michigan left

A sign indicating a "Michigan Left".
User diablo234 / SkyScraperCity

As part of our M I Curious project, Nick Ochal asked Michigan Radio this question:

What is the origin of the infamous "Michigan Left" that befuddles so many out-of-staters?

User: formulanone / Flickr

This summer, we launched our new M I Curious project. Reporters at Michigan Radio are trying to find answers to your questions.

A few weeks ago, Michigan Radio's Sarah Cwiek looked into why so many people from the Middle East immigrated to Dearborn, and we're in the midst of answering our latest winner's question about the status of the aged Enbridge oil pipeline that runs through the Straits of Mackinac.

But in the meantime, we wanted to give some love to one of the M I Curious runners up. Nick Ochal wanted to know about the origins of the infamous "Michigan Left" turn, the bane of many Michiganders’ early driving experience along with parallel parking.

For the answer, we turned to Joseph Hummer. He's with the College of Engineering at Wayne State University. 

* Listen to the full story above.

A new round of voting ends this weekend. Let us know what you want to find out about or submit a question of your own for our M I Curious project. 

Tom Hayden, co-author of the Port Huron Statement
user KCET Departures / Flickr

A group of university students wrote the Port Huron Statement fifty years ago at a UAW retreat center, north of Port Huron. They called themselves “Students for a Democratic Society.” One of the main participants was political activist Tom Hayden, who was in his early twenties at the time.

The statement begins with these words: "We are people of this generation, bred in at least modest comfort, housed now in universities, looking uncomfortably to the world we inherit."