Stephen Henderson

Newsmaker Interview
5:32 pm
Tue February 4, 2014

Detroit bankruptcy moving quickly

Peter Martorano Flickr

This week, Stephen Henderson, editorial page editor for the Detroit Free Press, pointed out the positive momentum around the Detroit bankruptcy, and also the glaring outstanding issues that could have a major impact on how quickly and efficiently the bankruptcy proceeds.

All Things Considered host Jennifer White spoke with Stephen Henderson.

Stateside
4:58 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

What happened inside the courtroom during today's Detroit bankruptcy trial

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes
John Meiu Detroit Legal News Publishing LLC

Michigan Radio’s Sarah Cwiek was in the courtroom today when U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes ruled that Detroit was eligible for Chapter 9 bankruptcy.

Stephen Henderson, the editorial page editor of the Detroit Free Press, has been covering the bankruptcy trial on the pages of the Freep.

Sarah and Stephen talk with us in the studio today to discuss what happened today, and what it means for Detroiters.

Listen to full interview above. 

Stateside
4:35 pm
Mon October 28, 2013

The role of race in the Detroit mayoral election

Let's turn to Detroit's Mayoral election. Voters in Michigan's largest city will head to the polls one week from tomorrow.

Within that race for Mayor  is the issue of race. There is a white candidate: Mike Duggan - former Detroit Medical Center CEO, and a black candidate: Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon.

As part of the Detroit Free Press' endorsement of a Mayoral candidate, our next guest penned yesterday's column in the Freep about the complex role that race is playing in this election.

Stephen Henderson is the Editorial Page Editor for the Detroit Free Press and he joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
3:52 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Does Snyder's economic record earn him the title 'One Successful Nerd'?

Left, Detroit Free Press editorial page editor Stephen Henderson on The Colbert Report.
Detroit Free Press Detroit Free Press

The 2014 election season is warming up. In Michigan, we're moving from "One Tough Nerd" to "One Successful Nerd."

In an early bid to make his case for re-election, Gov. Rick Snyder released this video:

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Stateside
4:42 pm
Thu August 8, 2013

Detroit's mayoral candidates need to face the city's harsh reality

Patricia Drury Flickr

An interview with Stephen Henderson, the editorial page editor of the Detroit Free Press.

The primary election of 2013 is history. Now the focus shifts to the November general election.

For the two candidates who want to become Detroit's next mayor, it's time to take stock of the harsh realities facing the city and craft a clear campaign message that addresses those stark truths.

Stephen Henderson has been issuing that challenge from the pages of the Detroit Free Press throughout the campaign, and now that the two challengers have emerged from the primary, we wanted to get his thoughts.

Stephen Henderson, the editorial page editor of the Detroit Free Press, joined us today.

Listen to the full interview above.

Stateside
5:03 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

Building a 'Better Michigan' through media

Stephen Henderson
The Detroit Free Press

An interview with Stephen Henderson of the Detroit Free Press.

To many of us, Sunday mornings mean a full cup of coffee and our Sunday paper. And there certainly has been no shortage of dire and ominous headlines served up with that Sunday morning coffee.

That's why the Detroit Free Press has launched a new effort. It's called "A Better Michigan" and it will seek answers to the question, "What will it take to build a better Michigan?

Those of us at Michigan Radio and on "Stateside" are proud to be partners with the Detroit Free Press in this effort .

The editorial page editor of the Detroit Free Press, Stephen Henderson, joined us to talk about "A Better Michigan."

Listen to the full interview above.

Politics & Government
10:15 am
Wed July 4, 2012

Disputes continue over Detroit's consent agreement, but there is good news

Patricia Drury / flickr

It’s been a few months since the city of Detroit and the state entered into a consent agreement aimed at stabilizing the city’s finances. Since then, the financial advisory board has been formed, but there have been a few hiccups in the city’s progress, including a lawsuit brought by the city’s corporation counsel challenging the validity of the consent agreement.

Stephen Henderson is editorial page editor for the Free Press and the host of "American Black Journal.” He joined us to talk about developments around the consent agreement.

Jennifer White: Do you have a sense of whether progress in being made towards stabilizing the city?

Stephen Henderson: Well a little bit of progress has been made. We got some of the money the state promised to extend to us to keep the city from going bankrupt, and they sold about $80 million worth of bonds in the spring to do that. The second part of that funding though has been held up by this dispute about the city’s corporation counsel, and whether she can sue to stop the consent agreement from taking place. So that’s at least a little bit on hold right now. But of course we got some good news recently because the fiscal year changed over here in Detroit over the weekend. July 1 was the beginning of our fiscal year and so the city is a little bit cash rich right now, even though we still have a structural deficit. So, I think the emergency part of this might be subsiding but we still have big questions about how we’ll manage going forward.

JW:You mentioned the lawsuit brought forward by Krystal Crittendon, the city’s corporation counsel, challenging the consent agreement’s validity, and there was considerable push back from Mayor Bing and the Snyder administration. That included the threat that $28 million in revenue would be withheld from the city. When will there be resolution on that?

SH:I don’t know. That’s a big problem because she asserts that she can, on her own without the support of the mayor, challenge this agreement. Most lawyers and most judges in fact that I’ve talked to say that there’s no way she should be able to do that, but we have a city charter that does not make that terribly clear. So really to solve that problem we have to get back in to the charter and amend it. Of course it would all go away if she would just relent and say it’s not worth holding up the city’s entire existence over this question. But she’s been unable, or unwilling to do that so far.

JW:Does she have the support of city council members?

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