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3&UP Board Game Lounge
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Put away your smartphone and tablets! 

Talk face-to-face, play some board games, and connect with one another.That's the message from 3 & Up Lounge in Plymouth.

Angela Space is co-founder of the lounge. She says she and her husband got the idea from a board game cafe in Toronto, which is a popular cafe style in many countries around the world but hasn't caught on in the U.S.

"We've morphed the idea of a board game cafe where you sell sandwiches, grilled cheese and coffee, and really turn it more into a lounge where people first and foremost connect with each other, and secondarily playing together, having fun, laughing and learning," says Space.

Space says people were a little skeptical at first when they walked in the door, but the cafe has invented some funny ways of persuading people to put away their phones and tablets.

"We have an anti-wifi zone. We let people boo each other," says Space.

* Listen to the interview with Angela Space above.

Plymouth Preservation Network / Facebook

In the Wayne County city of Plymouth, a group is trying to preserve the last remnant of a factory that was once a deep part of the community - the Daisy Manufacturing Company.

Fans of the film "A Christmas Story" may recall the Red Ryder Daisy Air Rifle.

Yes, that red rifle that Ralphie pined for would have been made at the former Daisy Factory.

Joining us is Wendy Harkins. She is president of the Plymouth Preservation Network.

Just over a month ago, I talked about an interesting controversy in the Plymouth-Canton Community School district, a middle-to-upper-middle area of western Wayne County.

The superintendent suddenly banned a popular novel, Graham Swift’s "Waterland", from the Advanced Placement, or AP English curriculum. "Waterland", first published almost 30 years ago, is a highly acclaimed book which has to do with storytelling and history, and which shows how everything is influenced by what came before.

user mconnors / morgueFile

The Plymouth-Canton school district will not ban Waterland from its Advanced Placement English curriculum.

Graham Swift’s novel is the second book this year the Plymouth-Canton school district put on trial. The district considered banning Toni Morrison’s Beloved last month, but decided against it.

A committee voted anonymously in a closed meeting not to ban the books after hearing from teachers, students and parents during public meetings. (Since their votes are anonymous, we do not know if it was a unanimous vote.)

AP English teacher Brian Read, who has taught Beloved and Waterland for 10 years, says both books deal with the effects of trauma, and contain some mature content of a sexual nature. He says he and his colleague don't choose books because they're sensational, or because there's offensive material in it.

"We choose them because they’re really great works of literature and they really work well in our curriculum, they work well with other pieces that we’re teaching. So I’ll absolutely teach it again and I’m glad that I have that opportunity to teach it again."

Read says both books are worth fighting for, and he’ll continue to defend the books if they come under fire again.

There’s an interesting controversy going on in the  Plymouth-Canton Community Schools, a middle-class school district in Western Wayne County. It has to do with banning books.

And while it hasn’t made headlines, the implications are ominous, and scary. This is a sizable district, with three high schools with more than six thousand students.

A high school teacher with Plymouth-Canton Community Schools accused of threatening co-workers has been arraigned on weapons charges. Fifty-two-year-old Raymond Schepansky was charged Saturday with carrying a concealed weapon, possession of a weapon on school property and felony firearm.

The Detroit News reports that a magistrate dismissed a charge of carrying a weapon with unlawful intent after finding that Schepansky had not specifically threatened anyone. The magistrate entered an innocent plea for Schepansky and ordered him held on $100,000 cash bond.

Police say Schepansky seemed angry and frustrated when he arrived Wednesday at Plymouth High School with a handgun and ammunition in his car. He was ordered to stay away from the school.

Schepansky, who's been suspended, was arrested Thursday when he returned, prompting a one-day shutdown of the school.