Stateside

Stateside
3:45 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Has Michigan stopped the hemorrhage of folks packing up and moving out?

corriganmoving.com

A recently released migration study from United Van Lines finds that people aren't leaving Michigan in droves anymore.

For the past 37 years, United Van Lines has tracked who's moving where among the 50 states  to see which states are in demand, which are stable and which are the ones people want to leave.

And for the first time in 16 years, this migration study contains good news for Michigan.

We spoke with Corrigan Moving Systems agent Dave Corrigan.

Listen to the full interview above.

Sports
2:12 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Michigan figure skaters set world record at Sochi

Meryl Davis and Charlie White - World Champions 2013
Ludwig Welnicki en.wikipedia.org

One of the most compelling Michigan stories to emerge from the Sochi Winter Olympics has been in the ice dancing competition. Fifteen of the 24 teams train at three Metro Detroit facilities, including Arctic Edge in Canton.

Sunday's short program left two teams at the head of the pack: Canada's Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, and Charlie Davis and Meryl White for Team USA. Both pairs train at Arctic Edge, and both share the same coach.

Today, the two teams competed for gold, and...

<<< SPOILER  ALERT: DON'T CLICK THROUGH if you don't want to know what happened today in Sochi>>>

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Politics & Culture
4:53 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Stateside for Thursday, Feb.13, 2014

When it comes to support for emergency care services, the U.S. just barely squeaked by with a passing grade, at least according to a new state-by-state report card put out by the American College of Emergency Physicians.

And how did Michigan measure up, you might ask? Well, it turns out we're failing in access to emergency health care. We heard some recommendations about ways to move forward.

Then, we met a woman who’s trying to help people come together to have some uncomfortable, but enlightening, conversations about race, class and more.

And, we spoke with Daniel Howes about Tom Lewand, Detroit’s job czar.

Also, “Saturday Night Live” just hired its first black female cast member in five years. Will this bring more attention to other black comedians?

And, a Michigan historian gave us a closer look at how Michigan milkweed helped us in World War II.

Also, the Michigan Human Society has a new way to find homes for their animals: social media.

First on the show, how do you best measure the progress of students in Michigan's classrooms and, by extension, the effectiveness of their teachers?

It's one of the thorniest challenges being debated in Michigan education.

For years, the Michigan Education Assessment Program (MEAP) and the Michigan Merit Examination (MME) have been the assessment tools. Now, with the move to the Common Core Standards, it's out with the MEAP and MME and in with the what?

Districts around Michigan are gearing up for an online adaptive assessment test in the spring of 2015.

The Michigan Department of Education says the state has only one option for testing students on the Common Core State Standards for the next three years.

And that option is the Smarter Balanced Assessment – the SBA.

But state lawmakers haven't made that official.

We wondered how districts  are preparing for the SBA or whatever test they're told to administer next year.

William Heath is the superintendent of the Morrice Area Schools and principal at Morrice Junior and Senior High School located in Shiawassee County. He joined us today.

Stateside
4:53 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

According to a new report, Michigan is failing in access to emergency care

Is a health care emergency coming in 2014?
(photo by Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio)

How are we doing as a state and as a nation, when it comes to our emergency rooms and access to emergency health care?

According to a report card recently released by the American College of Emergency Physicians, not very well. Michigan received a grade of "D" in access to emergency care.

Why are we failing in access to this life-or-death care in Michigan?

Dr. Michael Nauss is a senior emergency room physician at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. And he's a board member of the Michigan College of Emergency Physicians. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:53 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Deep Dive Detroit helps start conversations about social justice

Lester Graham Michigan Radio

What discussions and conversations should we be having around Michigan that we are veering away from?

What's the price we're paying for not opening up and talking about hot-button issues like racism, poverty, food justice, LGBT rights, and so much more?

That's what our next guest asked herself, and that led her to co-found Deep Dive Detroit. Its mission is to "create a safe place for uncomfortable conversations between disparate groups."

Co-founder Lauren Hood joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:53 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Michigan Humane Society uses social media to place animals in homes

Jennifer Waters Creative Commons

This is worth taking a look at as Facebook marks its 10th birthday. Social media is being used by the Michigan Humane Society to find homes for its orphaned animals.

Kelly Stork is the social media specialist for the Michigan Humane Society, and she joined us today to tell us more about it.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:53 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Black female comedians are receiving more attention

Satori Shakoor
Twitter

A new face recently joined the cast of "Saturday Night Live" and made plenty of headlines when she did.

Comic Sasheer Zamata became the first black female cast member of SNL in five years, since the departure of Maya Rudolph. She was discovered through a talent search that focused strictly on black female comedians.

What does this extra attention mean for other black women who want to make us laugh?

One of those women is Detroiter Satori Shakoor, actor, writer, comedian and creator of "The Secret Society of Twisted Storytellers." She joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:52 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Michigan milkweed played a key role in WWII

Milkweed
Flickr user keithcarver Flickr

Think about World War II and the ways Michigan helped the war effort: The Arsenal of Democracy, Rosie the Riveter, heavy bombers rolling off the assembly line at Willow Run.

And milkweed.

Yes, the common weed found in the northwest Lower Peninsula went to war.

Gerry Wykes is a historian and freelance author/illustrator who recently wrote about milkweed for Mlive and Michigan History Magazine. He joined us today to explain how this weed helped in the war effort.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:52 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

Detroit's jobs czar Tom Lewand claims to have the 'best job in America'

Peter Martorano Flickr

It’s time for our Thursday check-in with Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes.

His focus today was on someone who says he's got "the best job in America." Tom Lewand is the man in the Mike Duggan administration whose mission is to find jobs for Detroiters.

Daniel Howes joined us today to tell us more about this job.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:52 pm
Thu February 13, 2014

What can we expect from the Smarter Balanced Assessment?

Michigan students may have more rigorous performance expectations on MEAP and other standardized tests.
Alberto G. / Creative Commons

How do you best measure the progress of students in Michigan's classrooms and, by extension, the effectiveness of their teachers?

It's one of the thorniest challenges being debated in Michigan education.

For years, the Michigan Education Assessment Program (MEAP) and the Michigan Merit Exam (MME) have been the assessment tools. Now, with the move to the Common Core Standards, it's out with the MEAP and MME and in with the what?

Districts around Michigan are gearing up for an online adaptive assessment test in the spring of 2015.

The Michigan Department of Education says the state has only one option for testing students on the Common Core State Standards for the next three years.

And that option is the Smarter Balanced Assessment, the SBA.

But state lawmakers haven't made that official.

We wondered how districts  are preparing for the SBA or whatever test they're told to administer next year.

William Heath is superintendent of the Morrice Area Schools and the principal at Morrice Junior and Senior High School located in Shiawassee County. He joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:05 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Are Detroit's female and minority entrepreneurs ignored?

Detroit's skyline.
Peter Martorano Flickr

There has been much talk – some of it here on this show – about opportunities for entrepreneurs in Detroit.

After more than a century of being dominated by big business – General Motors, Chrysler, Packard – the new look of business in Detroit is small, nimble, and full of innovation.

Some have raised the question whether there has been an inordinate amount of attention paid to white entrepreneurs – and male entrepreneurs.

Lisa Cook, an associate professor of economics and international relations at Michigan State University, says that many are ignoring women and ethnic minorities’ roles in Detroit’s entrepreneurial scene.

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
3:04 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Stateside for Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014

Are Detroit's pet coke piles coming back? The people who had to live near four-story piles of pet coke, and breathe in clouds of pet coke dust last year before the stuff was moved out, are now watching to see if Detroit Bulk Storage is trying to get pet coke back on the Detroit riverfront.

Dave Battagello has been tracking this story for The Windsor Star.

Also today our national anthem, The Star Spangled Banner, is turning 200 this year. Today we’ll hear about a project that’s highlighting the different versions of the song. And then, as more and more people are questioning the safety of the chemicals around us, health leaders are trying to understand the risks. We talk about a new statewide program that aims to train health professionals about environmental health risks and activism.

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Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

January snowfall broke records in some parts of the state

Outdoor Power Equipment Institute

If you ask just about anyone in Michigan about the weather this winter, chances are he or she will swear there has never been this much snow.

Well, yes and no. Some cities shattered their snowfall records in January, but in some parts of the state, January snowfall was pretty much business as usual.

Let's see who has legit bragging rights when it comes to snowfall.

MLive meteorologist Mark Torregrossa, who also runs the site farmerweather.com, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

How has NAFTA affected the auto industry in Michigan?

White House

We've been exploring the effects of NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, recently. NAFTA is 20 years old this year and has had dramatic effects on the state and U.S. economy.

What has NAFTA meant to the auto industry, in particular, the movement of companies and jobs to Mexico – companies and jobs that used to be based in Michigan?

We turned to Stateside's partners at the BBC for more information. BBC correspondent Luis Fajardo joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:17 pm
Tue February 11, 2014

University programs send students to Detroit communities

Detroit Skyline
JSFauxtaugraphy/Flickr

Getting college students out of their classrooms, out of the "academic bubble" and into communities, giving eager students an opportunity to take what they're learning and put it into practice, and, at the same time, hopefully help their communities certainly seem like a win-win for all sides.

And that's why students from Wayne State University and the University of Michigan are permeating the city of Detroit in many ways, through many programs.

We wanted to see what's been learned by all sides in these partnerships.

Jerry Herron, founding dean of the Honors College at Wayne State and UM professor Larry Gant joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
4:29 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Ann Arbor-based non-profit is dedicated to building links between homeless, 'homeful'

State law bans "begging in a public place."
Annie Green Springs Flickr

It's called "Mission A2" – short for Michigan Itinerant Shelter System Interdependent  Out of Necessity. This Ann Arbor-based nonprofit is dedicated to building links between homeless and what it calls "homeful" Washtenaw County residents. One of its key activities has been running a series of rotating tent cities for the homeless.

But now, Mission A2 is taking things to a new level. They're partnering to buy land and build a permanent settlement called Homeward Bound, a place for Ann Arbor's homeless to begin the process of rebuilding confidence and their lives.

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Stateside
4:22 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Michigan still hasn't figured out how to get marijuana into the hands of registered patients

Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette says opportunists have hijacked the state's medical marijuana industry.
kconnors MorgueFile

Medical marijuana is legal in Michigan. Voters overwhelmingly said "yes" to that in 2008.

But more than five years later, our state still hasn't figured out how best to get the cannabis into the hands of the more than 100,000 people who are registered as medical marijuana users.

In Mid-December, two bills were passed by the State House that made it easier for patients to buy medicinal cannabis. House Bill 5104 would permit manufacture and sale of non-smoking forms of medical marijuana – capsules, oil, brownies – which would help patients who have a hard time smoking the weed.

Read more
Stateside
4:21 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Proposals could impact students in every third-grade classroom in Michigan

3rd Grade Class
User: Old Shoe Woman Flickr

There is a two-bill package making its way through the state Legislature that could impact students in every third-grade classroom in Michigan.

It would hold back third-graders who have poor reading skills. If a child fails a third-grade reading exam, he or she does not move along to fourth grade.

Backers say it can help get a struggling student back on track. Critics say flunking that struggling student is a punishment. State Superintendent Mike Flanagan panned the legislation, saying it should be up to local schools and parents.

Amber Arellano is the executive director of the Education Trust-Midwest.

Stateside
4:20 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Belle Isle becomes Michigan's 102nd state park

Belle Isle's Scott Fountain.
demccain flickrriver

A new chapter has begun in the long history of Detroit's Belle Isle, which is transitioning to become Michigan's 102nd state park. 

The full change takes place today, as state park officials assume control of the park under the lease imposed by Detroit's emergency manager, Kevyn Orr. The move should save the city between $4 and $5 million a year. 

Starting today, motorists will need an $11 state recreation passport to enter the park. 

Detroit Free Press editorial editor Stephen Henderson joins us today to talk about what we can expect for the future of Belle Isle and the city of Detroit. 

Listen to the full interview above. 

Stateside
4:20 pm
Mon February 10, 2014

Is Australia's car manufacturing industry about to reach the end of the road?

GM and Chrysler suffered through bankruptcy in large part because it relied so heavily on SUV sales.
user ep_jhu Creative Commons

Ford and General Motors both recently decided to stop producing cars in Australia. Now, that country's car manufacturing industry is about to reach the end of the road. That's after today's announcement that Toyota will close its operations there as well.

Stateside's partner the BBC has more from business correspondent Russell Padmore.

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