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sex offender registry

Ryan Grimes / Michigan Radio

The U.S. Supreme Court opened its new term yesterday, and one of its first actions has direct repercussions in Michigan.

The court decided it would not take up the state of Michigan’s appeal of a unanimous decision by the U.S. Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals. Thirteen months ago, the Sixth Circuit found the state was treating people as “moral lepers” with its sex offender registry.

There’s nothing I can say about the tragedy in Las Vegas, except this: some version of that will happen in Michigan, probably sooner rather than later.

The politicians are either in the pay of the gun lobby fanatics or resigned to the fact that they can’t possibly overcome them, so nothing will change.

Nothing, that is, unless and until people somehow demand that democracy and sanity be restored. So far, they haven’t, and the senseless killing will go on.

U.S. Supreme Court justice denies state's appeal to block sex offender ruling

Nov 15, 2016
Judge's gavel
Flickr user Joe Gratz / FLICKR - HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan has rejected Michigan's request to put a hold on a lower court decision about the state's sex offender registry law while the state appeals.

Kagan denied on Tuesday Attorney General Bill Schuette's emergency appeal for a stay.

A federal appeals court ruled in August that Michigan unconstitutionally puts additional restrictions on sex offenders long after their convictions.

Ryan Grimes/Michigan Radio

The sex offender registry is a popular tool. A lot of folks keep tabs on people moving into their neighborhood, just in case. It makes people feel safer.   

The United States Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that laws regarding Michigan's sex offender registry cannot be applied retroactively. 

The Michigan Supreme Court has seen a sudden rise in unanimous decisions during the 2015-2016 term.
Flickr user Joe Gratz / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Michigan cannot apply changes to the state’s sex offender registry law retroactively. That ruling came today from a federal appeals court. But the court also went further and said the law is flawed in many other ways and isn’t working the way it’s supposed to.

Miriam Aukerman is an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union. She says the Legislature should take another look at the law.

Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

DETROIT (AP) - The Michigan Supreme Court has agreed to look at the case of a man who's on the sex offender list for life, although his conviction was erased nearly 20 years ago.

  The man was 19 when he was charged with kissing and groping a 12-year-old girl in Wayne County. He pleaded guilty, but his conviction was completely erased in 1997 after he completed three years of probation. A law grants certain breaks to young offenders who stay out of trouble.

  Nonetheless, he's on the sex offender registry.