Stateside

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  Today on Stateside:

  • Lt. Governor Brian Calley discusses the Snyder administration's proposed budget, and what's in store for education and transportation.
  • Jeff DeGraff, clinical professor of Management and Organizations at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, discusses why technology is not the cure-all for Michigan schools for The Next Idea.
  • Emily St. John Mandel joins us in-studio to talk about her novel Station Eleven, set in post-apocalyptic Northern Michigan. The book has just been selected as the 2015-16 Great Michigan Read.
Courtesy of City of Detroit, Mayor's Office

Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan delivered his State of the City address this week.

Detroit News columnist Daniel Howes says Duggan didn't talk much about the auto industry, but instead focused on entrepreneurship and how to support small businesses.

This reflects much of Detroit, and Michigan's deeper history, according to Howes.

"Both Detroit and Michigan's roots were planted by entrepreneurs and really the Michigan that a lot of people knew and think back on, the golden age if you will, was the fruit of the entrepreneurial spirit," says Howes.

author reading from her book in studio
Michigan Radio

One title, one state and thousands of readers getting caught up in literary discussion. That's the Great Michigan Read, a biennial program of the Michigan Humanities Council.

The 2015-16 winning book is Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel.

It was a 2014 National Book Award Finalist along with being named one of the Top Ten Books of the Year by the Washington Post, Time Magazine and Amazon. Michigan Radio program director Tamar Charney reviewed it earlier this year.

Flickr/Brian Flickinger

The Next Idea

Technological innovation alone doesn’t improve education. We often assume that the latest gadgets and software will change everything — that they will make things easier and better and solve larger problems. The truth is that technology is just one aspect in a larger web of cultural issues, and new breakthroughs by themselves will not have a broad effect on overall learning.

Michigan Radio

It’s estimated that in the United States some 22 veterans commit suicide every day.

“It is a tragedy, one that we have to deal with,” Michigan Democratic Senator Gary Peters said. “In my mind we have a sacred obligation to take care of those who have served us overseas, so we need to address it immediately.”

Today on Stateside:

·        In the U.S., it’s estimated that some 22 veterans commit suicide every day. U.S. Sen. Gary Peters, D-Michigan, is co-sponsoring legislation to try and improve mental health care for veterans. Peters joined us to discuss the issue.

·        Charles Eisendrath, the director of the national journalism program Knight-Wallace Fellows at the University of Michigan talks about the controversy surrounding NBC News Anchor Brian Williams.

How do you get in a good relationship and stay in it? You could say, that is one of life's $64,000 questions!

And, it is a central question driving the characters in a collection of short stories by West Michigan author Lisa Lenzo. 

The book is Strange Love. The stories take us through the lives of Annie Zito, a divorced mom and her daughter Marly. The book was also on the 2015 list of Michigan Notable Books.

There was a time when you'd see plenty of cars with Ontario plates parked at shopping centers and stores in Southeast Michigan.

That's because the Canadian dollar was so strong against the American dollar.

Rebecca Kruth

All this week on Stateside, in our series Living with Death, we're talking to people about how the process of death and dying has changed. Today: what's it really like to be a small-town mortician?

When Stateside's Rebecca Kruth lost her father, her family turned to Larry Skinner, the Eaton Rapids funeral director who's been helping the community say its goodbyes for years. 

As part of our Living with Death series, Kruth talked to Skinner about what it's like planning funerals in a town where everyone knows everyone.

FLICKR FRANK KOVALCHEK/FLICKR

Frida Waara takes on Marquette winters with gusto. She spoke with Stateside host Cyndy Canty about the “fantastic” season and the UP 200 Dog Sledding Championship event it brings.

On Feb. 12-16, mushers will race a total of 240 miles, from Marquette to Grand Marais and back. Waara has done it before and says the race brings all sorts of people to compete.

Today on Stateside:

taxcredits.net

Governor Snyder is set to deliver his budget proposal for the next fiscal year tomorrow morning in Lansing. The just released Michigan Radio/Public Sector Consultants poll takes a look at where the voters of Michigan would like to see the state invest.

media.ford.com

When you hear the term "midlife crisis" most people imagine a fifty-something guy driving off in a new sports car, but it turns out women are casting their eyes on midlife crisis cars too.

A new survey from CarMax decided to determine just what a midlife crisis car actually is. Publisher of thedetroitbureau.com Paul Eisenstein says the survey found a little less than a third of people give into these urges and purchase the car of their dreams.

Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

Opponents of charter schools are failing to make effective arguments for their position against them, while proponents are creating a stronger consensus for them finds a study conducted by Michigan State University professors Sarah Reckhow and Matt Grossman, along with University of Rochester PhD student Benjamin Evans.

Michelle Chamuel's latest album, "Face the Fire," is out today. Chamuel was previously the lead singer of Michigan-based band Ella Riot, and more recently Chamuel gained fame as runner-up on season four of "The Voice."

David Ohmer / Flickr

All this week on Stateside, in our series Living with Death, we're talking to people about how the process of death and dying has changed. Today: do you have any control of your social media presence once you're gone? 

It's safe to say that many of us live much of our lives online.

Where Grandma may have had precious old letters tucked into a trunk, we have emails stored on servers or in the Cloud. Where Mom had her photo albums or boxes stuffed with priceless photos, we've got ours on Flickr.

What happens to all of that when we die?

To find out, we talked to Michigan Radio's social media producer Kimberly Springer. She explains the price of not planning ahead to the day we are gone and the etiquette of handling deaths on social media.

Today on Stateside:

  • Governor Snyder will present his recommended budget for 2015-2016 on Wednesday morning and Detroit Free Press Lansing reporter Paul Egan joins us to discuss.
  •   Third grade teacher from Keith Elementary in Walled Lake speaks about her first book: Diary of a Real Bully.
FLICKr USER ATTRAZIONE MOTORI / FLICKR

Those high-tech electronic systems that ideally improve safety could turn around to bite us.

A recently released report by U.S. Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., found that millions of cars and trucks are dangerously vulnerable to hacking.

The Michigan Department of Education has called it the most serious federal criminal case involving a Michigan charter school since the state gave the green light to charter schools in 1994.

Traverse City optometrist Steven Ingersoll will go on trial tomorrow on seven criminal charges of bank fraud and tax evasion.

Education reporter Chastity Pratt Dawsey wrote an article for Bridge Magazine that explored the charges.

michigan.gov

Governor Snyder will present his recommended budget for 2015-2016 on Wednesday morning.

Detroit Free Press Lansing reporter Paul Egan wrote an article about the anticipated budget.

The state's general fund, he said, is like the state’s “checking account.” For the current 2015 fiscal year, the state has a $325 million deficit. For the 2016 fiscal year – the year for which Snyder will present his recommended budget on Wednesday – a $532 million deficit is expected.

www.melodyarabo.com

Last spring’s Michigan Teacher of the Year, Melody Arabo, joined us today to talk about her first book, A Diary of a Real Bully.

Arabo’s book stems from her third grade classroom at Keith Elementary School in Walled Lake. There, she witnessed bullying and was shocked to find out which kids unveiled themselves as the bullies.

Courtesy of GM

The Next Idea

It can often be difficult to imagine just how much the latest innovations will truly affect our lives. The smartphone’s contributions, for example, are now obvious; the Segway’s, not so much.

One industry, however, that offers some of the clearest examples of how technology and new innovations will fundamentally change our world is the auto industry.

From driverless cars and 3-D printers, to shifting demographic and transportation trends, automakers are competing to find the best, most efficient innovations that will reshape everything from the way we buy (or share) cars to how we drive (or won’t) in the coming decades.

Kathlene Rodgers

 

All this week on Stateside, in our series Living with Death, we're talking to people about how the process of death and dying has changed.

Today we talk about what changes the mortuary science field has experienced.

We know it’s inevitable, but death is not something that all people come to embrace. For those working in the profession of mortuary sciences, it is a fact of daily life.

Wikimedia Commons

February 7th marks the 130th birthday of the American writer Sinclair Lewis, whose 1925 Pulitzer-prize winning novel Arrowsmith was the first novel to focus on the life of a medical scientist.

University of Michigan physician and medical historian Dr. Howard Markel says it's a wonderful historical analysis of everything that is great and problematic with American medicine.

Today on Stateside:

  • Sen. Stabenow discusses the one-year anniversary of the U.S. Farm Bill and what can be expected with the New International Trade Crossing between Michigan and Canada.
  •  Counties and townships in Michigan don't have the authority to regulate oil and gas drilling. We talk with Keith Matheny from the Detroit Free Press about how those governments are trying the use the tools they do have.
  • Lynn Fairchild talks to us about the federal program Experience Works that helps people 55 and older find jobs.
Sarah Hulett / Michigan Radio

It has become crystal clear: Michigan's budget will have some mighty big holes this year and into the future. That's because billions of dollars of state tax credits awarded largely to Detroit's three automakers are coming due. The credits were aimed at keeping plants and jobs in Michigan during the Great Recession.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes believes before we get caught up in finger-pointing, grandstanding and wailing, a history lesson is in order.

Flickr user Mike Fischer / Flickr

As the years roll on and you move through middle age into senior citizen status, it can feel as though the world is racing past you, leaving you in its dust. Especially when it comes to finding a job.

Yet more and more people aged 55 and up are in the job hunt. The government tells us in 1992, workers 55 and older made up just under 12% of the work force. By 2022, it could be more than 25%.

Standards and efficiency stifle innovation

Feb 5, 2015
BILL PUGLIANO GETTY IMAGES

The Next Idea

Most descriptions of innovation end up in overreaching hyperbole: groundbreaking, disruptive, radical. This shouldn’t surprise anyone because innovation is basically a type of positive deviance, a form of useful novelty. What separates a new soft drink that has a hint of cherry flavor from a vaccine that prevents the onset of Alzheimer’s Disease is the magnitude and speed at which it deviates from the norm. 

field of hay with red barn
Flickr user Julie Falk / Flickr

This Saturday marks the one-year anniversary of President Obama's trip to Michigan State University where he signed the massive, almost $1 trillion U.S. Farm Bill into law.

Michigan Oil and Gas Association

Michigan's zoning law bars counties and townships from regulating the drilling and operation of oil and gas wells, meaning oil can be drilled as close as 450 feet from your property line without prior notification.

Detroit Free Press reporter Keith Matheny talked to homeowners living next to an oil well in their neighborhood who were given no forewarning of its construction.

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