Stateside

this is the correct one

FLICKR USER CLOTEE PRIDGEN ALLOCHUKU / FLICKR

It looks like some lawmakers who aren't happy with the May ballot proposal to increase road funding are trying to come up with an alternative.

Flickr user ashleystreet / Flickr

This month, the Detroit Institute of Arts will unveil a major exhibition focusing on two of the most fascinating and influential artists of the 20th century.

chicago skyline from lake michigan with wake
Flickr user get directly down / Flickr

This year marks the 17th season of The Great Lakes Cruise Company, and three new cruises between Chicago and Montreal, along with a new ship, the Saint Laurent, will be introduced this year.

Joe Gratz / Flickr

The Michigan attorney general’s office has decided to withdraw subpoenas sent to reporters investigating prison conditions for teenaged inmates.The attorney general’s office asked for all notes and records dealing with interviews connected to a lawsuit alleging sexual assaults against teenaged state prison inmates.   

Today on Stateside:

  • General Counsel for the Michigan Press Association Robin Herman explains why the subpoenas served against the press yesterday were so surprising.
  • Ann Arbor filmmaker Toko Shiiki discusses her film Threshold: Whispers of Fukushima, and why some residents decided to stay in the community after the nuclear accident four years ago.
  • Owner of Source Booksellers in Detroit, Janet Jones, talks to us about why she believes independent bookstores are on the rise.
  • Hour Magazine chief wine and restaurant critic discusses screw cap wines.
  • Executive director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights, Matt Wesaw, tells us what Michigan is doing to foster better relationships between police officers and citizens.
  • This year marks the 17th season for the Great Lakes Cruise Company, and they’re adding new cruises this upcoming year to bring even more tourists to enjoy the region.
Source booksellers

With competition from Amazon and e-readers, big box bookstores have been hit hard. Borders closed in 2011 and Barnes & Noble has been forced to close hundreds of stores.

But independent bookstores are proving to have staying power.

Courtesy of Toko Shiiki

This week marks the four year anniversary of the magnitude nine earthquake that hit the coast of Japan and triggered a tsunami, leaving well over 15,000 people dead. The tsunami also caused the largest nuclear accident since the 1986 Chernobyl disaster.

shelf of wine bottles
Flickr user Geoffrey Fairchild / Flickr

About 10 years ago, when the occupationally snooty world of wine was introduced to the radical idea of putting screw caps on bottles of fine wine, the reaction in some quarters was utter horror.

Until then, the only wines with screw caps to be found anywhere were hip pocket-sized bottles of reinforced wines called Night Train and White Lightening.

In 2004, a study found more than half of American consumers and 60% of British wine drinkers the idea of screw caps on their fine wine.

From a Ferguson protest in New York City.
user The All-Nite Images / Flickr

    

Peaceful protests continued through the weekend in Madison, Wisconsin, after an unarmed black teenager was killed by a white police officer Friday night.

It's the latest conflict between police and the communities they protect.

Today on Stateside:

FLICKR USER DAVID TRAWIN / FLICKR

On Election Day in 2008, Michigan voters said yes to medical marijuana. The vote came despite federal laws banning the sale and consumption of pot.

Since then, local ordinances and court rulings have created a patchwork of rules on the medical marijuana front. Following a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling, patients remain protected as consumers even though sellers no longer have a clear-cut legal protection to sell.

And since 2011, there’s been a drop in the number of patients receiving medical marijuana ID cards.

FLICKR USER RAYMORRIS1 / FLICKR

Studying archeology gives us a chance to open windows into the lives and beliefs of civilizations that have come before us.

We seem to have an endless fascination with Ancient Egypt. So it’s worth noting that we've got a chance to see Egyptian artifacts discovered in the 1920s and 1930s – objects the public has never had the chance to see before.

The University of Michigan’s Kelsey Museum of Archeology is putting on an exhibition, called Death Dogs: The Jackal Gods of Ancient Egypt.

Snyder endorsed the report from the Michigan Department of Technology, Management and Budget indicating a notable decrease in unemployment in Michigan over the past month.
gophouse.com

Governor Rick Snyder was at the Michigan Radio studios earlier today for a special call-in program, taking your questions. The show was hosted by Rick Pluta, Lansing Bureau Chief for the Michigan Public Radio Network. He is also the co-host along with Zoe Clark of It's Just Politics.

FLICKR USER WYLIEPOON /FLICKR

“We all had white bellies and brown arms. We never took off our shirts because we never went to the beach anywhere, despite being residents of the Great Lakes state.”

That’s an excerpt from writer Jim Ray Daniels' collection of short stores set in Warren, Eight Mile High. The collection is on the Library of Michigan’s 2015 Notable Books List and is Daniels’ fifth collection of short stories, though he has also won many prizes and fellowships for his poetry.

Michigan must divide in order to conquer

Mar 9, 2015
Flickr

The Next Idea

When people think of Michigan, a number of iconic images come to mind – a long assembly line, acres of cherry orchards, miles of gorgeous coastline. This wide variety of industry, agriculture and tourism contributes to the resilience of our $400 billion economy and is what makes Michigan special. But these industries and regions also have very different requirements to help them grow. The challenge lies in how to foster growth in each one without competing against each other so that some Michigan residents win only when others lose.

Ryan Elder

One way to prevent accidents might come from redesigning road signs. 

user danielctw / Flickr

Toyota is making changes to its top staff, with more North Americans rising in the ranks.

"For the first time they are elevating some Americans to some very key positions," says Daniel Howes, who recently wrote an article about the changes for the Detroit News.

Today on Stateside:

  • U.S. Sen. Gary Peters discusses working with members from across the aisle on the two bills he has co-signed.
  • Detroit News business columnist Daniel Howes tells us about his recent column on Toyota’s inclusion of more North Americans in high-level positions.
Road in need of repair.
Peter Ito / Flickr

Proposal 1 is the road funding proposal that will be up for a vote on May 5th. The Michigan Chamber of Commerce has long expressed their support for a road funding solution, but they are staying neutral on the proposal.

Gary Peters / Facebook

When he was elected to the U.S. Senate, Gary Peters promised to approach his job in a spirit of bipartisan cooperation. He says that's exactly what's behind the first two bills he has introduced in the Senate.

Flickr user Penn State Special Collections / Flickr

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the confrontation between civil rights marchers and Alabama State Troopers known as Bloody Sunday.

Retired teacher and librarian with Detroit Public Schools Gloria Mills has organized a bus trip to Selma for this weekend's commemoration.

Flickr/Martha Soukup

The Next Idea

Living in Michigan, we experience incivility on a daily basis, from simply driving down pot-hole filled roads to attending public meetings to logging into our social media accounts. This has to change, and not just so our Facebook feeds can feel more like a cocktail party -- though that’s not a bad place to start.

Beyond my ken / Wikimedia Commons

One of the greatest skyscrapers in Detroit is on the auction block.

The Fisher Building and its next-door neighbor, The Albert Kahn Building, have fallen into foreclosure as they struggle with fewer and fewer tenants.

Dan Austin is with the Detroit Free Press, and he runs HistoricDetroit.org.

  Today on Stateside:

  • More on a bill that would require cell phone carriers in Michigan to release location information to police in the event of an emergency.
  • The Fisher Building in Detroit is on the auction block.
  • The ice caves at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore in Lake Superior.
  • A new book from Andrew Hoffman, How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate
  • Why a teen crisis hotline is communicating by text only.
texting with a cell phone
Alton / Creative Commons

The idea of a teen crisis line isn't new.

But think about it: When's the last time you've seen a teenager pick up a phone, dial a number and call someone?

The average teen sends some 2,000 text messages a month.

Smart phone.
Johan Larsson / Flickr

The bill, if passed, would require cell phone carriers in Michigan to release location information to police in the event of an emergency.

In short, according to this House Fiscal Agency analysis, the bill does this:

The scientific community largely agrees climate change is taking place. Yet the public debate over climate change is often polarizing.

Andrew Hoffman wanted to explore just what causes people to accept or reject the scientific consensus on climate change. The result is his new book How Culture Shapes the Climate Change Debate.

Hoffman is the Director of the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise at the University of Michigan. He is also a Professor of Sustainable Enterprise.

user crossn81
Flickr

Before the ice melts, let's take time to celebrate one of winter's great gifts: the sea caves at Apostle Islands National Lakeshore.

Eighteen miles west of Bayfield, Wisconsin is where you can find the island chain in Lake Superior. The islands and the ice have created a breathtaking natural art gallery.

Prison bars.
Thomas Hawk / Flickr / http://tinyurl.com/oall5zn

If you are a 17-year-old and you break a law here in Michigan, you’re going to be tried as an adult.

Michigan is one of nine states that tries 17-year-olds as adults.

Today on Stateside:

  • Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu made his much anticipated speech to Congress today.
  • LaughFest 2015 begins Thursday in Grand Rapids. Teresa Thome talks about her upcoming performance.
  • A Michigan State University professor is using “ambigram” designs to explore creative ways of thinking.
  • There are hundreds of kids aged 13 to 17 in Michigan's adult prisons. What's happening inside those prison walls?

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