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Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

Stateside 1.16.2018

17 hours ago

Today on Stateside, we hear victims give emotional testimony as sentencing begins for Larry Nassar. And, with three kids, two houses, and a business, we learn why one Salvadoran couple might have to leave it all behind.

Stateside 1.15.2018

Jan 15, 2018

Oprah talked about rape survivor Recy Taylor at the Golden Globes. Today on Stateside, we talk to the Michigan historian who's been researching and telling Taylor's story for the last 15 years. Also today, MSU's Broad Museum spotlights two important Michigan artists.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 1.12.2018

Jan 12, 2018

Today on Stateside, state Sen. Casperson, R-Escanaba, defends proposed legislation that would give businesses more power within the Department of Natural Resources. We also hear the extreme evolution of video game music, and how one Michigan artisan transforms kayaks and canoes into art.

Stateside 1.11.2018

Jan 11, 2018

Today on Stateside, we meet a world champion ice carver. For her, spending hours in the freezer is just another day at the office. And, a psychiatrist explains why we should not be in the business of diagnosing the president. 

Stateside 1.10.2018

Jan 10, 2018

Today on Stateside, the state says there's enough money to keep the Children's Health Insurance Plan running until summer. And, in the midst of uncertainty, a science advisor to the Michigan PFAS Action Response Team says the new cleanup standard for PFAS chemicals errs on the "side of caution." Also today, country-rock and jazz artist Jill Jack reflects on two decades of making music in Michigan.

Stateside 1.9.2018

Jan 9, 2018

Today on Stateside, a law professor says Attorney General Bill Schuette has failed consumers. Schuette strongly disagrees. And, we discuss the game-changing effect of being able to see mental illness.

Stateside 1.8.2018

Jan 8, 2018

Today on Stateside: Will a rare indoor velodrome become Detroit's newest Olympic breeding ground? And, "mediocrity will perpetuate mediocrity," so how do the Red Wings break free? Also today, a trans opera singer discusses his risky decision to follow his dreams. 

Stateside 1.5.2018

Jan 5, 2018

Today on Stateside, Congressman Paul Mitchell says the budget and infrastructure are some of the GOP's main priorities for 2018. We also hear from Flint resident Carma Lewis. She explains the challenges she and her neighbors still face today, two years after Gov. Snyder declared a "state of emergency" in Flint.

Stateside 1.4.2018

Jan 4, 2018

Congress is starting the New Year with a hangover from the old one. Today on Stateside, we get the Democrats' take on the issues from Rep. Dan Kildee, D-Flint. And, we learn how Battle Creek students are getting emotional and social support in a new type of classroom.

Stateside 1.3.2018

Jan 3, 2018

Should you worry about catching hepatitis A at Southeast Michigan restaurants? That answer comes today on Stateside. Also today, we learn that without a legislative fix, the new federal tax bill could mean Michiganders pay higher state income taxes. And, a sex trafficking victim advocate says, "There's no place for rescued kids and that's horrible."

Stateside 1.2.2018

Jan 2, 2018

2018 feels like a monumental year in politics. Today on Stateside, we discuss which way Michigan voters will swing. Also today, a psychologist explains why we're so easily fooled by fake stories online. And, we hit the streets to capture some of our fellow Michiganders' hopes and dreams for the new year.

Today on Stateside, Michigan Radio's sports commentator explains why Detroit was your city in 2017 if you like mediocrity in sports. And, a father says former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar assaulted his teenage daughter while under criminal investigation. 

Today on Stateside, former Congressman and longtime tax reformer Dave Camp says the tax bill is a "positive move forward." And, did the federal government spend $21 trillion that wasn't authorized by Congress? And finally, we hear from the head of the "Harvard of Santa Schools."

PFAS chemicals have contaminated water across Michigan. Today on Stateside, we learn what that means for public health and clean up. And, in honor of Star Wars: The Last Jedi, we visit Terra Prime Light Armory in Ann Arbor, where athletes spar with lightsabers.

Today on Stateside, an economist explains why "the average family doesn't really get a whole lot" from the $1.46 trillion tax overhaul. And, the mastermind behind Jumanji gives his take on the updated film version. We also learn why it's not hard for foster kids to just disappear, and what a Traverse City author is doing to try to change that. Finally, we learn why it's important to recruit black, male teachers.

Today on Stateside, an alleged victim of Larry Nassar says MSU president Lou Anna Simon's apology was "heartless and empty." We also discuss what it means to be neighbors again for black and Jewish communities in Detroit. And, we review the good, the bad, and the ugly that came out of Lansing in 2017.

A lot could happen in the coming days. Congress is poised to deal with several major issues, including the Republicans' tax overhaul and funding for the Children's Health Insurance Program. U.S. Senator Debbie Stabenow joined Stateside today to discuss those issues, and more. Also on the show today, EMU officials defend the university's contract to boost online degrees, saying professors' concerns are unwarranted.

Women don't just face sexual assault at work. Today on Stateside, we hear how it happens at home too. And, we talk to a Detroit designer working to bring more black women into architecture and urban planning. (Right now, only .3% of architects are black women.) We also hear why two teachers left Michigan to work in another state.

Today on Stateside, we discuss why the heat on MSU has gone from "zero to 100." We also talk to subjects of the new documentary on Flint that looks for "inspiration in the wake of desperation." And, we answer this MI Curious question: Why do so many international Olympic figure skaters train in Michigan?

Today on Stateside, we discuss whether people will revolt when artificial intelligence comes for white-collar jobs. We also get an update on the Hepatitis A outbreak continuing in southeast Michigan, and we learn what to do if you're sexually harassed at work. 

Today on Stateside, we hear why Michigan could soon be the only state to not mandate financial disclosures from lawmakers. And, we discuss whether the Democratic Party is taking black voters for granted.

Today on Stateside, we hear from an opponent of the recreational marijuana ballot proposal, and we discuss former MSU sports doctor Larry Nassar's sentence to 60 years in federal prison. We also talk about whether "passive homes" are the future, and how dog sledding joined the pack of popular winter sports in Michigan.

Who might run to replace U.S. Rep. John Conyers in Congress? That answer comes today on Stateside. And, we discuss a survey that shows sexism and sexual harassment persist throughout the auto industry. We also hear why soccer analyst Alexi Lalas doesn't see Detroit winning the bid for an MLS team – or at least, not yet.

In the second edition of UN/DIVIDED, a three-part series from Michigan Radio, we learn why school choice led to school closures in Albion. We also discuss Rep. John Conyers' resignation from Congress.

Today on Stateside, the Lansing State Journal's executive editor explains the front-page editorial that calls on Lou Anna Simon, president of Michigan State University, to resign over her handling of sexual assault and harassment problems. And, the former vice chairman of General Motors explains what he believes self-driving cars will mean for Detroit's future. Also today, we give you the first installment of our series UN/DIVIDED, a look Marshall's takeover of Albion schools and what it's meant for families.

How do you fill a vacant seat in Congress? Should our government work more with the private sector to build roads and bridges? And should the state seize control of local government pension funds? We bring you those answers today on Stateside.

Today on Stateside, a Muslim community leader says President Trump's retweets of anti-Muslim videos is "disappointing" and "disheartening." And, a columnist with the Detroit Free Press explains why we need to "look at who is getting a pass" in sexual abuse investigations.

Today on Stateside, we talk to a physician who nearly died at her own hospital. Now, she's calling on medical staffers everywhere to be more empathetic. Also today, a deer specialist explains chronic wasting disease's impact on animals this year and what the Department of Natural Resources has learned from deer submitted by hunters for testing. And, Enbridge defends its agreement with the state on the Line 5 pipeline.

Today on Stateside, a member of the state Pipeline Safety Advisory Board explains why the state's agreement with Enbridge "mostly goes in the wrong direction." And, in a holiday rendition of Theater Talk, we learn what's playing now on Michigan stages.

Today on Stateside, U.S. Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., says the process for handling harassment complaints in Congress needs "immediate changes." And, a Hall of Fame teacher explains why classrooms of the future should not include whiteboards and markers.

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