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poverty rates

Kids at a public school in Flint.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Fewer children in Michigan lived in poverty in 2016, but the numbers are still grim.

The latest Kids Count Data Book says between 2010 and 2016, the state's child poverty rate dropped from 23 percent to 21 percent. However, that still means nearly half a million children lived below the poverty line in 2016.

Rates also remain particularly high for children of color. The report says in 2016, 42 percent of African American children and 30 percent of Latino children lived in poverty.

A Detroit street with trash on the side
Mike / creative commons http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

There are a lot of facts and figures to consider when it comes to poverty and well-being in Michigan. A new map makes that data much easier to track down.

The online map was developed by the University of Michigan's Poverty Solutions initiative. It's meant to help policymakers, community organizations, and the public better understand poverty in their communities.

Homeless
SamPac / creative commons

By official economic measures, this country has emerged from the Great Recession.

But recovery is not being felt in many neighborhoods in large and mid-sized cities.

Since 2000, the number of people living in high-poverty ghettos, barrios, and slums has nearly doubled from 7.2 million to nearly 14 million people.

That's the highest number of Americans living in high-poverty neighborhoods ever recorded. 

Young boy with stuffed animal
Guian Bolisay / Creative Commons http://michrad.io/1LXrdJM

A new report says more children in Michigan are growing up in low-income households now than during the Great Recession, even though the state's unemployment rate is the lowest it's been in a decade.

According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, nearly one in four Michigan children live in poverty, compared to one in five in 2008.

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The child poverty rate is a critical indicator of our nation’s economic and social health. Child poverty costs the U.S. some $500 billion annually in health and crime costs, as well as in lost productivity and wages.

However, a new report called Measuring Access to Opportunity from the Annie E. Casey Foundation questions the accuracy of the official poverty measure – a measure the nation has been using for the past half-century.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Giving women a stronger voice in Michigan is the goal of a new coalition.

MI-Lead is composed of more than 30 organizations, from civil liberties and reproductive rights to business associations and unions.