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Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

Stateside 9.7.2017

Sep 7, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear about a bitter brotherly feud, and how Kellogg's Corn Flakes reimagined American breakfast. And, we learn about Detroit's "Femology," a collaborative space tailored to businesswomen.

Stateside 9.6.2017

Sep 6, 2017

As state lawmakers get back to work, we learn why auto insurance and pension reform top the Lansing agenda on today's Stateside. Also, an emphasis on STEM and skilled trades is all the rage these days--but what about the value of a liberal arts education?

Stateside 9.5.2017

Sep 5, 2017

Today on Stateside, we take a trip to Bach Elementary School in Ann Arbor to hear how students are feeling on the first day of school. Also on the show, a Michigan DREAMer says DACA changed his life "drastically," but today he faces uncertainty. And, a psychiatrist offers tips for returning college students on how to keep stress in check.

Stateside 9.1.2017

Sep 1, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear LaMarr Monson describe what it feels like to be free 21 years after a wrongful murder conviction. We also learn about an app in development to help teachers fight their own implicit bias in the classroom. And, after disappearing from Michigan, peregrine falcons are making a comeback and nesting on skyscrapers across the state.

Stateside 8.31.2017

Aug 31, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn Michigan has the highest ratio of robots to workers in the country, and what that could mean for the humans in our state. We also learn if the small town of Benzonia is ready for gluten-free buckwheat pancakes, and how rule changes and safer equipment could save football from itself.

Stateside 8.30.2017

Aug 30, 2017

Today on the show, we hear the story of how three women in Michigan found the vaccine for whooping cough. We also learn how Michigan students' 2017 test scores stack up against those in other states. And, we speak with a Battle Creek mom who chose to panhandle to raise money for her daughter's Michigan State University tuition.

Stateside 8.29.2017

Aug 29, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear from a filmmaker who wants the U.S. Census Bureau to stop classifying Arab Americans as "white." And, we learn how political consultants are getting into the "fake news" business.

Stateside 8.28.2017

Aug 28, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how Michiganders are helping with hurricane relief in Texas. We also learn about our state's history at the forefront of extremist movements. And, Michigan Radio sports commentator John U. Bacon returns to the show to bring us his first predictions for college football season.

Stateside 8.25.2017

Aug 25, 2017

Today on Stateside, an expert explains what doesn't add up about Major League Soccer's business model. And, we hear from the editor of a new neighborhood guidebook that gathers stories from voices around Detroit.

Stateside 8.24.2017

Aug 25, 2017

Fake polls are a thing, so how can you tell the difference? That answer comes today on Stateside. Also today, farmers explain why the local food movement makes it a "great time" for young people to go into agriculture. And, we learn why cyclists and swimmers will be towing a piano from Flint to Mackinac Island this weekend.

Stateside 8.23.2017

Aug 23, 2017

Today on Stateside, the mayor of Kalamazoo says donor money helps the city reach its goals after being "abandoned" by the state.  And, we learn how "shady ladies" celebrate emerging female authors in style.

Stateside 8.22.2017

Aug 22, 2017

A man who killed his gay admirer was released from prison today after 22 years. On Stateside, we revisit that story, which dominated headlines in 1995, to hear what the case means in today's world. And, we talk about John Saunders, the late ESPN broadcaster who opened up about depression and personal trauma to help others.

To find individual interviews, click here or see below: 

Stateside 8.21.2017

Aug 21, 2017

Today on Stateside, eclipse watchers react to watching the sun through their crackers, boxes, and special glasses. And we hear a columnist explain why she thinks Donald Trump and Charlottesville are symptoms of not dealing with slavery's legacy. Finally, a Trump rally organizer explains the "nonstop barrage of attacks" she's felt in the aftermath of Charlottesville. 

Stateside 8.18.2017

Aug 18, 2017

Today on Stateside, we talk about where things stand now with changes for marijuana in Michigan's future. And, we learn what it takes to buy and preserve a Great Lakes lighthouse.

Stateside 8.17.2017

Aug 17, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear how Michigan State University is tapping parking lots for renewable energy and big savings. And, while "totality" will elude Michigan during Monday's solar eclipse, we hear an expert's advice for how best to watch it.

Stateside 8.16.2017

Aug 16, 2017

It's been 30 years since Flight 255 crashed in Romulus. Today on Stateside, two reporters say that day is still impossible to forget. And, we hear why one researcher says the safety of birth control pills is not "sufficiently well established."

Stateside 8.15.2017

Aug 15, 2017

Today, we talk about what Justin Dawson's case reveals about the way our courts handle defendants who are mentally ill or developmentally disabled. And the state is refunding nearly $21 million to tens of thousands of people it wrongly accused of unemployment fraud. One advocate calls that a drop in the bucket.

Stateside 8.14.2017

Aug 14, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn why white supremacists carried the Red Wings logo in Charlottesville, and about the ideology they ascribe to. And, we hear a Flint man's story of being jailed for nearly a year before getting psychiatric help. 

Stateside 8.11.2017

Aug 11, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear from the two sides at odds over development plans for the Saugatuck Dunes. And we learn how the legacy of discriminatory housing policies in Michigan continues to shape metro areas today.

Stateside 8.10.2017

Aug 10, 2017

Today on Stateside, a health expert says it's unacceptable for the state to be behind on asbestos inspections. And we hear why one group offers black women a safe place to grieve, away from the pressure to always be strong. We also learn why Michigan needs more foster parents, and which waterfall in Michigan is the tallest.

Stateside 8.9.2017

Aug 9, 2017

Are classroom troublemakers a disruption or a warning sign? We discuss that question today on Stateside. We also hear about the time NASA gave Michigan a piece of the moon and it wound up in the governor's garage. And, we break down a recent case of "river rage" on the St. Clair River.

Stateside 8.8.2017

Aug 8, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear an official from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources explain which kinds of Asian carp threaten the Great Lakes and what a long-anticipated U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' report means for the fight against the voracious invaders. And, we hear Secretary of State Ruth Johnson explain why new voting machines used for elections in 11 counties today are "better in so many ways."

Stateside 8.7.2017

Aug 7, 2017

Today on Stateside, we learn why incompetence, not fraud, is the likely cause of election irregularities in Michigan. And, we break down what you need to know about perfluorinated chemicals, aka PFCs. We also take a trip to Detroit's new public cricket field, the first one that's opened in the city since the 1970s. 

Stateside 8.4.2017

Aug 4, 2017

Today on Stateside, we get an update on the toxic algal blooms on Lake Erie, the same kind that shut down Toledo's water system three years ago. And a new report indicates that past Michigan legislatures have committed the state to an ever-shrinking general fund. We talk with Ken Sikkema, former Republican legislative leader and senior policy fellow at Public Sector Consultants, and former Democratic legislator Vicki Barnett about that.

Aubrey Pollard about a year before his death.
Courtesy Thelma Pollard Gardner / via Bridge Magazine

This Friday, the movie simply titled “Detroit” debuts nationwide.

It depicts the most notorious single incident of the 1967 Detroit rebellion — the brutal police killings of three black teens at the Algiers Motel.

The still-contested events of that night at the Algiers Motel have already been written about extensively. A surviving witness called it “a night of horror and murder” worse than anything he had experienced as a soldier in Vietnam.

But after multiple trials, none of the officers involved were ever convicted of any crime.


Stateside 8.3.2017

Aug 3, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear from the family and lawyer of Raheel Siddiqui, a Muslim-American Marine recruit who died after just 11 days of boot camp on Parris Island. His family and lawyer insist Raheel's death was "not caused by any misconduct of his own." And, we hear an update on Michigan's juvenile lifers – inmates who were sentenced to life without parole when they were juveniles. Are they getting the shot at a second chance that the U.S. Supreme Court said they should?

Stateside 8.2.2017

Aug 2, 2017

Today on Stateside, a Michigan health insurer says premiums will rise sharply if the White House pulls cost-sharing subsidies. And, we learn about Michigan's historic Goose Lake – a music festival that was once hailed as "Michigan's Woodstock." 

Stateside 8.1.2017

Aug 1, 2017

Today on Stateside, a guest cautions others about the power of rip currents after almost drowning in Lake Michigan. And, a teacher describes her quest to help a promising student in the classroom, and later in his prison cell.

Stateside 7.31.2017

Jul 31, 2017

Today, we hear about the new breast pump that allows moms to "keep on keepin' on" at work, in the car, or while cooking. And, usually people are "called out" for mental illness. We hear from two Michigan poets taking a national tour to "call people in."

Stateside 7.28.2017

Jul 28, 2017

Today on Stateside, we hear why the James & Grace Lee Boggs School doesn't shy away from teaching kids about the 1967 rebellion in Detroit. And, we learn why one scientist says academics shouldn't be afraid to "get political." 

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