WUOMFM

Politics & Government

Stories about politics and government actions

Left courtesy of michigan.gov/Right courtesty of Michigan Attorney General's office

This week, State Attorney General Bill Schuette announced that if Governor Snyder wants to appeal a court decision regarding teacher pay, he'll have to hire his own attorney.

The AG is sitting this one out.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes joined us today to discuss the ever-widening split between Michigan's two top Republicans. 

Michigan roads
User nirbhao / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

While many of us were getting ready for the holiday weekend last Friday afternoon, Governor Snyder announced his veto of a road funding bill that would have given some relief to 45 large cities.

Senate Bill 557 was sponsored by Republican Senator Marty Knollenberg of Troy. It was unanimously approved by the House and Senate, a feat remarkable in and of itself.

It would have repealed a requirement that larger cities pay for part of the state's cost for highway construction projects within their border.

Yet, the governor hauled out his veto power to whack the road bill.

Stateside 7.7.2016

Jul 7, 2016

Today, we hear about new technology that helps create sensory experiences for children with autism. And, a doctor explains why removing the stigma of addiction could improve opioid abuse treatment.

 

To hear individual interviews, click here or see below:

Earth First

A group of Earth First activists held a rowdy protest at the Midland home of State Attorney General Bill Schuette to demand the immediate shutdown of an aging oil pipeline in the Straits of Mackinac. 

A statement by Earth First issued after the protest says until Schuette shuts down Enbridge Line 5, he can expect more protests at his home.

Schuette spokeswoman Andrea Bitely says protesters violently beat on the door and windows while Schuette's wife was home alone, and they defaced the property. 

Nino / Morguefile

The city of Detroit has reached a settlement with a former animal control officer who alleged widespread wrongdoing.

Brittany Roberts filed a whistleblower lawsuit against the city, animal control and police departments in October 2015.

She made a number of claims, ranging from unsanitary conditions at the city’s animal shelter, to deliberate animal cruelty.

Roberts claimed she was retaliated against and eventually fired for raising concerns.

This week, the Detroit City Council officially signed off on a $63,000 settlement in the case.

Stateside 7.6.2016

Jul 6, 2016

Today, we look at the chilly relationship between AG Bill Schuette and Gov. Snyder, and we learn about a fatal disease threatening Michigan's deer.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

It's Just Politics Logo
It's Just Politics with Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta

Attorney General Bill Schuette has announced that if Governor Snyder wants to appeal a court decision over teacher pay, he's on his own.

Many in Michigan are viewing the announcement as a sign that the relationship between the AG and the governor, once icy, has now all but frozen over.

Suzanna Shkreli, the Democratic Party's new candidate for Michigan's 8th Congressional District
Suzanna Shkreli / Facebook

The Democratic challenger in Michigan's 8th Congressional District may not be Melissa Gilbert, of "Little House on the Prairie" fame, but instead a 29-year-old assistant prosecutor from Clarkston. 

Suzanna Shkreli, who received her law degree from Western Michigan University and works in the child protection unit of the Macomb County Prosecutor's office, will take Gilbert's place and become the candidate to challenge Rep. Mike Bishop, a first-term Republican.

Attorney General Bill Schuette
Courtesy of Bill Schuette

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette says it will be up to Governor Rick Snyder to hire his own attorney if the administration pursues an appeal of a court decision. It says the state owes roughly $550 million dollars to teachers for illegally withholding 3% of their paychecks to fund retirement health benefits.

  

Schuette’s spokeswoman, Andrea Bitely, says the attorney general doesn’t think the state can win the case. 

Julie Plawecki
http://housedems.com/

Thirteenth District Democratic Party Chairman Jonathan Kinloch says "there are a lot of moving parts" in naming candidates to fill the vacancy left by the sudden death of State Rep. Julie Plawecki.

Plawecki, who represented the 11th House district, died of a heart attack on July 25 while hiking in Oregon.

Kinloch says Plawecki's daughter has expressed interest in running in the special primary election on August 30. The election was called by Governor Snyder to fill the remainder of Plawecki's term through the end of 2016.

Stateside 7.5.2016

Jul 5, 2016

Today, we look at a proposed community benefits ordinance in Detroit. And, a conversation about whether schools are doing enough to help dyslexic students.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

A proposed Detroit city ordinance is facing a well-organized, but so far anonymous, challenge.

A coalition gathered more than 5,000 signatures in favor a community benefits ordinance.

The ordinance would require large-scale developments that receive public money or use public land to return some benefits to surrounding communities.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This weekend, Michigan delegates to the Republican National Convention get to work on the party’s national platform.

This will be Meshawn Maddock’s first convention as a delegate. At the state party convention this spring, she was chosen to be one of two Michiganders on the platform committee. Maddock has spent the past few weeks reviewing past party platforms and getting input from her fellow Michigan Republicans.

Maddock says there are certain issues about which she doesn't want to see the party’s position shift.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

This month’s Republican and Democratic National Conventions are big parties. 

But they’re expensive parties for the participants.

Charles Niswander is a Bernie Sanders delegate. He’s looking forward to being in Philadelphia for the DNC. 

But there’s a cost: $3,000 to $4,000 in travel and hotel.

“There is a part of me that feels like they would rather keep poor, working people out and not have their voices heard as much,” says Niswander.  

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

After a busy Fourth of July weekend, more than a hundred Michigan State Police troopers will travel to Cleveland to provide security during the upcoming Republican National Convention.

The Michigan troopers will be part of the large police presence in Cleveland during the four-day convention in mid-July.

The troopers leave July 16th for a seven-day deployment to northeast Ohio where they will assist with security and crowd management outside the convention center as well as motorcycle escorts for motorcades.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Detroit school children, Flint residents and residents across Michigan will be affected when the next state budget takes effect in three months.

  Gov. Rick Snyder signed the $54.9 billion spending plan this week. It touches many corners of Michigan life - from spending on public schools and road repairs to increased dental coverage for low-income children and more troopers patrolling highways.

  Per-pupil grants for K-12 schools will increase by between $60 and $120. The gap between wealthier and poorer districts will shrink.

cash money
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

The powerful credit ratings agency Standard and Poor’s has downgraded two sets of bonds issued by Detroit Public Schools.

The agency also expressed doubt about a new arrangement that splits the school district in two.

On Friday, new state laws took effect splitting the Detroit Public Schools into “old” and “new” districts.

The old one exists solely to pay off debt with tax revenues, while the new one receives state aid payments to educate students.

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

The state has fully relinquished oversight of Benton Harbor, six years after the city was placed under emergency management to address a budget deficit.

Friday's decision followed a recommendation from a state-appointed receivership transition advisory board.

The southwestern Michigan city will manage operations and finances without oversight. City council ordinances no longer need approval of the board that was appointed in 2014 once emergency management ended.

Both Gov. Rick Snyder and former Gov. Jennifer Granholm appointed emergency managers in Benton Harbor.

Jacobs said Legislature was "penny wise and pound foolish" in neglecting to add $3 million to the "heat and eat" program in the new state budget.
Flickr user Liz West / Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

An advocacy group for low-income people has been going over the new state budget. The Michigan League for Public Policy (MLPP) found some good things in the budget, and a whole lot of federal money left on the table.

Gilda Jacobs, president and CEO of the MLPP, started with the good things:

It's Just Politics Logo
It's Just Politics with Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta

With the sparkling waters of Lake Michigan to set the scene, Governor Snyder on Wednesday signed the new $38.8 billion state budget. 

There were some unexpected revenue shortfalls to deal with. State revenues came up more than $300 million short, largely due to corporate tax credits. There was also a $100 million spike in Medicaid payments. 

Stateside 6.30.2016

Jun 30, 2016

Today, we look at Michigan's 2017 budget. And, we wonder why the insured are at greatest risk of falling through the mental health care safety net. 

Use NPR's new elections simulator tool to see what demographic shifts could help or hurt Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton this November.
Colleen P / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

It would take a major swing in voter demographics to turn Michigan red in the upcoming presidential election, according to a new tool developed by NPR.

The 270 Project, which maps likely state-level winners based on the demographics and turnout rates of voters, allows election junkies to sketch out November's presidential election between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump by playing with five different margins of victory and turnout rates in various demographics: white male, white female, Black, Hispanic, and the rest of the electorate. 

U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint.
Michigan Municipal League / dan kildee

The Washington, D.C. and Flint offices of U.S. Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Mich., are nearly 600 miles apart. But lead-tainted water has recently been a problem in both. 

Monday, the Architect of the Capitol's office sent an eye-opening advisory to staffers in the D.C. building housing Kildee's office.

"This week, the AOC received results within the Cannon House Office Building that indicate lead levels in drinking water sources are slightly above the EPA standard," wrote William Weidemeyer, the House Office Buildings superintendent. 

Lindsey Scullen/Michigan Radio

One Well Brewing in Kalamazoo opened its doors Tuesday night for Michigan Radio’s latest rendition of Issues & Ale, our community conversation event series.

For the second time this summer, Michigan Radio and the Center for Michigan met up with listeners to discuss why trust in government is eroding in our state – and how that trust might be restored.

Stateside 6.29.2016

Jun 29, 2016

Today, we talk with the founder of The First Cannabis Church of Logic and Reason in Lansing. We also talk with a GVSU music ensemble embarking on a tour commemorating our national parks.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette has been in the news a lot lately. This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry talks about the climbing price tag on Schuette's Flint water investigation, his appeal to Michigan voters, and whether it's likely he'll run for governor in 2018.

Attorney General Bill Schuette
Bill Schuette

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette says lawyers hired by Governor Rick Snyder at public expense are delaying progress in the criminal investigation of the Flint water crisis.

Legal troubles are piling for a Detroit-area state lawmaker. Representative Brian Banks, D-Harper Woods, faces new felony charges that he submitted fake paycheck records to get a loan.

Banks has eight prior felonies, and settled a sexual harassment lawsuit earlier this year. These newest charges date back to 2010. The charges filed in the Wayne County Circuit Court by the state Attorney General’s office include uttering and publishing and obtaining money under false pretenses.

Julie Plawecki
http://housedems.com/

The sudden death of state Rep. Julie Plawecki last weekend left a vacancy on the August Democratic primary ballot. 

Plawecki was running unopposed in the 11th House District, which includes Dearborn Heights, Inkster and Garden City. 

Jonathan Kinloch, chair of the 13th Congressional District Democratic Party, says precinct delegates will meet next week to start the process of finding a new candidate.

Stateside 6.28.2016

Jun 28, 2016

Today, we wonder what new abortion rulings in Texas could mean for Michigan. And, we learn about the charitable side of Ramadan in Michigan.

Pages