marketing Michigan beef

Activists are calling for the implementation of rules that allow small and medium-size farmers to compete more fairly with large and corporate farms.
jschumacher Morguefile

Michigan cows are making national headlines. Last week, NPR’s Morning Edition covered a story by Dan Charles on the cattle tracking program in Michigan.

The state of Michigan requires cattle to have electronic ear tags. In fact, it is the only state that requires the tags.

This mattered little to the general public until now. Some farmers are looking at how the tags could help consumers learn more about where meat is from and how it was raised.

Michigan Radio’s Mary Jo Wagner first reported on the tracking system back in 2001. Originally, Michigan started the electronic tracking system in order to monitor cattle for tuberculosis, mad cow disease, and foot-and-mouth disease.

Now, the local food movement and recent exposés on cruelty in the meat industry have given the tags a new use.

Read more
Economy
10:38 am
Fri May 31, 2013

Grand Rapids celebrates a decade of “Local First” with massive street party Saturday

More than 10,000 people are expected at a street party in Grand Rapids Saturday to celebrate all things local.

Locals bands, local food, and of course local beer; brewed special for the party with locally produced honey. It’s the biggest fundraiser of the year for Local First, a non-profit that supports locally owned businesses throughout West Michigan. It's their 10th anniversary.

Executive Director Elissa Hillary says if everyone in Kent County shifted 10% of their purchases to locally owned businesses, it would create 1,600 jobs.

“It’s important for us to just be aware that our daily choices have an impact and that they can have an incredibly positive impact,” Hillary said, “So if we’re making choices to support businesses in our community we’re essentially choosing to support people who live in our community.”

Read more
Business
1:30 pm
Sun May 5, 2013

MSU: More interest in buying locally grown food

(file photo)
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

A new Michigan State University survey finds a growing number of school lunch rooms, hospitals cafeterias and other institutions are interested in filling their pantries with locally grown food.

MSU’s Center for Regional Food Systems has been asking institutions about whether they buy locally grown fruits, vegetables and other food staples since 2004.

Center director Michael Hamm says the number of school cafeterias buying local has tripled in the last decade. But he says there’s only so much more local farmers can produce now.

Read more
Business
2:15 pm
Thu October 4, 2012

Stateside: Michigan State University's Dairy Store

The Big Ten themes for ice cream made from local dairy.

The local food movement is not a new thing for Michigan State University's Dairy Store.

It has been selling local dairy products such as cheese and ice cream since 1913. The milk is bought from Michigan Milk Producers, less than 30 miles away.

It's then taken to MSU where it is processed and distributed. A lot of the ice cream flavors have MSU or Big Ten themes.

Stateside's Emily Fox, visited the store and chatted with customers, workers and manager, John Engstrom.

You can listen to the audio postcard above.

Read more
agriculture
5:55 am
Sat December 3, 2011

Winter farmer’s market kicks off today in Kalamazoo

Jane Doughnut Creative Commons

Carl Rizzuto sells his own sausage and meatballs at the summer farmer’s market in Kalamazoo. He tried coordinating a winter market ten years ago but he says there wasn’t enough interest. Now he says business is so good during the summer market vendors agreed a the Kalamazoo Winter Market would be worth the effort.

Read more
Environment
11:38 am
Tue August 30, 2011

Simple business model connects chefs to locally grown food

At the meet-up, Barbara Jenness shares some new cheese from her Dancing Goat Creamery.
Lindsey Smith Michigan Radio

Michigan farmers grow the most diverse crops of any state besides California. Agriculture is Michigan’s 2nd largest industry and it’s growing. But many Michigan farms aren’t big enough to distribute through grocery stores.

Read more
Economy
4:01 pm
Sun August 7, 2011

National Farmers Market Week

This was taken at the Allendale Farmers Market summer 2008. The Allendale Farmer's market is open for business Tuesdays and Fridays from 11 am - 4 pm. This is only during the summer which is from about the 2nd week of June to the last Friday in October.
user tami.vroma Flickr

This is national farmers market week.   The number of farmers markets in Michigan has grown tremendously during the past decade, from 90 in 2001 to more than 250 today. 

Dru Montri is the director of the Michigan Farmers Market Association.   She says farmers markets have grown to meet consumer demand.