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Third Coast Kings

The Third Coast Kings is a seven member funk and soul band from Ann Arbor.

Sean Ike is the front man of the band. When he’s on stage, he commands your attention. You will almost always see him jumping and dancing around his microphone, dressed in a brightly colored suit, shooting deep stares to the audience and occasionally wiping the sweat that drips off his shaved head with a hand towel he keeps nearby.  

“If you give us five or six songs, if you are at least not tapping your foot, they should check your pulse or we’re doing it wrong,” Ike says.

Not only do the Third Coast Kings draw people to the dance floor across Michigan, they also have a large following in Japan.

A dive team works on Line 5 under the Straits of Mackinac.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

The oil spill disaster on the Kalamazoo River got many in Michigan wondering about the state of Michigan's oil and gas pipelines.

Today on Stateside:

  • Will a market-based approach prevent an Enbridge Energy spill in the Great Lakes?
  • Clayton Eshleman spent decades translating the works of  renowned Peruvian poet Cesar Vallejo.
  • It's been a year since that massive ice storm knocked out power to much of Lansing. What’s changed?
  • We hear about a funk and soul band from Ann Arbor called the Third Coast Kings.

Today on Stateside:

  • A look back at the year for the auto industry
  • An interview with author Kathleen Flinn about her latest book, Burnt Toast Makes You Sing Good (archive segment)
  • How Detroit’s sound influenced an entire generation (archive segment)
GM had an event-filled year. The company announced more shifts at assembly plants, like at this one - the Wentzville Assembly plant in Missouri. It also dealt with the fallout from the ignition switch recall.
GM

For the world's automakers 2014 was full of good news and some very, very bad news.

We take a look back at the year with Michele Krebs, director of Automotive Relations with the Auto Trader Group, and Tracy Samilton, Michigan Radio's auto reporter.

Listen to our conversation with them below.

Today on Stateside:

  • Gov. Rick Snyder and legislative leaders have struck a deal on road funding.
  • A visit to Flatsnoots Christmas Trees in Ann Arbor. Spending time with owner Duke Wagatha is all part of the experience of finding that perfect evergreen.
  • Michigan historians Priscilla and Larry B. Massie of Allegan joined us.
  • Don Julin and Billy Strings. The bluegrass duo sits down with Stateside's Emily Fox.
  • Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes talks about where Gov. Snyder will find his “second-term mojo."
  • Is businessman Dan Gilbert poaching Oakland County companies to fill his downtown buildings?
Dan Gilbert, Quicken Loans Founder and CEO
Quicken Loans

There was some recent sand-throwing between Oakland County's feisty executive, L. Brooks Patterson, and Dan Gilbert, who is arguably Detroit's No. 1 booster, both in terms of buying, building, and enticing companies to move to Detroit. 

Billy Strings and Don Julin

If you haven't heard of Don Julin and Billy Strings, then you probably haven't been hanging around Traverse City. 

Duke Wagatha's Christmas tree lot in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Mark Brush / Michigan Radio

Go for the ambience, the free eggnog, and, oh yeah, a Christmas tree.

At Flatsnoots Christmas Trees in Ann Arbor, visiting owner Duke Wagatha is all part of the experience of finding that perfect evergreen.

Michigan lawmakers want you to decide on roads.
Steve Carmody / Michigan Radio

Gov. Rick Snyder and legislative leaders have struck a deal on road funding.

After many, many closed-door meetings, the announcement was made at a news conference at the Capitol.

To get to more than $1 billion in funding, the centerpiece of the plan is an increase in the state sales tax. It’s something voters would have to decide in a ballot question in May.

Snyder says that’s OK with him.

Listen to our conversation with Rick Pluta and Zoe Clark below.

  If you're dashing around trying to take care of your holiday to-do list, it might be time to think back and remember a time in Michigan when a bowl of oyster stew was your Christmas dinner and a $1.75 pair of gloves took care of your Christmas gift for the wife!

moare / Morguefile

Federal law guarantees that children with disabilities have equal access to education. But what that actually looks like for Michigan kids very much depends upon where you live.

An investigation by Michigan Radio's State of Opportunity project and Bridge Magazine has turned up disparities in the way schools choose which students should be in special education and the actual level of those services. Sarah Alvarez with State of Opportunity joined us, along with Bridge Magazine writer Ron French.

*Listen to Alvarez and French above

Satori World Medical / Flickr

Open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act is in its second year. Many of the benchmark plans that were available for 2014 are changing for 2015.

How has enrollment been going and what do we need to know as we enroll? Marianne Udow-Phillips is the Director of the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation at the University of Michigan.

*Listen to Udow-Phillips above.

Chestnut Growers, Inc.

During this holiday season, we hear Nat King Cole crooning about those chestnuts again. Did you know that Michigan leads the nation in chestnut production?

Yet most of us have never eaten a chestnut. That is something Dennis Fulbright wants to change. He's a plant pathologist and professor with Michigan State University.

JazzyJeff85 / Flickr

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has set new standards of nutrition for school meals, school vending machines, and snack bars. The agency wants to limit fat, sugar, sodium and calories.

A study by a team at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research shows how badly school menus and food offerings needed to be overhauled.

Yvonne Terry-McElrath is an author of the study.

*Listen to Terry-McElrath below

LGBT flag.
Guillaume Paumier / Flickr

In Michigan, you can be fired or denied housing for being gay. That's because there are no LGBT protections in the state's Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act.

The story of  teacher Gerry Crane illustrates that. Crane, a gay high school music teacher, was outed by his students, forced to resign, and several months later died of a stress-related heart attack. 

Christine Yared, an attorney from Grand Rapids, is writing a book about Crane's life. The book will be called "Gay Teacher: A Story About Love, Hate, and Lessons Yet To Be Learned."

Today on Stateside:

  • Open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act enters its second year. Marianne Udow-Phillips, director of the Center for Healthcare Research and Transformation at the University of Michigan, was on the show to discuss it.
  • Federal law guarantees that children with disabilities have equal access to education, but is that really the case in practice? Sarah Alvarez with State of Opportunity and Bridge Magazine writer Ron French discuss what's actually the case for Michigan kids.

Gov. Rick Snyder.
Michigan Municipal League / Flickr

Michigan has faced and tackled many issues in 2014. Zoe Clark talked to Gov. Rick Snyder about the past year, and what he'd like to achieve in the future.

A bill allowing suspicion-based drug testing for people on welfare has passed the Michigan House and Senate and is awaiting the governor’s decision.

Snyder says he still needs more time to review the bill in detail. A number of states have already passed similar policies, and Snyder says he is paying close attention to their effects.

the nyerges family
Courtesy of Jane-Ann Nyerges

It's been over 40 years since the Michigan Chemical Corporation/Velsicol made a catastrophic mistake that affected millions of Michigan residents.

The company from St. Louis, Michigan, shipped a toxic flame retardant chemical to the Farm Bureau Service instead of a nutritional supplement. That chemical was PBB or polybrominated biphenyl.

PBB was mixed into livestock feed, but it took a year to discover the accident. Millions of consumers ate contaminated milk, meat, and eggs during this time.

Jane-Ann Nyerges was one of the farming families whose lives were changed after the PBB contamination.

Today on Stateside:

  • Zoe Clark discusses the past year with Gov. Rick Snyder, and what Snyder hopes to achieve in the future.
  • Patrick DeHaan of Gasbuddy.com explains why gas prices are they lowest they’ve been in five years.
  • Former Kellogg lobbyist George Franklin discusses his memoir that details his time in Washington.
  • With the 40th anniversary of the terrible Michigan Chemical Corporation PBB contamination, we talk to Jane-Ann Nyerges about the effects her family is still living with
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics says teens need to sleep later. Ann Arbor is considering moving to a later high school start time. School Board secretary Andy Thomas talks to us about the pros and cons of the possible change.
School Bus
Nicolae Gerasim / Flickr

The American Academy of Pediatrics says teens need to sleep later. The Academy is challenging America’s schools to not start high school classes until at least 8:30 a.m.

user futureatlas.com / Flickr

Oil prices worldwide continue to slide. Gas prices haven't been this low in five years, with Michigan averaging $2.41 a gallon.

Kellogg logo
Flickr user EthelRedThePetrolHead / Flickr

Lobbyists aren't the most well liked people, but George Franklin, attorney and former lobbyist who became the Vice President of World Wide Government Relations for the Kellogg Company, would like to change your perception of them.

Franklin is currently the head of Franklin Public Affairs in Kalamazoo and recently wrote a memoir about his time in Washington entitled "Raisin Bran and Other Cereals: 30 Years of Lobbying for the Most Famous Tiger in the World."

Sander J. Rabinowitz / Wikipedia

His former boss remarked that Bill Bonds could "read the telephone book and make you pay attention." The legendary Detroit TV anchor died over the weekend at age 82.

User Motown31 / Creative Commons

The Education Achievement Authority has a permanent new leader. Some six months after being appointed interim chancellor, Veronica Conforme has been named to that permanent position. What has she seen in these first months, and what are her goals for the district?

*Listen to our conversation with Conforme below

pinehurst19475 / Flickr

To anyone who's taking a first-time drive, the border between Detroit and the city of Grosse Pointe Park provides a stunning contrast. Grosse Pointe Park is the western-most of the five Grosse Pointes. And driving east or west on streets like Jefferson, Charlevoix, and Kercheval will give you a real eye-opening lesson in racial and economic disparity.

But you cannot drive the main thoroughfare of Kercheval. That's because Grosse Pointe Park erected farmer's market sheds right in the middle of the street at the Detroit border. 

Luther College_Photo Bureau / Flickr

Is Michigan just too modest, too Midwestern in the way it treats its prominent entrepreneurs? Jeff DeGraff thinks the answer might be yes.

DeGraff is a clinical professor of management and organizations at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan and our partner for the Next Idea. Jeff DeGraff has two questions for listeners:

How would you identify the best and the brightest? And what kinds of help would you give them?

Today on Stateside:

  • The EAA announces Veronica Conforme as its new chancellor after she spent six months as the district's interim chancellor. Conforme discusses what the EAA has done so far and what progress she hopes to make.
  • Legendary TV anchor Bill Bonds died this past Saturday at the age of 82. Dick Kernen of the Specs Howard School of Media Arts who had previously worked with Bonds briefly discusses his life and impact on broadcasting.
  • Is Michigan doing enough for its young entrepreneurs? Jeff DeGraff is here to talk about his thoughts on what Michigan can and should do to encourage economic growth and development through nurturing young entrepreneurs.
  • The border between Detroit and Grosse Pointe Park offers an eye-opening lesson in racial and economic disparity. Reporter Bill McGraw has written about the farmer’s market sheds in the middle of Kercheval at the Detroit border and what their construction says about the relationship between the two cities.
  • A new bar has opened up in Ann Arbor. The Brillig Dry Bar doesn’t serve alcohol. Its creator, Nic Sims, discusses why she decided to open a dry bar and the response she has received so far. You can visit the website here.
Detroit skyline.
user JSFauxtaugraphy / Flickr

Today a special edition of Stateside with the Detroit Journalism Cooperative on Detroit after bankruptcy:

  • We examine how the city is trying to get public services back on track with new initiatives for street light replacement and more buses on the road. 
  • Residents discuss the benefits of living in Detroit’s rich cultural environment and weigh these costs with continuing to deal with crime in the area.
  • Many of the issues that led the city of Detroit to bankruptcy are also affecting Detroit schools. We review how Detroit’s education system has adjusted to the decline in funding and enrollment.
  • Detroit’s central business district has gained attention after large acquisitions from private corporations, but many residents worry this growth is bypassing neighborhoods.
  • More companies are also seeing Detroit as an opportunity, establishing themselves in the area and hiring more residents of the city.

Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan / Flickr

Detroit emergency manager Kevyn Orr resigned today. Gov. Rick Snyder had a little send-off for him in Detroit. Here to discuss that and other Michigan politics is the It’s Just Politics team, Rick Pluta and Michigan Radio’s resident political junkie Zoe Clark.

Click on the link above to hear Rick and Zoe discuss Orr's resignation and Michigan politics 

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