Courtesy of Lynne Golodner

The Next Idea

I grew up in a suburb of Detroit and went to school where most of the kids looked like me. During the Jewish holidays, teachers didn't assign work because so many of us were absent. There might have been five or six African-American kids in my high school, and no one wore a hijab in public.

I’ve always been curious about the way other people live. My journey as a journalist and author and writing professor has taken me to find common ground in people different from me. I visited a mosque, attended a candlelight service in a Catholic church in Ireland, and spent a plane ride to Israel having a deep, powerful conversation with a Palestinian man going to see his family. As I developed my writing craft, I continued to seek out stories that showed the similarities in people, the beliefs we share, and the customs we have in common.

The outlook is better for Michigan teenagers looking for Summer jobs.

But not that much better.

State officials are predicting 242,000 teens will look for summer jobs in Michigan. Most will be successful. But still about 26% are expected to end their Summer vacation without picking up a paycheck.

Jeff Aula is an economic analyst with the state of Michigan. He says it’s important for teen job seekers not to get discouraged.


A new study finds young men are at a greater risk of dying from melanoma than young women.

But a University of Michigan expert worries some people will take the wrong message from the study.

Melanoma is one of the most serious forms of skin cancer.

Researchers say their study shows young men were 55% more likely to die from melanoma than young women. The study appears in the journal Dermatology.

Michael Sabel is in U of M’s surgical oncology division. He was not involved in with the study.