stormwater

Politics & Government
3:56 pm
Mon September 16, 2013

Jackson homeowners will not be allowed to rake their leaves into city streets this fall

"Little leaves fall softly down Red and yellow, orange and brown Whirling, twirling round and round Falling softly to the ground" 'Falling Leaves' by Jack Prelutsky
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Autumn is a lovely time in Jackson.    But people living along Jackson‘s tree lined streets will face a problem this Fall: How to get rid of all those falling leaves?

It’s something of a suburban ritual.   Once the leaves fall, homeowners rake them into the street to be cleared away.     But not this fall in Jackson.

The city recently lost a legal challenge to its storm water fee.   The Court of the Appeals ruled the fee was actually an illegal tax.  

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Politics & Government
12:01 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Jackson laying off city employees to close budget gap created by court ruling

Jackson Mayor Martin Griffin read a prepared statement at last night city council meeting outlining the budget cuts tied to the ruling against the city's storm water fee.
Steve Carmody/Michigan Radio

Some Jackson city employees are getting layoff notices this morning.

The layoffs come as city leaders come to grips with a court ruling striking down Jackson’s storm water fee.

This month, the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled Jackson’s storm water fee was an illegal tax.   The city has decided not to appeal the ruling.

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Environment & Science
1:34 pm
Sun July 21, 2013

More algae in Lake Erie

Satellite image of 2011 bloom (one of the most severe in decades).
Credit MERIS/NASA

A significant amount of blue-green algae is expected in the western basin of Lake Erie this summer. This year’s algal bloom will be about 1/5 as bad as what happened in 2011.

2011 was one of the worst years on record for the explosions of algae growth.

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The Environment Report
10:36 am
Tue April 23, 2013

Grand Rapids officials looking ahead to next big storm

Anderson Eye Care Facebook.com

You can listen to today's Environment Report above.

The Grand River hit a record high level in Grand Rapids over the weekend.  Volunteers spent hours filling sandbags to protect homes and city buildings.

City managers are still dealing with the flood waters. But they’re also planning for future storms.

Haris Alibasic directs Grand Rapids’ Office of Energy and Sustainability.

“Given the more intense and more frequent, intense rain events we’re probably going to be experiencing, as climate change is anticipated to really have a serious impact in the Midwest," he says.

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