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Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

Stateside 8.18.2017

Aug 18, 2017

Today on Stateside, we talk about where things stand now with changes for marijuana in Michigan's future. And, we learn what it takes to buy and preserve a Great Lakes lighthouse.

Stateside 8.17.2017

Aug 17, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how Michigan State University is tapping parking lots for renewable energy and big savings. And, while "totality" will elude Michigan during Monday's solar eclipse, we hear an expert's advice for how best to watch it.

Stateside 8.16.2017

Aug 16, 2017

It's been 30 years since Flight 255 crashed in Romulus. Today on Stateside, two reporters say that day is still impossible to forget. And, we hear why one researcher says the safety of birth control pills is not "sufficiently well established."

Stateside 8.15.2017

Aug 15, 2017

Today, we talk about what Justin Dawson's case reveals about the way our courts handle defendants who are mentally ill or developmentally disabled. And the state is refunding nearly $21 million to tens of thousands of people it wrongly accused of unemployment fraud. One advocate calls that a drop in the bucket.

Stateside 8.14.2017

Aug 14, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn why white supremacists carried the Red Wings logo in Charlottesville, and about the ideology they ascribe to. And, we hear a Flint man's story of being jailed for nearly a year before getting psychiatric help. 

Stateside 8.11.2017

Aug 11, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear from the two sides at odds over development plans for the Saugatuck Dunes. And we learn how the legacy of discriminatory housing policies in Michigan continues to shape metro areas today.

Stateside 8.10.2017

Aug 10, 2017

Today on Stateside, a health expert says it's unacceptable for the state to be behind on asbestos inspections. And we hear why one group offers black women a safe place to grieve, away from the pressure to always be strong. We also learn why Michigan needs more foster parents, and which waterfall in Michigan is the tallest.

Stateside 8.9.2017

Aug 9, 2017

Are classroom troublemakers a disruption or a warning sign? We discuss that question today on Stateside. We also hear about the time NASA gave Michigan a piece of the moon and it wound up in the governor's garage. And, we break down a recent case of "river rage" on the St. Clair River.

Stateside 8.8.2017

Aug 8, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear an official from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources explain which kinds of Asian carp threaten the Great Lakes and what a long-anticipated U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' report means for the fight against the voracious invaders. And, we hear Secretary of State Ruth Johnson explain why new voting machines used for elections in 11 counties today are "better in so many ways."

Stateside 8.7.2017

Aug 7, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn why incompetence, not fraud, is the likely cause of election irregularities in Michigan. And, we break down what you need to know about perfluorinated chemicals, aka PFCs. We also take a trip to Detroit's new public cricket field, the first one that's opened in the city since the 1970s. 

Stateside 8.4.2017

Aug 4, 2017

Today on Stateside, we get an update on the toxic algal blooms on Lake Erie, the same kind that shut down Toledo's water system three years ago. And a new report indicates that past Michigan legislatures have committed the state to an ever-shrinking general fund. We talk with Ken Sikkema, former Republican legislative leader and senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants, and former Democratic legislator Vicki Barnett about that.

Aubrey Pollard about a year before his death.
Courtesy Thelma Pollard Gardner / via Bridge Magazine

This Friday, the movie simply titled “Detroit” debuts nationwide.

It depicts the most notorious single incident of the 1967 Detroit rebellion — the brutal police killings of three black teens at the Algiers Motel.

The still-contested events of that night at the Algiers Motel have already been written about extensively. A surviving witness called it “a night of horror and murder” worse than anything he had experienced as a soldier in Vietnam.

But after multiple trials, none of the officers involved were ever convicted of any crime.


Stateside 8.3.2017

Aug 3, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear from the family and lawyer of Raheel Siddiqui, a Muslim-American Marine recruit who died after just 11 days of boot camp on Parris Island. His family and lawyer insist Raheel's death was "not caused by any misconduct of his own." And, we hear an update on Michigan's juvenile lifers – inmates who were sentenced to life without parole when they were juveniles. Are they getting the shot at a second chance that the U.S. Supreme Court said they should?

Stateside 8.2.2017

Aug 2, 2017

Today on Stateside, a Michigan health insurer says premiums will rise sharply if the White House pulls cost-sharing subsidies. And, we learn about Michigan's historic Goose Lake – a music festival that was once hailed as "Michigan's Woodstock." 

Stateside 8.1.2017

Aug 1, 2017

Today on Stateside, a guest cautions others about the power of rip currents after almost drowning in Lake Michigan. And, a teacher describes her quest to help a promising student in the classroom, and later in his prison cell.

Stateside 7.31.2017

Jul 31, 2017

Today, we hear about the new breast pump that allows moms to "keep on keepin' on" at work, in the car, or while cooking. And, usually people are "called out" for mental illness. We hear from two Michigan poets taking a national tour to "call people in."

Stateside 7.28.2017

Jul 28, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear why the James & Grace Lee Boggs School doesn't shy away from teaching kids about the 1967 rebellion in Detroit. And, we learn why one scientist says academics shouldn't be afraid to "get political." 

Stateside 7.27.2017

Jul 27, 2017

Today, we hear Detroit cast members explain why they hope the new film will spark conversations about race relations. And, nuns recall their role in the 1967 rebellion. They also talk about the injustices still troubling the city today.

Stateside 7.26.2017

Jul 26, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how out-of-touch city leaders energized black pastors to redouble their activism efforts after the 1967 rebellion. And, we learn why cities struggling with unpaid water bills could learn from Philadelphia's new approach.

Stateside 7.25.2017

Jul 26, 2017

Today, we speak with a Great Lakes lawmaker who's tired of waiting for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' overdue study on Asian carp. And, we learn about "After/Life," a play that brings forth women's voices from Detroit's 1967 rebellion.

Stateside 7.24.2017

Jul 24, 2017

Today on Stateside, Michigan Radio's It's Just Politics team explains where things stand in the race for governor in Michigan. And, two brothers relive Detroit's 1967 rebellion, which they say helped create a "permanent underclass."

Stateside 7.21.2017

Jul 21, 2017

 

Today on Stateside, a Republican announces his campaign for governor. Plus, we talk with the author of a book that covers 300 years of black history in Detroit, including more than one civil disturbance. 

Stateside 7.20.2017

Jul 21, 2017

Today on Stateside, how the Detroit Free Press owners unveiled a new online look for the paper and outraged its customers. Then, what history teaches us about the tension between Detroit's white police force and its African American citizens.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 7.19.2017

Jul 19, 2017

Today on Stateside, we get to know the family at the center of the 1967 unrest in Detroit. And, we take a stroll with the Anishinaabe water walkers as they trek from Minnesota to Quebec to honor and protect the Great Lakes.

Stateside 7.17.2017

Jul 19, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn how a secretive development could force drastic change on small-town Durand. And, a historian explains how the divide between "White Detroit" and "Black Detroit" led to the city's 1967 rebellion.

Stateside 7.18.2017

Jul 18, 2017

Today, we hear what it was like to be a young, black police officer in Detroit during the 1967 rebellion. We also learn how a Detroit native and former Canadian Football League player ended up in a Chinese jail.

Stateside 7.14.17

Jul 14, 2017

Today on Stateside, we talk to a woman who got job training to get into the workforce and ran into another hurdle. Also, in light of the discontent of the working class some conservatives are thinking maybe unions make sense, if they could be tweaked. Plus, we visit with our latest “Artisan of Michigan.”

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Stateside 7.13.2017

Jul 13, 2017

Today on Stateside, we get to know a low-income family that scrapes by on government assistance and odd jobs. And, we hear how this weekend's festival on Belle Isle aims to create community connections through wind, wind crafts, and string.

Stateside 7.12.2017

Jul 12, 2017

Today on Stateside, we answer listener Olivia Cushway's question: "How did Pere Cheney become a ghost town?" And, we hear why there are fewer and fewer avenues to the middle class for low-income families.

Stateside 7.11.2017

Jul 11, 2017

Today, we hear why the state's largest hospital system would prefer to repair the Affordable Care Act, not start from scratch. And, we learn why the Selfridge Air National Guard Base aims to become a home for the new F-35 fighter jet.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

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