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Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

On the program today we'll talk about #MeToo. Plus, May Erlewine talks about songs on her latest album. And, we’ll hear about underserved farmers fighting the government.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Today on Stateside, we sit down with three teachers to learn what it's really like to be a new educator in Michigan. The author of a new book explains why teams that lack diversity do worse when it comes to solving big business problems. Also today, we hear what's in the state's new "plain English" draft fixes to the "dumb and dangerous" lead rule.

Today on Stateside, a representative from the Michigan Lottery talks school aid, transparency, and what's up with the repeat winners. Also today, despite the teacher shortage, the Detroit schools superintendent says the district is building momentum. And, new legislation aims to curb state agency power, but at what cost?

Today on Stateside, a new committee opposing a ballot initiative on gerrymandering may hint at a partisan fight ahead, and the former EPA administrator defends Obama-era fuel efficiency standards, saying they're good for health.

Today on Stateside, we hear how Kent County is looking for cancer clusters near Wolverine tannery dump sites. And, Jeff Daniels talks about Flint, his upcoming play about race and poisoned water. The Grass Lake schools superintendent also explains why the district chose to let a transgender student use the boys' bathroom. 

People are dying in Macomb County's overcrowded jail. Today on Stateside, we learn what role the courts play in those deaths.

Also today, a former police chief says private police bills would bring "mercenary policing" to Michigan communities. And, climate activist Bill McKibben says we've made "nowhere near enough" progress in combating climate change. Finally, we cheers to the weekend with a fall drink of Ann Arbor-made whiskey.

Eighteen people have died in the Macomb County Jail since 2012. Today on Stateside, we hear one woman's story. Also today, we learn how Michigan's gun control movement lost big 16 years ago, and why Michiganders should thank "TV money" for the late MSU-UM kickoff this weekend.

There's a new tactic that public universities, government offices, and other public entities in Michigan are using to avoid providing information to taxpayers and journalists -- who have a legal right to know what's going on. Today on Stateside, we'll learn more from a First Amendment attorney. Also, fish may not need bicycles, but at one point in Michigan history, they needed a train.  

What should you do if you think your Equifax account was breached? That answer comes today on Stateside. And, in the wake of Hurricane Maria, we hear how Michigan's Puerto Rican community is mobilizing for those in need.

After you flush, where does it go? Today on Stateside, we learn the answer is no longer a solution in many communities. And, we learn what anxiety disorders look like in kids, and how to treat them. 

Stateside 9.29.2017

Sep 29, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how design in Detroit's neighborhoods can involve the people, and why the world would keep warming even if we stopped emitting greenhouse gases. And, State Sen. Patrick Colbeck, R-Canton, explains why he's running for governor in 2018.

Stateside 9.28.2017

Sep 28, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn Toledo water is safe to drink despite bacteria blooms, "but we're not out of the woods yet." And, campus sexual assault researchers say the focus on due process comes at victims' expense.

Stateside 9.27.2017

Sep 27, 2017

Today, the federal Education Department rolls back an Obama-era guideline on campus sexual assault, opening fresh debate over how schools handle the problem.

Plus, the fallout over the director of the Michigan State Police sharing a Facebook post calling NFL players who kneel during the national anthem "degenerates."

Stateside 9.26.2017

Sep 26, 2017

Today on Stateside we discuss what white people can do about racism in America and we hear how a new package of bills could mean big cuts to Michigan's high auto insurance premiums.

Stateside 9.25.2017

Sep 25, 2017

Today on Stateside, Michigan Radio's sports commentator John U. Bacon explains how President Trump divided football fans this weekend, and how the Lions "got screwed yet again." And, back from the Mackinac Republican Leadership Conference, Michigan Radio's It's Just Politics team details how support for the president was widespread, yet divided in tone.

Stateside 9.22.2017

Sep 22, 2017

Today on Stateside, Senator Gary Peters calls the latest ACA repeal attempt "worse than the last," and we hear why Flint charges against the director of the Department of Health and Human Services may seriously inhibit state government decision making. We also learn ICE raids increased across the state this week, and why natural disasters in certain countries prompt more immigration to the United States. And, we head into the weekend cheering whiskey made from beer.

Stateside 9.21.2017

Sep 21, 2017

Today on Stateside, a diver shares what it's like to photograph Great Lakes shipwrecks. And, a conservation biologist explains why killing coyotes is an impractical, unethical, and not always successful way to keep livestock safe. We also hear how education, business, and labor leaders are teaming up to help kids find pathways to technical careers.

Stateside 9.20.2017

Sep 20, 2017

Governor Snyder signed legislation into law today that could greatly increase corporate and special interest spending on political campaigns. Today on Stateside, a watchdog says the new law will make it harder to trace political donations. And, now that China plans to ban cars powered by fossil fuels, where does that leave American manufacturers?

Stateside 9.19.2017

Sep 19, 2017

Today, we hear what went down at Monday's meeting of the Michigan Pipeline Safety Advisory Board, including a plan for a risk assessment of Enbridge's aging Line 5. And, we take a listen to the political music of Eminem, Kid Rock, and Insane Clown Posse.

Stateside 9.18.2017

Sep 18, 2017

Today on Stateside, U.S. Rep. Sander Levin says the White House is gutting funding for programs that help people sign up for health care. And Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon explains why the red zone was kryptonite for the Wolverine offense this weekend.

Stateside 9.15.17

Sep 15, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear from a Republican Congressman who voted against cutting the EPA budget by 25 percent. Plus, we get some commentary on the Michigan Legislature's move to allow unlimited amounts of dark money for election campaigns.

Stateside 9.14.2017

Sep 14, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how Oakland County is fighting efforts to fix a "woefully inadequate" system for people who can't afford lawyers. And, we discuss what it means to be black and Muslim in Michigan. 

Stateside 9.13.2017

Sep 13, 2017

What happens if a mysterious company becomes the Monsanto of marijuana? That answer comes today on Stateside. And, we hear former Governor James Blanchard explain why he supports Gretchen Whitmer for governor.

Stateside 9.12.2017

Sep 12, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear state House Speaker Tom Leonard, R-DeWitt, break down the House of Representatives' legislative priorities for this session. And, we learn why Howell is considered the KKK capital of Michigan.

Stateside 9.11.2017

Sep 11, 2017

Today on Stateside, we revisit the day Muhammad Ali went to Ground Zero. And, we learn why one researcher think's Amazon's second headquarters competition is a "red herring."

Stateside 9.8.2017

Sep 11, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn about the racist history of Albert Cobo, and the complicated push to rid Detroit of his name. We also hear how one school district looks beyond standardized tests toward real world "flexible learning." And, we learn why conservations are asking urbanites to help lure bat populations to cities.

Stateside 9.7.2017

Sep 7, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear about a bitter brotherly feud, and how Kellogg's Corn Flakes reimagined American breakfast. And, we learn about Detroit's "Femology," a collaborative space tailored to businesswomen.

Stateside 9.6.2017

Sep 6, 2017

As state lawmakers get back to work, we learn why auto insurance and pension reform top the Lansing agenda on today's Stateside. Also, an emphasis on STEM and skilled trades is all the rage these days--but what about the value of a liberal arts education?

Stateside 9.5.2017

Sep 5, 2017

Today on Stateside, we take a trip to Bach Elementary School in Ann Arbor to hear how students are feeling on the first day of school. Also on the show, a Michigan DREAMer says DACA changed his life "drastically," but today he faces uncertainty. And, a psychiatrist offers tips for returning college students on how to keep stress in check.

Stateside 9.1.2017

Sep 1, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear LaMarr Monson describe what it feels like to be free 21 years after a wrongful murder conviction. We also learn about an app in development to help teachers fight their own implicit bias in the classroom. And, after disappearing from Michigan, peregrine falcons are making a comeback and nesting on skyscrapers across the state.

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