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Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

Today, we visit the Michigan company overseeing a construction project at Finca Vigia, Ernest Hemingway's Cuban home. And, we hear from a program empowering girls to be the future of the STEM industry.

Today, we hear from a rapper using rhyme to challenge the stigma around mental illness, and we learn why some governments aim to use "Nudge Units" to answer the age-old question, "What's the harm?" when creating new public policies.

We learn about "Kangaroo Care" today – a skin-to-skin bonding technique for mothers and their newborn babies. Then, an author describes his redemption story after 19 years in prison for murder.

Today we discuss a challenge many parents face: how to talk to a child about racism and racially-charged news. And, we hear about the entrepreneurial spirit behind Motown's success.

Today, we hear "Separate and Unequal," a documentary on racial tensions and missed opportunities during the past five decades. 

In today's State of Opportunity special, we zoom in on neighborhood collaboration in three different communities. We explore the power neighbors have when working together to solve a problem.

Have you ever faced holiday blues? Today, we hear how best to fight the phenomenon this season. We also take a look at where mental health care reform is going in the state. Plans don't include for-profit HMOs... for now.

Our in-house linguist joins us to discuss various dictionaries' "words of the year"... many of which have political connections. We also learn how the new round of criminal indictments in connection with the Flint water crisis could test Michigan's emergency manager law.

Today the whistleblowers that drew worldwide attention to Flint just about a year ago explain how their lives have changed. And, we learn why Michigan law makes it nearly impossible for electors to defect.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below:

Today we end our series Michigan's Juvenile Lifers: Who gets a second chance? with a look at Philadelphia's approach, which differs from Michigan's. We also hear why one attorney says it's "basic decency" to give juvenile lifers a shot at parole.

Today we hear from the first, and so far only, juvenile lifer in Michigan to get a second chance. And we learn how DeVos family donations have influenced education in Michigan.

It's been a year since Flint's emergency declaration, and today we learn what's behind the ongoing tug-of-war between the state and a federal judge. And, our series continues: we discuss who should resentence juvenile lifers – a judge or a jury.

Our series Michigan's Juvenile Lifers: Who gets a second chance? continues: Today, we hear perspectives from a corrections official and a prosecuting attorney, both of whom have worked with juvenile lifer cases.

Today we kick off our series Michigan's Juvenile Lifers: Who Gets a Second Chance? And, we learn what's moving through the legislature and what's not in these final days of Michigan's lame duck session.

In today's political roundup, we hear updates from the "strange" lame-duck session. And later in the show, we learn what science says about a Michigan lab's plan to bring frozen dead bodies back to life.

Today, Jill Stein joins us on Stateside to discuss the fate of Michigan's recount effort and the future of the fight for elections everyone can trust. And, a recovering addict tells her story to help others fight opioid addiction.

We hear an election observer's take on recount laws dating back to the 1870s. And we learn how to prevent prolonged sitting (even if you have a desk job) to stave off the harm it does to the body.

Today, we hear the latest on the precincts being left out of the presidential vote recount in Michigan. And we learn about a new curve ball that could threaten federal funding for Flint.

Today, we hear about the lame duck bill that would be "Citizens United on Steroids" for our state. And attention Midwesterners: Turns out you do have an accent. 

Today we sort through the flurry of controversial lame duck bills and hear from an Arab-American comedian who believes "comedy is most needed in times of despair." We also cheers to Repeal Day with FDR's martini.

Michigan’s ballot recount is delayed until at least next week. We check in with Ingham County Clerk Barb Byrum. Plus, the iconic and once-shuttered Belle Isle Aquarium is approaching its old glory. We find out just what it's taken to bring it back.    

To find individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Jill Stein requested a recount of the presidential election in Michigan today. We discuss what that means and what comes next. And, we hear why an MS patient believes responsible adults should have the right to choose marijuana.

 

We take a look at what to expect from the lame-duck session, which begins today in the Michigan legislature, and we hear from Michigan's own Tony-award winning playwright and co-founder of theater group Five Lesbian Brothers.

 

Today we hear about a new kind of play place: one for people with autism and their families. And we learn about the evolution of camping. It seems Americans want to be close to nature… but not too close.

 

We learn a recipe for a conflict-free Thanksgiving today. We also hear a reaction to Trump's nomination, Betsy DeVos, for U.S. education secretary.

 

Today, we hear the Mexican Consul in Detroit address his post-election fears. And, we talk about a lesser-known treatment for women's chronic and intimate health issues.

On this episode of Stateside, we dig into the question of whether Michigan students have a right to literacy, and what a re-write of the North American Free Trade Agreement could mean for Michigan and our biggest trading partner, Canada.  Also, a mold-breaking Michigander shares her story of making it as an advertising executive... there's a new Yelp-like app for migrant workers... an indigenous game developer talks about healing water through songs... and Michigan Radio's John U. Bacon breaks down the sporting news from this past weekend.

On Stateside today, we learn how the recent discovery of a potential dwarf planet could lead astronomers to the evasive Planet Nine. We also hear an expert's take on the possible effects to come if President-elect Trump pulls back on efforts to reduce climate change.

Today, we learn why the auto industry might find an ally in Donald Trump. And we learn why some high schools in Michigan are switching to 8-man football teams, instead of 11.

 

We discuss how the Motor City is evolving into the Mobility City – a city specializing in all things transportation. And, we sit down with the Reverend Jesse Jackson to talk about what he calls the "struggle for the soul of America."

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