Stateside

Here you'll find the full program for Michigan Radio's Stateside. To find the individual segments and posts, go here.

Labels on nutrition labels will look a lot different over the next two years
U.S. Department of Agriculture / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

The Food and Drug Administration is changing the design of the nutritional labels on the food you buy. To give us an idea of what changes, why the changes, and when we’ll see the changes is Laura Bix, a Packaging professor at Michigan State University

Among the changes, the new design is expected to make calorie and serving sizes more prominent and easier to find. Also, serving sizes are being adjusted to be more realistic to how people typically eat.

David Stanley is the author of "Melanoma: It Started with a Freckle"
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

There are few things scarier than hearing your doctor say, “You have cancer.”

David Stanley heard those words.  

He was diagnosed with melanoma. What did he do? He survived, and wrote a book to share the experience and serve as a warning. 

Gov. Rick Snyder at the 2016 Mackinac Policy Conference
Zoe Clark / Michigan Radio

Zoe Clark from It's Just Politics is at the Mackinac Policy Conference and there's been no shortage of news at what many would consider to be the Super Bowl for political junkies. Clark joined Stateside to discuss what hasn't been discussed that much over the last few days:  The city of Flint and the water crisis that continues there.

Governor Snyder at the Mackinac Policy Conference in 2014
flickr user A Healthier Michigan / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

The Detroit Regional Chamber's Mackinac Policy Conference wrapped up this morning. There was a lot of buzz up on Mackinac Island about an EPIC-MRA poll which finds Governor Snyder's disapproval rating is 52%.

Lester Graham / Michigan Radio

  

Love Interruption by Liz Cosby, beverage director, Rock City Eatery

2-3 sprigs thyme

1/2 oz simple syrup

1-1/2 oz White Blossom Vodka (this is an infused vodka; other vodkas will change the taste)

1/2 oz Cointreau

2 oz grapefruit juice

Muddle two sprigs of thyme with simple syrup. Add remaining ingredients to shaker with ice. Shake, strain into ice-filled highball glass. Garnish with remaining thyme.

Ian Hartley
Courtesy of Julie Hartley

"Minding Michigan" is Stateside's ongoing series that examines mental health issues in our state. 

nearly one in every five DPS students  qualifies for some special education services
Mercedes Mejia / Michigan Radio

The fight continues over a bailout package for Detroit Public Schools.

Today, the state House is attempting to hash out the differences between its rescue plan and the bipartisan plan passed by the state Senate.

At the heart of the fight is an amended Senate proposal for a Detroit Education Commission, a body that would set the same standards for closing down both failing public schools and charter schools in Detroit.

Clark Durant is co-founder of Cornerstone Schools, which runs charter schools in Detroit.

Courtesy of Tony Reidsma

Lake Michigan residents and business owners are expressing concern over rising water levels. Just three years ago, however, the concern was about record low water levels in the Great Lakes.

Al Steinman, president of the Annis Water Resources Institute at Grand Valley State University, told Stateside that there’s no need to worry about such a significant fluctuation in lake levels.

“People need to be patient,” Steinman said. “These water levels go up and down. It’s part of the natural cycle.”

Mercedes Mejia/Michigan Radio

Sue Schooner has never taken a social work class, nor has she ever had children. But that didn’t stop her from creating and leading Girls Group, an organization that empowers young women to complete high school and be the first college graduate in their families.

The creation of Girls Group led to a change of heart for Schnooner.

Flickr user Newman University/Flickr

The Next Idea

Hundreds of leaders have descended upon Mackinac Island for the Mackinac Policy Conference this week. Their aim is to explore solutions to Michigan’s problems, and education across the state has been a big talking point.

One of those leaders is Doug Rothwell, CEO of Business Leaders for Michigan.

Zoe Clark / Michigan Radio

In day two of the Mackinac Policy Conference, Governor Rick Snyder seems to be in full "RPA mode." That's "relentless positive action."

 

“You get a sense among folks here that the Governor is somewhat weakened and trying to find his way back,” said Detroit News Business Columnist Daniel Howes, who is at the conference.

Richard T. James

The Tony Award for Excellence in Theatre Education was awarded to Detroit teacher Marilyn McCormick. She was picked out of 1,100 candidates who were nominated by people across the country. McCormick will be recognized during the live Tony Award broadcast on June 12. In addition, the Cass Technical performing arts program will receive a $10,000 grant.

 

Flickr user healthiermi/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Over 1,500 politicians, philanthropists, entrepreneurs and business people are at the Grand Hotel for this year's Mackinac Policy Conference. There will be three days of events and speakers, including Gov. Rick Snyder and Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan.

 

Our It’s Just Politics team, Zoe Clark and Rick Pluta, describes the event as a "melting pot" of Michigan leaders.

What happened to Midwestern history?

Jun 1, 2016
A map of Michigan and Wisconsin
FLICKER USER NORMAN B. LEVENTHAL MAP CENTER/FLICKR / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

What happened to Midwestern history?

 

In places like the West, New England and the South, universities and professors are dedicated to studying regional histories. But in the Midwest, not so much.

 

Jon Lauck, a history professor and author of “The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History,” says the field of Midwestern history used to be robust. Yet, after World War II, the field declined to the point where there was no academic journal or association dedicated to it.

Lauck is also president of the Midwestern History Association. The organization is holding its second annual Midwestern History Association conference June, 1 at the Hauenstein Center at Grand Valley State University.

A referee at a football game.
Flickr user Brandon Giesbrecht/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Verbal and physical assaults on referees have become an issue so serious that Michigan may be joining 20 other states in specific legislation that protects sports officials.

Mark Uyl is the assistant director for the Michigan High School Athletic Association (MHSAA). He believes some of the greatest concerns for referee safety comes from recreational and youth-level programs, where volunteer coaches lack accountability.

The Accidentals are Katie Larson, Michael Dause and Savannah Buist
Tony Demin

The Accidentals have been busy since last we spoke in 2013.

All told, the young musicians performed a whopping 230 shows across the country after graduating high school last year.
 

The dynamic Traverse City trio was named one of Billboard Magazine's top seven breakout acts of South by Southwest in 2015.

And now, they've just released their newest EP, Parking Lot.

kid walking up stairs flanked by 2 adults
flickr user Kat Grigg / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

When you're a parent, you just want to do what's best for your kids.

But with so much parenting advice floating around, it can be tough to figure out what exactly "best" means. 
 

According to Heather Shumaker, sometimes doing right by your kids means taking all that conventional wisdom and flipping it on its head.

Decaying sea walls on Lake Michigan in Chicago.
Flickr user Mike Boehmer/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Water levels in Lake Michigan and Lake Huron were at record lows three years ago. At the same time, water levels for the other Great Lakes were well below average.

This year is a bit different. Lake Michigan could be at a near-record high. The lake has risen four feet since that all-time low in January 2013.

Kathleen Torrenson is the president of Torreson Marine in Muskegon. She joined us today on Stateside to discuss how the changing water levels have affected her business and others located along the shoreline.

Torreson said these new high water levels are good for the boating business in the Great Lakes.

“It allows our customers and the people using the water a lot more flexibility in where they’re going and what they’re using,” she said.

But it’s not all good news.

“On the other side of the coin, high water tends to be really, really tough on fixed objects, like sea walls and fixed docks and things like that, things that were built when water levels were at other depths,” Torrenson said. “And as the water comes up and up, they become more prone to damage and erosion, kind of like what they’ve been seeing along the beaches.”

Torrenson said another effect of the sea level rise is that there’s “a lot less beach” compared to a couple years ago. Another flip side, however, is businesses like hers have had to do far less dredging to keep the lake deep enough for boats coming in near the shore.

train tracks
Flickr user John Jarvis/Flickr / HTTP://MICHRAD.IO/1LXRDJM

A 20-year master plan for regional transit in Metro Detroit was unveiled today, after the Regional Transit Authority of Southeast Michigan spent over a year gathering input on the plan.

 

The goal is to help fix metro Detroit’s fractured transit systems and pull them together under the umbrella of a $4.6 billion plan to connect Detroit with Wayne, Oakland, Macomb and Washtenaw counties.

 

Cass Community Social Services of Detroit

Soon, tiny houses will start popping up in Detroit. Construction on the first house is slated to begin within two weeks. The goal is to provide homes for some of the city’s homeless, senior citizens and students who have aged out of foster care.

Courtesy of Micheline Maynard/Forbes Media

Two-thirds of all restaurants will fail within three years of first opening their doors, a statistic that could be attributed to an owner’s desire for expansion only after a few months of profits.

“Hometown Holdouts” is a new e-book that breaks down the success of businesses that chose to stay local, despite nationwide recognition. Author Micheline Maynard says "hometown holdouts" benefit their communities, and resist the pressure to expand.

The chamber in Michigan's State Capitol.
CedarBendDrive/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

When creating new public policies, lawmakers seek to answer the age-old question: “What’s the harm?”

Some governments are aiming to answer that question with “Nudge Units” that gather insight on public behavior before implementing new policies, ideally avoiding future disasters like the Flint water crisis.

Jodi Westrick / Michigan Radio

Warm weather is here across Michigan, and with it brings fresh food out of our gardens. One of those delicious, fresh dishes you can make is morel mushroom conserva. The Stateside Test Kitchen was lucky enough to have Chef James Rigato come into the studio to share his recipe.

a golf ball and club
flickr user Krzysztof Urbanowicz / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

Market forces have decided that Michigan has too many golf courses.

An article in the Detroit Free Press last month looked at the boom of golf courses in recent decades turning into "a painful bust," as the headline reads.  

Jeff Manion speaking about his first book, "The Land Between," at the Willow Leitungskongress 2012
flickr user Willow Creek DC/H / http://j.mp/1SPGCl0

We all fail sometimes. No exceptions.

It's often hard to admit, but failure is an essential part of the human experience. 

That's what Failure:Lab is all about.

Courtesty: Andrew Herscher

Detroit is getting some love in Venice.

The Venice Architecture Biennale is a really big deal in the architecture world, and the designs presented by this year's American exhibitors are all about the Motor City. 

Asian Carp
Kate Gardiner / Flickr - http://bit.ly/1rFrzRK

For nearly two decades, The Environment Report and its predecessor The Great Lakes Radio Consortium have been reporting about invasive species on Michigan Radio. More and more kinds of pests are being introduced into the lakes, often by cargo ships bringing in critters from foreign ports. And it's a lot more than just Asian Carp, which has received plenty of headlines in recent years. 

Flickr user kattebelletje/Flickr / HTTP://J.MP/1SPGCL0

Drinking lead-tainted water is out of the question, as is cooking with it and bathing in it. But what about gardening? Is it safe to water your garden with leaded water through a hose without a filter?

FLICKR USER JASON MRACHINA / https://flic.kr/p/bUmnTg

David Maraniss’ earliest memories are in Detroit. He's the associate editor of the Washington Post. Maraniss lived in Detroit until he was six years old and remembers the strong taste of Vernor's. He remembers the Boblo boat.

His book Once in a Great City: A Detroit Story tells us what Detroit gave America. It also details the first signs of the city's troubles. Maraniss joined us on Stateside to talk about his strong feelings for the state and about the country’s view of Detroit.  

FLICKR USER CHRISTIAN JUNKER/ FLICKR / https://flic.kr/p/9S6x3L

The Detroit Metropolitan Airport has come a long way. The airport used to be less put together, but in 2002 it took off. Delta opened the McNamara Terminal that year. Then, in 2008, the North Terminal opened.

A 2014 study by the University of Michigan Dearborn found that DTW generated $10.2 billion in economic impact and 86,000 statewide jobs.

Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes joined us today on Stateside to talk about the airport and its impact. He recently had a sit-down conversation with Delta CEO Ed Bastian.

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