robots

Education
1:47 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

GM donates robots to Oakland Community College

OCC offers seven industrial robotics courses using robots such as this at their Auburn Hills Campus.
Credit OCC

The robotics students at Oakland Community College are getting a gift today. 

General Motors is donating robots that were once used to make cars on its assembly plant floors. They are going to the school's industrial robotics program at the Auburn Hills campus. 

The equipment is valued at $20,000  and will be used for hands-on training for students learning how to program and maintain robots.  

Dr. Timothy Meyer is chancellor at Oakland Community College. He says the donation will help prepare students for manufacturing jobs that can help boost the local economy. 

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Stateside
4:32 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

The chances you will lose your job to a robot are growing

ASIMO is a humanoid robot designed by Honda. ASIMO could take your conducting job.
Credit user: Vanillase / Wikimedia Commons

A recent Oxford University report estimates that robots could replace nearly half of the current U.S. workforce.

The report found that office administrators, sales personnel, and those in the service industry are among those at risk of losing their jobs to robots.

Robots have become common in many workplaces since General Motors installed the first robot at a plant in New Jersey in 1961 ("Unimate," as it was called, could weld and move parts that weighed up to 500 pounds).

So can humans keep up, or at least keep ahead of the technology that is changing the workforce?

These are especially important questions here in Michigan, with its historic ties to the auto industry that makes up about 40% of the global supply of industrial robots. 

Stephen Spurr, Chair of the Department of Economics and professor at Wayne State University, joined us today to explore the possibilities (You can listen to our interview with Spurr above.)

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Environment & Science
4:35 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Robots to spend winter under the ice in Lake Superior

Jay Austin (L) is an Associate Professor at the University of Minnesota-Duluth. He and assistant scientist Matt James are shown here prepping the device, an "autonomous moored platform" for its test dive.
Brett Groehler, Director of Photography UMD

Researchers are sending robots where no scientist has gone before: under the ice in Lake Superior during winter.

This week, researchers from the University of Minnesota-Duluth put their first robot in Lake Superior to test it. Think of them as robotic divers... they travel up and down on cables and collect data. The cables will be anchored to the bottom of the lake.

Erik Brown is one of the lead researchers and the acting director of the Large Lakes Observatory at UMD.  He says the harsh winters on Lake Superior make it too dangerous for people to go out on ships and collect data.

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