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Trump in Michigan on Sunday, Nov. 7th
Cheyna Roth

Michigan is getting battleground state attention from the presidential campaigns. Republican nominee Donald Trump paid a visit to Macomb County, and former President Bill Clinton toured the state to support Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

There’s some mystery about who’s trying to rally support for Libertarian Party candidates in two Michigan state House races.

In recent weeks, fliers promoting the Libertarians starting showing up in mail boxes at homes in the 61st (Portage, MI) and 91st (parts of Muskegon County) districts.   The fliers tout the Libertarians conservative credentials.   But the fliers don’t say who’s behind them. 

Bill Clinton in Flint.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Michigan is getting battleground state attention from the presidential candidates and their top emissaries. Republican nominee Donald Trump is in Macomb County today. Meanwhile, former President Bill Clinton stopped by a couple of churches in Flint before addressing a packed union hall in Lansing.

“We are stronger together,” Clinton told the crowd. “Michigan proves the virtues of solidarity. The UAW proves the virtues of solidarity.”

Clinton said he thinks the race would not be so close if there were more attention on issues.  

"Vote here" sign
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Some Hillary Clinton supporters are trying to convince third party voters in Michigan to “swap” their votes with Democrats in states where the presidential race is not considered close.  

TrumpTraders.org is a website connecting toss-up state Green and Libertarian voters with anti-Donald Trump voters in “safe” states like California.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The major-party candidates are making a final push to win Michigan.

Both Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton will be stopping in Michigan, once again, between now and Election Day. In fact, Trump will be making two stops.

Trump will rally supporters this afternoon in Sterling Heights. The GOP nominee is also expected to be back late Monday night for an election eve rally.

Trump’s running mate Mike Pence will campaign in Traverse City Monday. 

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

LANSING, Mich. (AP) - Michigan's status as a presidential battleground is no longer in question on the eve of the election.

  Barack Obama trounced Republicans here twice, making the state an afterthought the last eight years outside of the primaries. But in 2016, the race between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump has tightened and is possibly too close for comfort for Democrats.

Sign directing voters to polling place
Steven Depolo / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0 cropped

After a grueling, seemingly endless campaign season, it looks like we might actually make it to the other side of Election Day 2016. This Week in Review, Jack Lessenberry and I round-up some races to watch in Michigan. We also discuss whether there's potential for trouble at the polls and the slew of presidential candidates and surrogates who visited the state this week.


steve carmody / Michigan Radio

DETROIT (AP) - The fight over selfies at Michigan voting booths appears to be over for now.

A federal appeals court said Thursday it won't revisit the decision of one of its three-judge panels.

A federal judge in Grand Rapids had signed an injunction suspending Michigan's ban on ballot photos. But in a 2-1 decision, the order was set aside by the appeals court last week.

The challenge to Michigan's ban isn't dead. But the lawsuit by Joel Crookston won't be fully litigated until after the election.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Flint officials want more of a say in the state’s investment priorities in their city.

It’s been nearly a year since a state of emergency was declared in Flint because of lead contaminated drinking water.  

State officials point to millions of dollars spent during the past year to help Flint recover from its water crisis, including economic development projects.

But Flint leaders question the state’s spending priorities.

“People have seen us do a ribbon cutting at the Capitol Theater but we still don’t have a grocery store,” says Mayor Karen Weaver.   

Hillary Clinton speaking at Detroit's Eastern Market.
Cheyna Roth / MPRN

Hillary Clinton was back in Michigan today. The Democratic presidential nominee made a stop at Detroit’s Eastern Market for a rally.

Clinton was greeted by thousands of spectators and several times she encouraged them to vote and even take a friend when they go to the polls.

People kept coming into the venue even after Clinton started. Clinton clearly tried to woo Detroit’s large African American population. She referenced rival Donald Trump’s lawsuit for housing discrimination and his past characterization of black life in Detroit.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

The deadline for Flint’s commercial water customers to pay their delinquent bills was today.

Flint’s commercial customers owe the city more than a million dollars.   The city may start the process of cutting off their water service next week.

On Friday, the owners of two apartment complexes paid nearly $30 thousand each to bring their accounts up to date.    

“We’re glad that these account holders have stepped up and done the right thing,” said David Sabuda, Flint’s Interim Chief Financial Officer.

 

Today, we learn what to expect at the polls on Election Day. And, we head to Elderly Instruments for the next rendition of our series Artisans of Michigan

A list of 4 Election Day "Dos"... and 2 "Don'ts"

Nov 4, 2016
Voting sign.
flickr user justgrimes / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

This year, more than 7 million Michigan residents are registered to vote. That’s a record number for the state.

So, now that you’re registered, what should you expect on Election Day?

Flickr - Oregon Department of Transportation / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

In 1967, President Lyndon Johnson established a commission to investigate the causes of the urban uprisings  in Detroit and other cities over that summer. That commission, known as the Kerner Commission, came back with a blistering report on white attitudes toward black citizens.

According to the commission’s report, one of the major elements driving racial divisions was police treatment of black citizens. And it specifically warned against the militarization of law enforcement agencies.

A new documentary film demonstrates that, almost 50 years after the Kerner Commission issued its report, many police departments throughout the country have failed to heed that warning.

Suzanna Shkreli, the Democratic Party's candidate for Michigan's 8th Congressional District.
Suzanna Shkreli / Facebook

The race in the 8th Congressional District has been interesting this year.

First, Melissa Gilbert, the former child star of TV’s Little House on the Prairie, became the Democratic challenger to incumbent Republican Mike Bishop. Then, Gilbert dropped out and the Democrats had to pick a new candidate. They chose a Macomb County assistant prosecutor, Suzanna Shkreli.

Shkreli joined Stateside to talk about her campaign and what she hopes to bring to the voters in the 8th District

Voting sign.
flickr user justgrimes / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

Election Day is almost here at last, but there are still a lot of questions to be answered.

There’s been a lot of talk about poll challengers and poll watchers, and that’s an issue for the folks who are doing all the work on polling day.

Chris Thomas, director of elections at Michigan's Secretary of State, sat down with us today to talk through some of the questions we still have as November 8 approaches.

Longtime Macomb Public Works Commissioner Anthony Marrocco, left; retiring U.S. Rep. Candice Miller (R-Harrison Township), right.
via Macomb County, US Rep. Candice Miller

If you live in southeast Michigan, you’ve probably seen ads like this on your TV lately:

And this one:

user eyspahn / flickr http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

The U.S. Justice Department will keep a close eye on things in Michigan this election day.

But according to Detroit’s U.S. Attorney, that’s largely business as usual.

Barbara McQuade has appointed Dawn Ison, a “very experienced” prosecutor from her office’s public corruption unit, to be the District Election Officer.

Ison will “be on call” all day to take any complaints of potential federal election violations, from potential fraud to complaints of voter intimidation. She also has a direct line to the Justice Department in Washington if the need arises.

An absentee ballot in an envelope.
Nadya Peek / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

Lots of people have been surprised to learn that absentee voters in Michigan can change their ballots even if they've already cast them – as long as they do it by 4 p.m. on Monday.

"The old ballot will be voided," said Michigan Secretary of State spokesman Fred Woodhams. "It will not be counted."

Woodhams said absentee voters can request a re-do for any reason. But it's usually to correct a mistake, like voting for too many candidates or skipping portions of the ballot.

"This is really an uncommon thing," Woodhams said. "But it does happen from time to time."

Mike Pence
www.mikepence.house.gov

The election is days away, and Michigan is still getting quite a bit of attention from both major party presidential candidates.

Republican Vice Presidential candidate Mike Pence was in the Kalamazoo area with Texas Senator Ted Cruz to stump for presidential nominee Donald Trump. Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has been leading in the state polls, but her lead has shrunk recently.

During his speech, Pence encouraged Michiganders to vote.

Today, guests consider a question many may have for both presidential candidates: Where exactly will the jobs come from? And, we hear from a filmmaker hoping to provide an antidote to political ranting.

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

With a week to go before election night, discussing politics over drinks seemed a good idea Tuesday night.

That’s when Michigan Radio held its final Issues & Ale election preview event before the fateful Nov. 8.

The event took place at HopCat in Detroit and Michigan Radio’s senior news analyst Jack Lessenberry hosted.

Panelists were Brandon Dillon, chair of the Michigan Democratic Party, Aaron Foley, editor of BLAC Detroit Magazine, Republican consultant Stu Sandler and Zoe Clark, co-host of Michigan Radio’s It’s Just Politics.

While conversation moved through various topics, all of which related to the ballot Michigan voters will see next Tuesday, one idea continued to take the forefront: the polarization this election has caused between people in this country.

Subjects from the documentary film "Bring It to the Table".
BringItToTheTable.com

In five days, Americans will vote.

The deep distrust and dislike so many people feel for both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump has led to an exceptionally bitter campaign where political dialogue has all too often devolved into shouting profanities at each other.

Julie Winokur is a filmmaker who hopes to provide an antidote to political ranting. Her project and documentary Bring It To The Table is helping people stop bickering about politics. She is in Ann Arbor today to screen her film and to get people talking.

user Gage Skidmore / Flickr - http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

 

With the clock ticking down on the presidential campaign, Michigan and its 16 electoral votes are in the spotlight.

The candidates and the high-profile people campaigning for them are virtually tripping over each other as they criss-cross the state.

Yesterday Ivanka Trump, Donald Trump Jr., former President Bill Clinton, and Bernie Sanders were in Michigan. Today, Ivanka Trump is in Rochester, and Indiana Governor Mike Pence campaigns in Portage.

And there will be more rallies tomorrow. First Pence in Lansing, and then Hillary Clinton in Detroit’s Eastern Market, and Eric Trump will work his way through Michigan.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes believes all this activity proves the Mitten is in play.

steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Campaign spending on 15 pivotal state House seats tops $10 million, according to the Michigan Campaign Finance Network. 

Democrats need to win nine state House seats currently held by Republicans to wrest control of the lower chamber in Lansing. And both sides are spending heavily.

A Flint firefighters teaches adult volunteers how to escape from a smoky home.
steve carmody / Michigan Radio

Next week, people in Flint, Lansing and Royal Oak will vote on renewing public safety millages.

Flint police officers are spending their off-duty hours handing out information to promote the vote. Last night, firefighters showed volunteers how to escape a smoky fire, while city officials talked up the millage renewal.  

The renewal vote could be the difference between Flint hiring new firefighters or layoffs.

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

So you're sick of the election.

Good news: just a few days left.

Better news: we're taking you on a road trip around a divided part of the state, where we hear from Michiganders (including an activist 8-year-old) about their own lives, and how it's shaping their perspectives on this election.

Fried pickles, grass fed beef, and some excellent coffee are included. But maybe don't eat them all at the same time.

Jack Lessenberry
Michigan Radio

Election Day is less than a week away, and one of the most competitive races in the nation is right here in Michigan.

For our segment This Week in Michigan Politics, Jack Lessenberry and Doug Tribou talk about Democrat Gretchen Driskell's bid to win the state's 7th Congressional District over incumbent Republican Tim Walberg.

They also talk about the race in the 1st Congressional District that could be important on a national level and whether third-party candidates stand a chance in Michigan.


via michigan.org

The “Pure Michigan” tourism campaign is a net money-loser for the state.

At least that’s what researchers at the free-market Mackinac Center for Public Policy conclude in a new report.

McDaniel told us Republican voter turnout was more or less in line with what the party expected.
www.migop.org

A federal judge in New Jersey is asking the Michigan Republican Party to explain its Election Day anti-fraud plan.

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