Stateside

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Today on Stateside:

  • Governor Rick Snyder explains Proposal One, the plan that would increase road funding by increasing the state’s sales tax.
  • In working towards the New International Trade Crossing Bridge, the relationship between the United States and Canada is being put to the test, as Michigan Radio’s political analyst Jack Lessenberry discusses.

  • John Truscott, who sits on the commission that governs the state Capitol Building, talks about reopening the building to the public on Saturdays.

Thetoad / Flickr

Nearly 20 years ago, in the midst of a deep budget crunch, the state decided to close the Capitol to visitors on the weekends.

But now, as of June 6, you’ll be able to again visit the state Capitol on Saturdays.

FLICKR USER U.S. EMBASSY, JAKARTA / FLICKR

The relationship between the United States and Canada has been a figurehead of sorts for international cooperation and friendship between two neighbors.

Efforts to get the New International Trade Crossing Bridge up and running, however, continues to test that international friendship.

Jack Lessenberry, Michigan Radio’s political analyst, recently wrote an opinion piece for Dome headlined, “Cross-Border Chivalry on Life Support.”

Lindsey Smith / Michigan Radio

Three weeks from now, we will know the fate of Proposal 1, the plan that would raise around $1.2 billion for road funding by increasing the state’s sales tax. It would also raise money for schools and restore the earned income tax credit for low- to moderate-income families to the 2011 level.

As part of our series Poetically SpeakingScott Beal brings us “American Spring,” his brand-new poem that explores the current tensions surrounding police violence in America.

Flickr user Robert Couse-Baker / Flickr

The landmark 2012 Clean Air Act was the nation's first action focusing on greenhouse gases, with the goal of cutting greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2025.

Margo Oge was the Environmental Protection Agency's director of the Office of Transportation Air Quality and she helped to shape the Clean Air Act.

NPS Climate Change Response on Flickr / Flickr

When we talk about climate change and what it's doing to our world, we often talk about melting ice at the polar cap and rising sea levels.

But there is something else happening as well: The permafrost is melting. And as it does, it is releasing even more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

Today on Stateside:

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder.
Photo courtesy of Governor Snyder's office

All through this current session of the state Legislature, Detroit Free Press Lansing reporter Kathy Gray has been tracking the bills that cleared the House and Senate and then were signed into law by Gov. Rick Snyder.

This legislative session 700 bills and 125 resolutions have already been introduced, according to Gray. So far Snyder has signed 16 of those.

Gray says last legislative session close to 1,500 bills were introduced and 40% ended up becoming law.

Flickr user Bridget Coila / Flickr

Some restaurants have continued a puzzling tradition when it comes to serving wine. You order a bottle and when they bring it to the table they provide you with the cork as well.

Chief wine and restaurant critic for Hour Detroit  Magazine Chris Cook says there's a long history to this tradition.

Sara Schaff

Our series "Poetically Speaking," highlighting Michigan poets, continues. 

Benjamin Landry completed his MFA in creative writing-poetry at the University of Michigan and is a research associate in creative writing at Oberlin College. His collection Particle and Wave (University of Chicago Press), was shortlisted for the 2015 Believer Poetry Award.

Today on Stateside:

  • Detroit Free Press reporter Paul Egan talks to us about the State Officers Compensation Committee and how pay raises for state officials could be in store.
  • In The Next Idea, Harsha Nahata, the daughter of immigrants who grew up in Michigan’s Indian and Pakistani community, suggests granting an “urban visa classification” to people who agree to move into areas of urban decline.
  • Radio consultant Fred Jacobs helped birth the classic rock radio station format around 30 years ago, and he’s here today to talk about it.
FLICKR USER MIKE MOZART / FLICKR

Corn flakes was the focus of a recent piece in The Atlantic by writer Rachel Smith. She looked at what’s in them, what’s not in them, and how they were invented in Battle Creek by John Harvey Kellogg and his brother Will Keith.

Nowadays, cereal sales are dropping and Wall Street observers think Kellogg's is ripe for a takeover.

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We've heard about all the progress made towards autonomous cars.

The idea is: you get in, sit back, and let the car do the driving.

However, research suggests that not everyone will be able to enjoy this new-found freedom from the wheel.

Michigan Legislature
Matthileo / Flickr

Top state officials haven’t had a pay raise since 2002, and most of them took a 10% pay cut a few years ago, as Michigan was beginning to struggle back from the recession.

Now, however, unemployment is at its lowest level in 14 years and state revenues are growing. Is this new economic situation fostering an appetite in Lansing for a pay raise?

How to welcome more immigrants to Flint, Saginaw

Apr 20, 2015
Flickr/Michigan Municipal League

The Next Idea

I am a daughter of immigrants who grew up in Michigan's Indian and Pakistani community. Most often the response people have when they hear this is to ask: “Why, with all the glamorous cities in America, would so many people from South Asia choose to come to the Midwest?”

Brenda Fitzsimmons / The Irish Times

As part of our series "Poetically Speaking" we're highlighting Michigan poets. 

Thomas Lynch is the author of five collections of poems and four books of essays.  His essays, poems and stories have appeared in The Atlantic and Granta, The New York Times and Times of London, The New Yorker, Poetry and The Paris Review and elsewhere.  

american flag and lgbt flag
Flickr user Praveen / Flickr

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments on the legality of same-sex marriage later this month, and a group of young conservatives is pushing to change the Republican Party platform on gay marriage.

It's National Poetry Month and in our month-long series "Poetically Speaking" we are delving into the form's presence in Michigan.

Here in the Midwest, Ann Arbor-based literary journal "Midwestern Gothic" is one of the best places for poets to publish their works.

Flickr user Argonne National Laboratory / Flickr

Lawmakers are still discussing how to manage the $9.4 billion in tax credits Michigan owes automakers.

The incentives started under Gov. John Engler and were mainly used during Gov. Jennifer Granholm's era. Their purpose was to keep automakers in Detroit, and Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes says this plan was largely successful.

"The problem is the bills are becoming due and you've got folks in the Legislature who are arguing about what they're going to do about it," Howes says.

There's no way around paying them, and Howes says, "The debate now is what do they do going forward and what does that do to Michigan's competitiveness."

red wings warming up before a game
Flickr user Ellen / Flickr

The Detroit Red Wings face off against the Tampa Bay Lightning tonight in Game One of the Eastern Conference First Round series. This is the 24th straight season the Wings have made it to the playoffs.

Owen Carey

As part of our series "Poetically Speaking" we're highlighting Michigan poets. 

 

Crystal Williams is a Detroit native. She is the author of four collections of poems, most recently Detroit as Barn, finalist for the National Poetry Series and Cleveland State Open Book Prize. She is the Associate Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer at Bates College. She is also a Professor of English.

 

About her poem Enlightenment Williams says:

"The poem is about resilience, acknowledging the turmoil around us and is about, ultimately, finding a more enlightened way of considering our failings, challenges, and opportunities for growth."

Today on Stateside:

  • Detroit Free Press writer John Gallagher discusses the hotel boom happening in downtown Detroit.
  • The chair Abraham Lincoln was assassinated in 150 years ago this week will be on display outside its normal exhibit for audiences to get a closer view at the Henry Ford tomorrow, and admission is free all day.
AK Press

Octavia's Brood, a science fiction anthology being launched this week in Detroit uses, the genre as a form of social activism.

The anthology's title is a nod to Octavia Butler, one of the first black female sci-fi writers to gain recognition, including a prestigious MacArthur Foundation fellowship.

Butler published 12 novels and a collection of short stories, many of which feature young, black female protagonists who constantly adapt to new conditions.

Flickr user Yoshiyuki Takahashi / Flickr

This is International Dark Sky Week, a good time to remember that Michigan is home to an International Dark Sky Park, one of only 16 in the nation. And we've got three Dark Sky Preserves.

Headlands International Dark Sky Park is located along the shore of Lake Michigan near Mackinaw City. The park is easy to find, located just a few miles off of I-75.

Flickr user Scott Beale / Flickr

Crowdfunding. The word itself wasn't even known less than a decade ago. But crowdfunding has become a powerful way to raise money.

EquityNet tells us that more than $20 billion in funding transactions will happen around the world this year. That is a 100% increase from $10 billion last year.

worn red rocking chair
Flickr user jodelli / Flickr

Abraham Lincoln was assassinated 150 years ago this week. The chair Lincoln was sitting in that fateful night at Ford's Theatre is now one of the most visited artifacts on display at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn.

And this week, you'll be able to get a better-than-usual look at the historic red chair.

The seat is usually on display in an airtight case, but for one day only, tomorrow (April 15), the chair will be on a pedestal in open air so that audiences can have a better view. The museum will be free for all guests all day so that everyone has a chance to have this rare, up-close experience.

the two abandoned hotels
Flickr user Ian Freimuth / Flickr

There's a hotel boom happening in downtown Detroit. Once-abandoned buildings are now gleaming new hotels, or will be soon. But will these plans give Detroit too many hotel rooms or not enough? And there have been lengthy discussions over the two hotels near the new Red Wings arena site just north of downtown.

FLICKR USER CLIFF1066 / FLICKR

150 years ago this night, the 16th President of the United States decided that an evening at the theater was just what he needed.

As we all know, Abraham Lincoln’s night at Ford’s Theatre in Washington ended with a bullet fired by assassin John Wilkes Booth. The bullet lodged in his brain, right behind his left ear.

Today on Stateside:

  • Elizabeth Campbell with the Human Trafficking Clinic at the University of Michigan Law School and Judge Charles Pope of Ypsilanti’s 14B District Court join us to discuss the Human Trafficking Court in Washtenaw County, the first of its kind in Michigan.
  • Barbara Rylko-Bauer discusses her new book, A Polish Doctor in the Nazi Campus, which is about her mother, Dr. Jadwiga Lenartowicz Rylko, a former Nazi prisoner who later worked as a nurse’s aide at Henry Ford Hospital.

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