Mitt Romney

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney outraised his GOP competitors and President Obama in Michigan during the second quarter of this year, according to the Federal Election Commission.

Romney raised $884,124 in the quarter that ended June 30th, while President Obama raised $393,428. Romney is a Michigan native whose father, George W. Romney, was Michigan’s 43rd Governor.

Republicans trailing behind Romney were Texas Congressman Ron Paul with $46,106; former Governor of Minnesota Tim Pawlenty with $22,450; businessman Hermain Cain with $16,100; Minnesota Congresswoman Michele Bachmann with $10,185; former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich with $9,775; former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum with $1,650; and former Governor of New Mexico Gary Johnson with $1,500.

If you paid attention to the news yesterday, you probably know that a tussle is still going on over redistricting in Lansing. You may have heard that the troubled Detroit school system wants to cut their employees’ pay ten percent and eliminated hundreds of jobs.

We’re pulling troops out of Afghanistan and the federal budget talks are a mess, but I want to fill you in on a story you may have missed. Yesterday, Jon Bumstead endorsed Mitt Romney for president. This actually happened. Bumstead endorsed him.

Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney made a pair of campaign stops in metro Detroit on his first trip to the state as a declared candidate.

The former Massachusetts governor was greeted with protests at a Livonia diner in the morning. Romney then headed to the business incubator Bizdom U in Detroit, where he offered advice to a handful of entrepreneurs.

Matthew Reichibach / Flickr

Mitt Romney's visit to Michigan has sparked a debate over his views on the federal bailouts of the auto industry.

Democrats have been working to make political hay out of statements Romney made prior to, and after the restructuring of GM and Chrysler under Chapter 11 bankruptcy - restructuring that was made possible with loans from the U.S. and Canadian governments.

On his Facebook page, Congressman John Dingell said he "hopes Governor Romney has answers for Michigan's working families he abandoned two years ago when the American auto industry was in its worst crisis ever."

In 2008, Romney wrote an opinion piece in the New York Times titled "Let Detroit Go Bankrupt."

Two and half years later, with Chrysler and GM rising from the ashes, the title of his opinion piece makes it look as though he was wrong.

The Democratic Party put out this video attacking Republicans, including Romney, for their stance on the auto industry bailouts. The title of Romney's opinion piece is heavily featured in the video - (the video includes a soundtrack with dark, foreboding music for the Republicans, and happy music for the Democrats).

Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

Michigan Congressman Thaddeus McCotter offered fellow Republican Mitt Romney a not-so-friendly welcome ahead of a pair of campaign stops Romney has scheduled in metro Detroit tomorrow.

Romney plans a campaign stop at a diner in Livonia diner – right in the heart of Congressman Thaddeus McCotter’s district. That prompted McCotter to call a press conference to criticize Romney’s opposition to the auto bailout, and his one-time support for a healthcare overhaul in Massachusetts that created a system of subsidies and mandates, among other issues:

Matthew Reichibach / Flickr

The Associated Press reports Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney will make campaign stops in Michigan this week:

From the AP:

A campaign spokesman said Tuesday the ex-Massachusetts governor would attend a Grand Rapids fundraiser Tuesday night and another in Detroit on Wednesday.

On Thursday, Romney is to campaign at a Livonia diner and attend a business round table in Detroit. They're his first Michigan stops since formally entering the race last week.

Romney's Michigan campaign staff has been revealed. From the Detroit Free Press:

  • Lori Wortz, senior advisor - once served as Dick Posthumus' chief of staff
  • Rob Macomber, state director - previously served as director of candidate and party assistance for former state Republican Party chairman Saul Anuzis
  • Lauren Rakolta, state campaign finance director - daughter of John Rakolta, head of construction firm Walbridge Aldinger who served as a national chairman for the Romney campaign in 2008
  • Bryce Sandler, state deputy finance director, once served as finance director for former U.S. Rep. Joe Knollenberg

In 2008, Romney won the Republican presidential primary in Michigan. He eventually pulled out of the race after John McCain won the Florida primary.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The responses are in for Mitt Romney's health care speech, and they are pretty mixed. 

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie praised former Massachussetts Governor Romney's honesty without commenting directly on either his policies or his candidacy. 

Politico reports:

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

UPDATE 6:10pm  

The invitation-only crowd at Mitt Romney’s health care speech in Ann Arbor  Thursday generally liked what they heard.    The Republican presidential contender wants to repeal the federal health care law.  

 Romney painstakingly tried to draw a sharp contrast between the plan he put in place as governor of Massachusetts and the similar plan that President Obama helped create on the national level. 

Medical student Johannes Pulst-Korenberg thought Romney made some interesting points, but failed to make his case against the federal health care law. 

 “I wasn’t really convinced with how he characterized ‘Obama-care’ as a government takeover of Medicare….I don’t think it’s a government takeover of health care.”

But others in the audience liked what they heard.     Romney’s call for repealing the federal health care law replacing it with state-plans made sense to them.   Stan Watson is a member of the Washtenaw County Republican Party.  

 “I think it’s something that he had to stand up and address.  Because, as he said, it became a liability.  I think he’s bringing it back to an asset talking about health care.”  

Romney’s critics say he should apologize for creating a health care system in Massachusetts that became a template for the national health care law.

Romney told the audience in Ann Arbor on Thursday,  he will not apologize for a state system he says is working.  

 

ORIGINAL POST:   Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney says the Obama administration distrusts the free enterprise system, and the nation’s new health care law is an example of that distrust.

Romney spoke to an invitation-only audience at the University of Michigan this afternoon.

The former Massachusetts governor outlined his plan to repeal the health care law, and replace it with incentives for states to come up with their own solutions to the problem of people who are uninsured.

"Our plan was a state solution to a state problem," Romney said. "And his is a power grab by the federal government to put in place a 'one-size-fits-all' plan across the nation."

Romney said the Obama administration's health care plan is flawed.

"They fundamentally distrust free enterprise and distrust the idea that states are where the power of government resides," said Romney.

Romney said he will not apologize for the health care plan he put in place in Massachusetts, even though it might help him politically.

Romney’s biggest obstacle to winning the Republican presidential nomination is probably the health care issue.

He championed a health care plan in Massachusetts that served as a basis for the federal health care law.

The Wall Street Journal editorialized today that unless Romney can explain why his plans for health care reform are different from the president's, then he might make a better running mate for Obama in 2012 than the GOP presidential nominee.

(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney will be in Ann Arbor later today to talk about the nation’s health care system.  The Republican presidential contender is expected to outline a path away from the nation’s recently enacted health care reform law.  

Mitt Romney will outline his plan to change the nation’s health care system to an invitation only audience at the University of Michigan's Cardiovascular Center. 

Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Republican Mitt Romney announced yesterday that he has formed an exploratory committee for the 2012 presidential election. Romney has close ties to Michigan as his father, George Romney, was Governor of the state in the 1960's.

Romney lost his first presidential bid in the 2008 GOP primary to Senator John McCain (R-AZ). Since '08, Romney has largely stayed in the national political realm with the release of his book,"No Apology: The Case for American Greatness," and speaking tour.

But, it hasn't just been national politics that Romney has been interested in since his loss in '08. The Detroit News reports that Romney's political action committee took quite an interest in statewide politics in the November 2010 election. From the Detroit News:

Though Romney is mostly known in Michigan through his father's enduring business and political legacy, his Free and Strong America political action committee took a keen interest in state races in 2010, contributing to Republicans Gov. Rick Snyder, Secretary of State Ruth Johnson and Attorney General Bill Schuette.

His committee also poured money into the successful U.S. House campaigns of freshman Republican Reps. Tim Walberg, Bill Huizenga, Justin Amash and Dan Benishek, as well as the tea party-backed bid of Rob Steele, the Ann Arbor cardiologist who lost to Rep. John Dingell, D-Dearborn.

In a recent poll by Public Policy Polling, Romney led other possible GOP presidential contenders among Michigan Republican primary voters. From the PP Poll:

  • 26% Romney
  • 20% Huckabee
  • 15% Gingrich
  • 12% Palin
  • 7% Paul
  • 5% Daniels
  • 3% Pawlenty
  • 3% Walker

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