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Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

Stateside 4.21.2017

Apr 21, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear why a porn site funded a University of Michigan student's research on monogamous rodents. And, Flint's Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha explains why she's going to this weekend's March for Science.

Stateside 4.20.2017

Apr 20, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear the answer to listener Ashley Lewis' question: What's the origin of the Sleeping Bear Dunes story? And, we learn why one tech executive chose Ann Arbor over Paris.

Stateside 4.19.2017

Apr 19, 2017

Today on Stateside, GOP Rep. Upton explains why he opposes the rumored closure of EPA's Region 5 office. And, we learn how "wildcat banks" ran wild in the earliest years of Michigan's statehood.

Stateside 4.18.2017

Apr 18, 2017

Today, Stateside launches a new regular segment called Theater Talk to spotlight Michigan's professional stage scene. And, we hear about a plan to fix Detroit's dangerous air quality.

Stateside 4.17.2017

Apr 17, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear from a Detroit man who spent three years in prison fighting to prove his innocence. And Michigan Radio's sports commentator John Bacon explains why the NHL's decision to bail on the 2018 Olympics is "dumb, dumb and dumber."

Stateside 4.14.2017

Apr 14, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear why the nuclear industry blames government for not providing a permanent way to store nuclear waste. And, a visit to Scott Smith Pipe Organs takes us into the holiday weekend.

Stateside 4.13.2017

Apr 13, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear about an event designed to train imams and other faith-based leaders to spot the first signs of mental illness. And, we get a sneak peak of the first-ever musical version of "Into the Wild," premiering in Dexter.

Stateside 4.12.2017

Apr 12, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn that the Red Wings' first outdoor game wasn't in a big stadium. It was at a prison. And, women are more stressed than men, so why do they live longer?

Stateside 4.11.2017

Apr 11, 2017

Today, Michigan lawmakers moved towards dropping the foreign language requirement to graduate from high school. Is this taking students in the wrong direction? Then, we talk with the first teacher certified to teach Anishinaabemowin. Plus, a new report finds colleges are balancing their books on the backs of part-time faculty.

Stateside 4.10.2017

Apr 10, 2017

Today, we hear from a woman who served four years in prison for child abuse she didn't commit. And, we learn how much hope Michigan's Syrian-Americans are taking from President Trump's decision to launch cruise missiles at a Syrian airbase.

Stateside 4.7.2017

Apr 7, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn what's at stake if Republicans cut regulation on concealed weapons and vaccinations. And, we're joined by creators and stars of Comedy Central's Detroiters. They explain how local favorites like fowling and Mel Farr Superstar made their way into the show.

Stateside 4.6.2017

Apr 6, 2017

Today, we learn how heirloom seeds could strengthen our food system in the face of climate change and other weather events. We also hear about the "torture, abuse and suffering" that preceded the death of a young Marine recruit from Michigan. 

Stateside 4.5.2017

Apr 5, 2017

Today on Stateside, a woman with mental illness weighs in on the future of behavioral health services in Michigan. And, we learn how researchers aim to make rocket engines more stable (which will better our chances of getting to Mars).

Stateside 4.4.2017

Apr 4, 2017

A recent dip in auto sales could lead to production cuts, but today we learn why you shouldn't panic just yet. We also hear from the Port Huron man who claims he's still the world's greatest whistler, and the first American to win Japan's biggest poetry prize.

Stateside 4.3.2017

Apr 3, 2017

Tonight, when March Madness officially ends, an anthem will play just as it has each year since 1987. On Stateside today, we hear from the Michigander who wrote the song. And, we learn how a Michigan woman's story of abuse forever changed America's view of domestic violence.

Stateside 3.31.2017

Mar 31, 2017

On today's program, Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith stops by to explain what the recent Flint water settlement means for residents. Plus, an author shares her detailed account of a Michigan community coming together to save its dunes from development. 

Stateside 3.30.2017

Mar 31, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how raising beef could be good for the environment, if done the right way. And, we discuss the backlog of immigration cases facing Detroit.

Stateside 3.29.2017

Mar 29, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear why dramatic swings in K-12 school rankings say more about the state's ranking system than about individual schools. Plus, we learn why Michigan's capital moved from Detroit to Lansing 170 years ago.

Stateside 3.28.2017

Mar 28, 2017

Today on Stateside, a new study links childhood lead exposure to lower IQ in adults across socioeconomic status. And, the mystery of Michigan's most famous UFO sighting lives on.

Stateside 3.27.2017

Mar 27, 2017

"Alternative facts" exist amidst scientific research. Today on Stateside, we learn how to figure out what's true. We also hear why local governments and school districts are wrestling with unfunded pension liabilities.

Stateside 3.24.2017

Mar 24, 2017

As funding dries up, how should the state pay for cleanup of polluted sites? We pose that question today on Stateside. And, we turn back the clock by ten years to learn how accusations of porn at the Ann Arbor Film Festival led to a fight for free speech.

Stateside 3.23.2017

Mar 23, 2017

Today on Stateside, a widow says mental health stigma killed her husband. And, we learn what's left to honor Detroit's Brown Bomber when  Joe Louis Arena is gone.

Stateside 3.22.2017

Mar 22, 2017

Today on Stateside, Detroit's safe haven for asylum seekers gets a reprieve from the federal government. Also today, an expert explains why pumping billions into infrastructure, without steady growth, is just a "Ponzi scheme."

Stateside 3.21.2017

Mar 21, 2017

Today on Stateside, a new survey finds that Michigan residents have "alarmingly" low trust in state government. And, from band kid to All-Pro lineman, former Lion Lomas Brown discusses his memoir.

Stateside 3.20.2017

Mar 20, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear about a mother's fight to improve Michigan's low vaccination rates after losing her daughter to whooping cough. And, an author describes how she freed herself from an "OCD prison." She offers advice to others trying to do the same.

Stateside 3.17.2017

Mar 17, 2017

President Donald Trump's budget chops the Sea Grant program and its aid to towns on the Great Lakes' coast. We learn what that means for Michigan. And, in our latest edition of the Artisans of Michigan series, we hear from a fabricator who designs metal sculptures with a function.

Today, we learn how President Donald Trump's budget plan would affect Michigan. Hint: there's "real consequences" for the Great Lakes, community funding and heating aid. And, Daniel Howes of The Detroit News explains why Trump's revised fuel economy review is not an "environmental apocalypse."

Stateside 3.15.2017

Mar 15, 2017

How would you feel if your boss demanded you undergo genetic testing and hand over the results? We hear about the bill that could make that a reality. And, we talk about Ford's new SUV plant in China, including whether the venture will draw fire from Donald Trump.

Stateside 3.14.2017

Mar 14, 2017

Today, we hear from two brothers, one a citizen and one an undocumented immigrant. They discuss the uncertainty they face under President Trump. And an immigration attorney explains why DACA recipients could end up as "collateral damage" without explicit protection from the president. Also today, our guests say studying for the SAT and ACT can really pay off, and there are low cost tools to help students prepare.

Stateside 3.13.2017

Mar 13, 2017

Today we hear from outgoing U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade after Friday brought an abrupt demand for her resignation. And, crying at work can be mortifying. On the show today, we teach you how to spin it. We also hear how excluding inmates from Medicaid likely costs taxpayers even more.

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