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Medicaid work requirement

michigan state capitol building
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The Michigan Legislature has officially begun its summer vacation. Before they left, legislators considered a number of complicated issues, including Medicaid work requirements and school safety proposals. 

To sort out the latest from the state capitol, Michigan Radio’s Morning Edition host Doug Tribou spoke with Rick Pluta, the Lansing bureau chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network.


Emergency room hospital
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A work requirement for some people on Medicaid in Michigan is on the verge of becoming law. The Senate sent the bill to Governor Rick Snyder’s desk today, and despite earlier reluctance he's now signaling his support for the plan.

michigan.gov

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder says he and a key lawmaker have conceptually agreed on a plan to impose work or training requirements for Medicaid recipients, but some details are still being worked out.

The Republican governor told The Associated Press Thursday there's been a "meeting of the minds" and "we're in a pretty good place."

He confirms previous comments from Sen. Mike Shirkey - the bill sponsor - that a proposed 29-hour work requirement would instead be 20 hours.

huntlh / pixabay

Four patient-care organizations have come out in opposition to a bill that would create work requirements for Medicaid recipients.

In a written statement, the Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, American Lung Association, and Leukemia & Lymphoma Society said three-quarters of Medicaid recipients already work.

“For a variety of reasons a chronically ill person may not be able to meet that work requirement and then they may lose coverage of what, in many cases, is life saving coverage," said Sarah Poole with the American Heart Association. 

http://www.senatormikeshirkey.com/

After scathing criticism of a proposed Medicaid work requirement many saw as racist, the lawmaker behind the plan is backing off.

Under the plan, people who live in Michigan counties with more than 8.5 percent unemployment would've been exempt from the work rule.  Those are rural, mostly white counties.